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Tonight: Witchcraft Double Feature At SF's Balboa Theatre

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, May 25, 2016 04:36pm | Post a Comment

Black Sunday

-- By Brett Stillo

1960 was a year of change for the horror film. Alfred Hitchcock drove a knife into the collective Black Sundayconsciousness of movie audiences with Psycho, and movies soon followed that twisted the blade. Peeping Tom, Eyes Without a Face, House of Usher...these films took a darker, twisted path, going further than most contemporary horror movies of the era. Two standout films of this seminal year, the supernatural thrillers Black Sunday and City of the Dead will play Tonight, Wednesday, May 25th, at San Francisco’s historic Balboa Theatre at 7pm.

Black Sunday is the stunning directorial debut of legendary Italian director Mario Bava It’s an old-fashioned tale of witches, ghosts, and vampires set amid rotting Victorian splendor, but Bava conjures a grisly visual style that’s bold and shocking. It's a bit ironic that this master of vivid color cinematography launched his directorial career with a black and white movie, and yet the color seems abundant in this gothic-goes-to-the-Drive-In opus. Bava crafts a tapestry of shadows, layer after layer of dark images from a palette that ranges from thick walls of black to opaque shades of pale grey. These monochromatic Horror Hotel, City of the Deadlayers create a weird pseudo-3D effect that makes the backgrounds seem to reach out beyond the screen. Add the haunting beauty of a 23-year-old actress named Barbara Steele and you have one of the true classics among horror films.

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Horror Express Screens at SF's Balboa Theatre, December 14

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 7, 2015 07:25pm | Post a Comment

Horror Express

By Brett Stillo

Horror Express, which will be screened at San Francisco’s historic Balboa Theatre on Monday, Horror ExpressDecember 14 by Super Shangri-La Show, is a grimly fiendish artifact of old-school European horror from the early 1970’s. It's the kind of movie you would stay up late to watch on the Saturday late-night Monster Movie on your local TV station.

Horror Express (1972) was a Spanish production, but it took its cues from Horror Express, Christopher Lee, Peter Cushingthe Technicolor macabre of the Hammer films of the era. Indeed, Hammer’s two greatest stars, Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing (who usually faced off at opposite ends of a crucifix and a wooden stake), are teamed up here as rival Edwardian scientists up to their sideburns in skullduggery aboard the Trans-Siberian Express at the turn of the century. The train is packed with intrigue, sinister mustaches, and an ancient cosmic evil unleashed upon the unsuspecting passengers. Throw in Telly Savalas in an over-the-top super-cameo as a Cossak with a New York accent and you have an old-fashioned horror-adventure that combines elements of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie with Lovecraft-inspired pulp straight out of a moldy old issue of Weird Tales.

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Honeymoon Academy

Posted by phil blankenship, January 7, 2008 05:43pm | Post a Comment
 





Trans World Entertainment / HBO Video 90514

Desperate Moves

Posted by phil blankenship, August 4, 2007 12:59am | Post a Comment
 

     

Trans World Entertainment 38011

The Keeper

Posted by phil blankenship, July 17, 2007 11:40pm | Post a Comment
 





Trans World Entertainment 10031
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