New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Toro y Moi

Posted by Amoebite, November 30, 2015 05:21pm | Post a Comment

Toro y Moi at Amoeba Berkeley

Toro y Moi is the electronic project of American producer and recording artist Chaz Bundick. In 2010, he released his first album, Causers of This, garnering comparisons to the newly-labeled chillwave genre. 2011's Underneath the Pine expanded on his sound, using all live instrumentation and no samples. The Freaking Out EP followed later that year. In December, Caribou invited Toro y Moi to perform at All Tomorrow's Parties.

Toro y Moi What ForIn 2013, Toro y Moi's third studio album, Anything in Return, was released via Carpark. The followup came in 2015, with the studio album What For? and a mixtape called Samantha. In early 2016, Toro y Moi is set to tour Australia and Japan.

Bundick visited Amoeba Berkeley recently to fill out his vinyl collection. He picked up LPs by Ravi Shankar, Elliott Smith, and Oscar Peterson. Watch the full What's In My Bag? episode below to see the rest of his picks and to find out when is his favorite time of day to listen to vinyl.

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Forget Chillwave; Wild Nothing's 'Gemini' is Heartfelt Dream Pop

Posted by Aaron Detroit, June 3, 2010 02:00pm | Post a Comment
Wild Nothing Gemini
Chillwave” in 2010 is as embarassing a genre tag as “Shoegaze” or “Grunge” was in 1991. It sounds more like a vile blue-colored slushy drink from a convenience store than a musical genre. I feel bad for the contemporary Dream Pop bands that have to endure being cast as such. Chillwave is the new Nu-Rave, i.e., nothing more than loosely similar bands being forced into corners by lazy bedroom bloggers. While many young bands, as of late, have been heavily borrowing sonic textures, recording aesthetics, and ideas from those bleary bands of the late ‘80’s and early 90’s, Virginia’s one-man band of Jack Tatum, aka Wild Nothing, has succeeded in making a record that pings the right amount of lilting and forlorn nostalgia via its familiar Dream Pop haze yet is complex enough not to fatigue attentive ears. Gemini, released this week, has all the shimmer of early Cocteau Twins, the bounce of mid-era Cure, and the rough charm of a C86-era mixtape. This is the sort of record I wish Beach House would make.

Gemini’s success as a great Dream Pop album is also highlighted by what it is lacking. Tatum avoids the cloying cutsey tweeness of last year’s retro-darlings The Pains of Being Pure At Heart and instead delivers a breezywild nothing Jack Tatum melancholy. Sincerity is a breath of fresh air here as well -- while essentially postmodern because of its pastiche, Gemini obviously springs from Tatum’s heart, carefully avoiding the irony so many young bands rely on and hide behind. On the slow-crawl of “Pessimist,” Tatum wears it on his sleeve with the line “Boys Don’t Cry/They Just Die” without a hint of a grin. However, the album is never oppressive or dreary, even when Tatum is bummed out; it truly is a great feat to make a record that plays perfectly on a summer drive to the beach or home alone on a rainy day.

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