Amoeblog

The Art of the LP Cover- Boxing

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, November 14, 2011 10:50am | Post a Comment


In honor of this weekend's epic &  controversial Pacquiao / Marquez bout, I offer up this batch of boxing themed LP covers.

The Art of the LP Cover- Sports

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, July 25, 2011 10:40pm | Post a Comment

For all you jocks, sports fans and closet sports fans.

New Bev Noir: Jan Sterling Double Bill- Ace In The Hole / Harder They Fall

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 14, 2010 02:15pm | Post a Comment


I'm truly saddened that there are too many musical events this weekend for me to make it out to the New Bev for this double. Ace in the Hole is a Billy Wilder flick that has evaded me for some time now. It's noted as one of his most cynical films (that's saying a lot!!) and Jan Sterling's performance is noted to be spectacularly wicked. The Harder They Fall is a classic boxing noir based on a story by Budd Shulberg, he of What Makes Sammy Run?, A Face In The Crowd & On the Waterfront fame. Although I could care less about sports, boxing themed noirs always seem to deliver heavy doses of blackhearted personal reality that stick with me much more deeply than the average cops and robbers story. The Harder They Fall also happens to be Humphrey Bogart's final role. It's among my favorite Bogey pieces; his physical deterioration is apparent and adds to his broken and desperate character. Rod Steiger is at his ruthless best and Max Baer spars with some of his real life demons as the brutal champion Buddy Brannen. Truly a dark double feature and well worth your $7. Damn it, after writing this post I now think I have to squeeze this double into a very busy weekend...

7165 West Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA  90036
(323) 938-4038

Ace In The Hole  Friday 7:30  Sat 3:10 & 7:30
The Harder They Fall  Friday 9:40  Sat 5:20 & 9:40

Art Aragon 1927 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, March 29, 2008 12:38pm | Post a Comment


Several years back I was a dedicated MTA bus rider. I spent countless hours wandering back and forth from Silverlake to my job in Century City where, believe it or not, I worked for a law firm. One afternoon I was sitting in the back staring out into space when someone leaned over past me and tapped the knee of an older man sitting next to me. Hey, this guy told the old man, you’re Art Aragon. Sure enough sitting next to me was none other then LA’s original "Golden Boy,” the legendary and flamboyant Hall of Fame Boxer. This past week Art Aragon died at the age of 80 from the effects of a stroke. And though he never won the world title he was one of boxing’s biggest draws during the 40’s and 50’s.

Born in Belen, New Mexico in 1927, Aragon grew up in East Los Angeles and began boxing in 1942. His first professional fight was in May 1944, against Frenchy Rene at the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles. He ended his career with a 90-20-6 record, including 61 wins by knockout. He fought many of the stars of the era like Tommy Campbell, Jesse Flores, Carmen Basilio, Don Jordan, Billy Graham, Chuck Davey and Chico Vejarand. Sadly, Aragon had only one title shot in his career, losing to lightweight champion James Carter in November 1951. Aragon, who often struggled to make his weight class, said afterward that he was weak from having to lose seven pounds in the few days before the bout.


Though he was never a world champ, in 1990 Aragon was inducted into the World Boxing Hall of Fame. And while he had a great fight career, it was marred by allegations that he fixed a few of his fights. In February 1957, Aragon was convicted of offering a $500 bribe to welterweight Dick Goldstein to take a dive in their scheduled San Antonio bout the previous December. The fight was called off at the last moment when Aragon became ill. Eventually though, the conviction was overturned on appeal.  

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The simpletons guide to the history of ...

Posted by Whitmore, October 26, 2007 09:23pm | Post a Comment