Amoeblog

Before Reggae

Posted by V.B., November 21, 2014 06:00pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Before Reggae, Rock Steady, and Ska, Calypso was the folk music of the English speaking Caribbean. Like all good folk music, calypsos told stories in song and were often written to celebrate topical events. The music originated with slaves on the plantations. By the golden era of the late 1920s and '30s, there were many diverse influences including music heard from U.S. radio waves that reached the islands.

Here’s what Wikipedia says: Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music that originated in Trinidad and Tobago during the early to mid-20th century. Its rhythms can be traced back to West African Kaiso and the arrival of French planters and their slaves from the French Antilles in the 1600s.

Some of the earliest recordings were by Atilla the Hun, and The Roaring Lion, in the early 1930s.

Atilla – “Roosevelt in Trinidad”

Roaring Lion – “Ugly Woman”


 

Continue reading...

Creole Choir of Cuba Performs at Herbst Theatre in SF, 11/3

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 11, 2011 01:40pm | Post a Comment
CIIS Public Programs & Performances and Amoeba Music present Creole Choir of Cuba in concert atCreole Choir of Cuba San Francisco CIIS Herbst Theatre in San Francisco on November 3rd!

With soul to burn, each member of this rocking ten-person group is directly descended from Haitian immigrants. The choir energizes their singing with a variety of percussion instruments from congas to clave, and enriches their tunes with movement and costumes that reflect Caribbean and African sources.

Don’t miss your chance to see this dynamic choir!

For tickets and more information, visit them HERE. (Group discounts available for 10 or more.)



Dominican-Americans - Happy Hispanic Heritage Month!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 18, 2010 03:00pm | Post a Comment

Dominican Group

In the US, what the word "Latino" connotes varies regionally -- often, regardless of accuracy. In the southwest it usually means "Mexican," in the northeast it means "Puerto Rican" and in Florida, "Cuban." Indeed, those are the three largest populations of Latino-Americanos in the country, although obviously not the only ones. Each have their own distinct culture, history, and place in America. This entry is about the fifth largest Latino population, Dominicans.

Dominican Flag

At last count, there were approximately 1.3 million people of Dominican descent in the country, the majority of whom are descended from a mixture of Spanish, West African and Taíno (the country's indigenous people). There are also large numbers of Jewish, Japanese, Korean, Lebanese and Syrians in the country, as well as immigrants from throughout the Caribbean.

Rafael "el Jefe" Trujillo and Richard Nixon

Continue reading...