Amoeblog

Live UK TV Version of Cee-Lo Green's "Fuck You" on Later With Jools Holland

Posted by Billyjam, October 7, 2010 05:54am | Post a Comment
Cee-Lo Green "Fuck You" live on BBC (2010)

Above is a charged live version of Cee-Lo Green's much buzzed about current song "Fuck You" from a couple of nights ago live on Later with Jools Holland on the BBC, where obviously cursing is not as much of an issue (especially past a certain hour) as here in the US on network TV. See the original music video for the song here.

Rats the size of cats

Posted by Whitmore, September 12, 2009 08:47pm | Post a Comment

Rats
the size of a cats and fanged frogs were discovered by Smithsonian Institution biologists working with the Natural History Unit from the BBC in the remote Southern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea in the Mount Bosavi Crater, an extinct volcano. The huge crater, measuring two and half miles wide and rimmed with walls nearly half a mile high, appear to have trapped these creatures inside the isolated crater’s rainforests and they possibly have never been seen by man before.
 
Among the discoveries is a woolly silvery gray rat, weighing nearly 3.5 pounds, and measuring 32 inches from nose to tail, that’s almost three friggin’ feet long! I think I just soiled myself...
 
The Bosavi Crater rat would be one of the largest rats in the world. Most surprising to the BBC documentary team, the rodents were completely tame, a sign that animals were unfamiliar with humans. The rats live on a diet of leaves and roots, and probably build their nests underground beneath rocks and tree roots. A member of the genus Mallomys, these rats have yet to receive their formal scientific name. More than 70 species of rats and mice are found on Papua New Guinea. (And I don’t think I’ll be vacationing there anytime soon.)
 
Altogether, some 40 new species were discovered by the crater expedition, including approximately 16 species of frog, one species of gecko, at least three new species of fish, 20 species of insects and spiders and one new species of bat, plus what may be a new subspecies of tree-living marsupial.
 
The BBC and Smithsonian teams found these previously unknown species while filming a documentary about wildlife of Papua New Guinea. The film, Lost Land of the Volcano, is a three part series which started airing this week in the United Kingdom on BBC One. Below is some footage.

Happy Beatles Day: 9/9/09 Remastered Beatles For Sale

Posted by Billyjam, September 9, 2009 09:22am | Post a Comment

The Beatles On Record (excerpt 3)

Happy Beatles Day! Today, 9/9/09, is the much anticipated Beatles Day and Amoeba Music is celebrating the occasion in style with fun Fab Four related activities at each store all day today, and of course the Beatlesnewly remastered Beatles music is finally here. Beatles Day means that that digitally remastered Beatles catalog, which has been talked about for ages, is now available to buy at Amoeba Music.

The reissued, remastered Beatles catalog, which is worth getting for old and new Beatles fans alike, includes all of the Beatles CDs packaged with replicated UK album art, expanded booklets with original and newly written liner notes, rare photos and more good stuff. And note that at Amoeba you can get a free Beatles limited edition litho with your purchase today of two or more Beatles remastered CDs while supplies last. 

But regardless of whatever you plan on buying Beatles-wise today, swing by Amoeba Music's Beatles Day celebration, which includes special Beatles DJ sets, trivia giveaways, Beatles look-alike contests, Beatles auction an more stuff. For more information on exact Beatles Day schedules at each store, scroll down or click here, and read the numerous recent Beatles 2009 Amoeblogs.


Don't Panic!

Posted by Whitmore, March 9, 2009 08:12pm | Post a Comment
hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy
Yesterday (and it always seems to fall on a yesterday) on this date in 1978, the mind-bending sci-fi comedy adventure series that no doubt changed life, the universe and everything -- well, as far as I know, however I know, or think I understand to know, I know when I know, no matter how intangible the facts ... but anyway -- Douglas AdamsThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy was originally broadcast in the United Kingdom on the BBC radio. It would be another three years, March of 1981, before the Hitchhikers Guide series finally premiered in the United States on National Public Radio.
 
Adams would follow up this initial version of The Hitchhiker's Guide with more radio productions, five novels, computer games, a six part television miniseries and finally a major motion picture. Not to mention a variety of short stories, comic books, essays and enough odds and ends to fill any aging record store employee’s emotional void. Unfortunately Arthur Dent’s, Ford Prefect’s, Trillion’s, Marvin’s and Zaphod Beeblebrox’ galaxy came to an abrupt and tragic halt when Douglas Adams died of a heart attack at the age of 49 while working out in a gym in the town of Montecito near Santa Barbara on May 11, 2001. 
 
Oddly enough I still hold a grudge against Santa Barbara County and the town of Montecito, and especially jogging treadmills. I know it’s irrational but I’ll debate these opinions with anyone under any circumstances in circumstances beyond anyone’s control anytime. (Then again, irrationality is one of our species' most interesting and unique traits, along with regret and that opposable prehensile thumb). Anyway, I know treadmills are mostly harmless, Santa Barbara is mostly harmless but Adams' early death has always pissed me off to no end. I think the universe, once again, was short-changed and bung holed by some bitter, bitter cosmic throw of the dice. Officially the cause of death was a gradual narrowing of the coronary arteries, which led to a myocardial infarction and a fatal cardiac arrhythmia -- a condition Adams unknowingly suffered. And I am still sad.
 
Here is the first episode of the BBC's radio production of the The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.



Delia Derbyshire - electronic music pioneer

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 6, 2009 07:33pm | Post a Comment
Delia Derbyshire

The Guardian once described Delia Derbyshire as “The unsung heroine of British electronic music,” seemingly implying that there are other heroines of British electronic music that are more widely… sung. I suppose there is Daphne Oram but the English never use less than three adjectives when one will suffice, so let’s just say that Delia Derbyshire is an unsung heroine of music. That she happens to have worked primarily in electronic music is secondary and that she was British shouldn't be held against her. She was a wizard and pioneer who, instead of guarding her magical abililties, eagerly shared her techniques and discoveries, but was stifled by the BBC’s draconian demands that their artists work and die in anonymity.


Delia was born in Coventry on May 5th, 1937. As a girl, she learned piano and violin and attended Barr's Hill School. She later attended college at Girton in Cambridge. After initially pursuing studies in math, she switched courses to music before graduation. After graduation, she began to look for work in the music field, quickly butting up against the deeply entrenched sexism of the field. In fact, in 1959, upon applying for a job at Decca, she was flatly told that their policy was to not hire women to work in the studios. The United Nations proved more diplomatic than the folks at Decca, and she worked there for a short while. Then she returned to England and found employment at the London-based music publisher, Boosey & Hawkes. She didn’t stay long.
In 1960, she was hired as a trainee studio manager at the BBC, working with the Radiophonic Workshop, then just a few years old. It was an organization charged with producing experimental incidental music and sound effects for the BBC Third Programme’s radio plays in cases where the normal orchestral score was deemed inappropriate. Her predecessors had included Harry Desmond Briscoe and Daphne Oram, two noted pioneers of electronic music and musique concrète.
Derbyshire came on board following Oram’s departure, as part of a group of young artists that also included Brian Hodgson and John Baker. Many of her initial pieces were collaborations with artist/playwright Barry Bermange. One such piece was 1964’s The Dreams, a sound collage of people describing their dreams with Derbyshire's electronic sounds.


Gradually, the Radiophonic Workshop began producing more music and sound effects for television than radio. One year earlier, in 1963, Derbyshire performed her mostly widely-heard work when given the score for Ron Grainer’s theme to a new science-fiction series, Doctor Who. Incorporating filters, tape loops and valve oscillators, she fashioned one of the most memorable pieces of electronic music ever, and one that's especially dear to Whovians. Grainer was so impressed he sought to give Derbyshire co-author credit but the BBC prevented it. Although officially uncredited, the popularity of the theme resulted in her employers giving her many other assignments and she ultimately produced over 200 pieces including noteworthy scores for Great Zoos of the World and Cyprian Queen. The BBC was, however, by no means entirely supportive of her work, rejecting many of her compositions, claiming they were too bizarre, “too lascivious for 11 year olds” and “too sophisticated for the BBC2 audience.”

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