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GUERILLA ARTISTS CREATIVELY REDECORATE PUBLIC SPACES

Posted by Billyjam, May 25, 2007 08:08pm | Post a Comment
 
'I'm like the Rainman of the F train now because I now know every speck of that train,' laughed New York public space guerilla artist & recent subway prankster Ellen Moynihan. "Sixty seats, eight doors, and seven poles. And the overhead ads are exactly seventy inches by ten inches," said the ring leader of the spirited and highly creative four-woman House Of Malcontents crew, made up of Ellen and three other New York artists with a shared desire to reshape public spaces such as a subway car to make it more homey. This they accomplished last month when all four boarded an early morning F train in Brooklyn headed into Manhattan, and briskly and artistically made it over to look and feel more like ... home.

'No Train Like Home,' they dubbed the installation that took the four guerilla artists 40 minutes to carry out during early morning New York City commute hour. Carol Tessitore was one of the collaborators. The other two wish to remain anonymous because of the illegality of the maneuver. The idea for the 'No Train Like Home' came to Moynihan, who is also a writer (currently working on a book about Patti Smith), after checking out Mark Ecko's controversial graffiti on subway event in Chelsea a couple of years ago. Later, as she was riding the bland, drab, New York subway, she fantasized about how great it would be to make over the institutionalized-looking subway car into something warmer, to make it feel and look like your living room -- especially since so many New Yorkers spend so much time commuting by subway daily.

     

At first she thought, "How cool would it be to get a grant and get a lot of money and a subway car of my own to redecorate?" But soon after she gave up on the difficult task of trying to get a grant, and also on the idea of asking for permission. So she studied the subway to learn "every speck" -- taking photos and measuring in preparation for the perfectly plotted makeover morning (April 6th) when Ellen and her three fellow Malcontents went to work on the train. They put a runner rug down the center of the subway car and taped down 'welcome' mats near the sliding train doors, covered the windows with curtains, tied flowers to the poles, put pillows on the usually uncomfortable hard seats, scattered magazines around to read, and nice art to look at instead of the ads already there. "We made copies of family portraits or paintings you'd see at home," said photoshop expert Carol, who also 'stitched together' on computer photo images of books on a shelf and later printed them out on the long reams of paper they had purchased.

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The Weirdo

Posted by phil blankenship, May 24, 2007 09:05pm | Post a Comment
 





Raedon Home Video RD-011

Old Joy Is the New, Softer, Gentler Joy....

Posted by Miss Ess, May 24, 2007 08:03pm | Post a Comment
So I went to see Old Joy back when it was at the Red Vic.  It's out on DVD now and it's really different from any movie I can think of at the (tired) moment.  In a good way.

old joy will oldham

I'd like to stress again here on my blog (strongly) that I am not a Yoga Mat Person, but I will say thisyoga freak mat movie has a meditational feeling to it.  By that, I mean while you watch it there is so much silence and there are so many moments of a quiet kind of reflection that when you finish watching it you really do feel like you went somewhere else on a journey.

The journey of the film takes place in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon.  Old friends from way back Mark and Kurt meet up and go camping.  They haven't seen each other in a long time and it's obvious that their lives have branched far away from one another in those years apart.  What's great about this film is that the issues that  this growing apart have caused are never directly addressed.  Instead, the filmmaker Kelly Reichardt allows the viewer to use those gorgeous silent moments to absorb thoughts and scenery and to reflect, bring about one's own ideas, and draw one's own conclusions.  I love it when movies don't preach their message to you,slam you over the head with whatever it is they are trying to get you to feel,  and this one is brilliant in that regard.

old joy will oldham

old joy will oldhamThe film definitely sparked my own memories aboutsteve urkel similar experiences.  It got the awkward silences right for sure. Mark is the Reformed And Now Responsible Guy and Kurt is the Wild Dude That Never Grew Up Totally.  Kurt is still flying by the seat of his pants and Mark is uncomfortably wearing his like Urkel.  I read a review a few weeks ago that said how the viewer sees both Mark and Kurt by the end of the film will say a lot about how that viewer sees life in general and I think that is a fair and interesting commentwill oldham bonnie prince billy

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In A Tired Week, There Is Jolene

Posted by Miss Ess, May 24, 2007 07:04pm | Post a Comment
Oh, what a week.

The View is self destructing right there on live tv for everyone to see.
the view rosie o'donnell elisabeth hasselbeck










America's Next Top Model is over.

america's next top model tyra banks jaslene


                                                                            Even b-b-b-boring American Idol is over.

american idol jordin sparks






















What else is there?

Well, there's a new video for the White Stripes first single from their forthcoming album, Icky Thump.  You can watch it here: Icky Thump Video Hottness

white stripes icky thump jack whiteicky thump meg white white stripes

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POSTAGE HIKE FURTHER HINDERS STRUGGLING MUSIC INDUSTRY

Posted by Billyjam, May 24, 2007 05:29pm | Post a Comment
ian mackaye
When at the beginning of last week the United States Post Office quietly but significantly raised its rates (yet again), small struggling music companies that depend on mail-orders to generate important cash-flow particularly felt the pinch. Among them was Washington DC's Dischord Records, the longtime, legendary, anti-capitalist label founded by Jeff Nelson and Ian MacKaye. As a result of the USPS rates hike, the label was forced to abandon its long-running, customer-friendly, postpaid policy whereby, until just last week, when someone bought, say, a mail-ordered copy of a Fugazi album or CD for $10, the price included all shipping and handling costs. But not anymore! 
    
"For the first time in our 27 years we decided that we can no longer cover for the Post Office because we've always had a postpaid price. We always operated like 'this is the price including postage' but they keep raising the price at a maddening pace," said Dischord's Ian MacKaye who is equally known for his membership of such bands as Teen Idles, Minor Threat, Embrace, Fugazi, Pailhead, and most recently, The Evens.
 
"We were before just barely breaking even," said MacKaye in an interview with me on WFMU last week (archived on MP3 here), in which he suggested that something even criminal is afoot with the latest USPS price hikes. "This most recent increase, I think, is completely insane and it is a crime. Someone from Time Warner and similar kinds of corporations has gotten involved and they've managed to create a situation in which their rates have not gone up or they have gone up insignificantly and yet the smaller publishing companies, and that includes Dischord and other labels, our prices for shipping went up 30%, so if we were selling a CD for ten bucks and charging a $1.60 to ship it, it's now gone up to something like $2.20. It's quite an increase."

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