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Red Bull Sound Select Interviews: Isaac Rother & The Phantoms

Posted by Billy Gil, February 12, 2014 10:02am | Post a Comment

isaac rother & the phantoms amoebaOpening the Red Bull Sound Select show presented by Amoeba Feb. 27 at The Echoplex will be Isaac Rother & The Phantoms. The band plays a wicked rock 'n' roll inspired by classic blues, classic horror films and novelty monster songs—think "Monster Mash" and "Purple People Eater." Rother plays the star on his album The Unspeakable Horror of..., playing The Phantom, who leads his band through a howling set of Bo Diddley-style blues riffs, surf-rock touches and growling vocals.

The band plays with FIDLAR, the newly announced Cheatahs and Cherry Glazerr at the show. It's $3 with RSVP and $12 without. Doors are at 8 p.m. Check back here this week for interviews with FIDLAR and Cherry Glazerr!

We caught up with Isaac Rother as he moved his project from Olympia, Wash. to right here in Los Angeles with a new lineup.

Most L.A. people are new to your band. What should we expect from an Isaac Rother & the Phantoms show? Or do you prefer people to leave expectations at the door?

Rother: Expect the majestic spell of rock 'n' roll to be cast over thine body. Expect to be transported to a higher plane of existence where one can truly be free to experience the everlasting moment that is now. I want everyone who sees The Phantoms to be uplifted and inspired by the music because that’s what music does for me. Expect to be entertained and expect to have a good time. 

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Amoeba Presents Dr. John at the Hollywood Bowl

Posted by Billy Gil, June 28, 2013 11:58am | Post a Comment
dr. john
Dr. John

Amoeba Music is proud to present New Orleans music legend Dr. John at the Hollywood Bowl on Wednesday, July 31. He’ll be paying homage to another legend, Louis Armstrong, in this show dubbed “Props to Pops: Dr. John’s Tribute to Louis Armstrong.”

At this show Dr. John will be joined by guest trumpeters, singers and other musicians, including The Blind Boys of Alabama, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Telmary Diaz, Anthony Hamilton, Terry Blanchard, Nicholas Payton, Arturo Sandoval, Marcus Belgrave and Wendel Brunious. Expect Armstrong’s well-loved works like “Mack the Knife” and “Wonderful World” to be given the grimy swamp-blues treatment. Buy tickets here.

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Huge Jazz & Blues LP Collection Hits Amoeba SF this Saturday!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 1, 2012 05:45pm | Post a Comment
Once again, we have hit the collectors' motherload as a huge Jazz & Blues LP collection has come into our hands at the Amoeba San Francisco store. We have hundreds of rare titlesmany Blue Note label LPs and DJ promo labels, and we are going to make them available for your browsing and buying pleasure this Saturday, October 6th





 

What Are Those Schlocky Pop 78s Doing in My Blues Record Collection?

Posted by Sherwin Dunner, June 22, 2012 06:50pm | Post a Comment

Over the years I've shared my favorite vintage 78s with friends who are not part of the hard core 78 collector crowd. While we might share a taste for the same films, books and restaurants, we're not quite on the same page with music, at least not yet. Since I'm fondest of music from the 1920s and 1930s, and that's a long way from the 21st Century, it's a challenge to break in those who live with contemporary sounds. Not that I'm hoping to make full converts, but if I share some of my favorite 78s, maybe some will cross the accessibility threshold and they'll acquire a taste for more. Inevitably, when it comes to 1920s jazz, most fall flat – it all apparently sounds like cartoon music. With blues singers, the all too familiar refrain is that it's three chords and the same song over and over. Even though I always play those I consider "can't miss winners," in principle I can't totally disagree with them as I've spent many hours squirming my way through what I consider “formulated” blues 78s by lesser, second tier blues singers.

The great country bluesmen seldom recorded a formulated dud, but in acquainting myself with their body of work, I discovered that those few 78s where country blues singers chose to work their magic on popular tin-pan-alley hits were some of my favorite 78s. It was refreshing to hear the different tempos, more varied melodies, and new notes coming out of the instruments of these masters once outside the confines of the blues idiom. The best selling sheet music for these songs could be found sitting on pianos in middle class homes. Orchestras in every podunk town were playing stock arrangements of them at dance halls. And in a few rare cases, they made it onto “race” records by blues singers. Some of my purist blues collector friends pointed out with a sneer, those were POP records, eyeballing me like there was a cancer hanging over my blues collecting impulse, yet I prized these performances over many of the straight blues sides, and whenever possible I would swing a trade for some of these pop records by blues singers. So I'm of a different ilk, not strictly a blues collector, but a music collector who likes great blues singers, especially when they are not singing the blues.
 

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Otis Rush: Unheralded Blues Master!

Posted by V.B., June 7, 2012 06:34pm | Post a Comment
To check out extensive LP label and price guides plus cover art, head to the Vinyl Beat website!

Otis Rush

In 1956, Willie Dixon was lured from Chess Records to be the musical director of the newly formed Cobra label.  He signed the relatively unknown Otis Rush, and the stage was set for some of the deepest Chicago blues ever recorded.  Otis had amazing pipes and played a mean left-handed blues guitar.  Perhaps more importantly, Willie Dixon was able to get an otherworldly sound on his singles.

Otis Rush Cobra
 Otis Rush in a 1957 Cobra publicity shot.


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