Amoeblog

Guillaume Apollinaire

Posted by Whitmore, November 11, 2007 10:05am | Post a Comment

This weekend marks the anniversary of the death of a personal hero of mine, poet Guillaume Apollinaris de Kostrowitzky, better known as Apollinaire, who died during the Spanish influenza pandemic of 1918. His greatest contribution to the 20th century, other than coining the term ‘surrealism’ and helping to publicize and define the cubist movement, was probably his poetry, influencing many of the avant-garde, dada and surrealist writers in post-Great War France, such as André Breton and Tristan Tzara.


Some of the best anecdotes about Apollinaire concern his occasionally dubious character. He was known for reviewing non-existent books and writing erotic / pornographic fantasies under pseudonyms. Re-inventing facts was a penchant of his, often ending in uncomfortable predicaments. In 1911, for example, he was detained for six days on suspicion of stealing the Mona Lisa.  When things looked a bit bleak, he pointed the finger at his trusted friend Pablo Picasso, implicating him in one of the biggest crimes of the era. Both were eventually exonerated, but the Mona Lisa wasn’t recovered until 1913, and after some eight forgeries had been sold! Nevertheless, the more adventurous Parisians were counted in Apollinaire’s circle of friends and colleagues. They were the who’s who of  Paris, artists like Picasso, Henri Rousseau, Marie Laurencin (his long time lover), Marc Chagall and Marcel Duchamp, writers Gertrude Stein, Alfred Jarry, Max Jacob, and composer Erik Satie.

After the start of the First World War, Apollinaire joined the French military, requesting front-line infantry duty. On March 17, 1916, while entrenched on the front near Champagne close to the Belgian frontier, he suffered a shell wound to the temple. The neurological consequences of such an injury are uncertain. But what is certain, according to people who knew him before and after, his personality and behavior altered dramatically. He became irritable, anxious and depressed, ending significant relationships, including breaking the engagement to his fiancé. Perhaps in part because of his war wounds, exposure to mustard gas, or any of the multiple surgeries he underwent, Apollinaire would become one of an estimated 100 million people worldwide who died from the great influenza pandemic, passing on November 9th in his apartment in Paris at 202 Boulevard Saint-Germain. Every couple of years or so I travel to Paris and I always make a point to stop by his gravesite in Père Lachaise, open a bottle of wine, snack on some bread and cheese, relax and give people directions to Chopin’s and Jim Morrison’s graves.

NORMAN MAILER DIED TODAY AT AGE 84

Posted by Billyjam, November 10, 2007 04:22pm | Post a Comment
norman mailer
Norman Mailer
, the famed American writer, died earlier today (Saturday Nov 10th) of acute renal failure following lung surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital  in New York City, according to his biographer Michael Lennon. He was 84. For the full news report courtesy of the Associated Press, click here. Along with such writers as Tom Wolfe and Truman Capote, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner was considered an innovator of creative nonfiction or "New Journalism."

He leaves behind a very rich literary legacy that includes The Naked and The Dead, The Executioner's Song, The Armies of the Night, and too many more to mention --click on the link for a list of many of Norman Mailer's books. Even up to close to his death, Mailer was still active and always focused, articulate and ready to share his opinion on important issues. Check out the interview clip below he did about five months ago on the topic of Iraq and the American Right. Then, the clip below that is another recent interview with Mailer-- an excerpt of an interview with Charlie Rose talking about his novel The Castle In The Forest, published this year by Random House.
  
    

Big Trouble In Little China - Midnight TONIGHT At The New Beverly

Posted by phil blankenship, November 10, 2007 01:57pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music & Phil Blankenship proudly present:

Saturday Nov. 10


Kurt Russel in
John Carpenter's


Big Trouble In Little China


New Beverly Cinema

7165 W Beverly Blvd

Los Angeles, CA 90036

(323) 938-4038

Midnight, $7


http://www.myspace.com/newbeverlymidnights

NYC EXTREME SPORTS: YOU COULD DIE

Posted by Billyjam, November 10, 2007 03:00am | Post a Comment

Recently in New York City a 21 year old "subway surfer" was killed after getting bounced off a moving C line train. Subway surfing is the dare-devil stunt that involves riding either atop or clinging to the side of a moving train. While popular in certain South American and European cities (including in Denmark, where the documentary excerpt below is from), it has only been sporadically popular in New York City's MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority) subway system over recent years, and for good reason. The stunt has a very high probability of ending in fatal disaster due to the tight space between the train and the MTA tunnels. Unlike in other foreign cities, where the trains are mostly outdoors, the MTA run mainly through underground tunnels. Four years ago there were several subway-surfing fatalities on New York's subway system within a short time span -- apparently inspired by some publicity about the practice at that time. Since then, the MTA has initiated a campaign educating those foolish enough to try surfing a New York subway car.


In comparison, the relatively tame, although still illegal and dangerous, annual Broadway Bomb -- a race in which about a hundred daredevil skateboarders roll from uptown to downtown Manhattan along Broadway from 116th Street all the way down to Bowling Green, which is eight and half miles, dodging cars, buses, and taxis and ignoring traffic lights along the way -- went without incident two Sundays ago in New York City.  And even though the motto for the event is "You could die," no one has so far. But then, the event is held on a Sunday when there is very little traffic in NYC compared to weekdays. There is also talk that the event, which already has sponsors, may soon become legit.

Continue reading...

My So-Called Life - It's Been 13 Years and I Can Say In My Case It's Still So-Called....

Posted by Miss Ess, November 9, 2007 02:49pm | Post a Comment
my so-called life claire danes

I was 15 years old when My So-Called Life was on TV, exactly the same age as its main character, Angela.  I remember watching it as it originally aired on ABC and becoming more and more obsessed rayanne graff my so-called lifewith the show.  I really felt like it was like watching my own life in so many ways...  except I don't have anbrian krakow my so-called life annoying little sister, just an aggravating older brother.

The parents are truly exactly like my parents, the friends really are like my friends from high school, especially Sharon, Ricky and Brian-- I didn't have my own Rayanne until college.  Everyone has had a Jordan Catalano in their life to some degree, let's face it.

Anyway, so the show has just been reissued on DVD and I am having the best time watching and reliving it all.   I guess it's been about 2 years since I watched any of the 19 episodes, and this DVD set has all kinds of extras the other one didn't.  The day I got the new box set I eagerly watched every extra (minus the commentaries as of yet). 

claire danesThere's a recent interview with Claire Danes (Angela) and she has this weird air about her.  She seemsclaire danes my so-called life angela chase unnaturally poised or something, and her perfectly coiffed layered blond hair stands in stark contrast to her fire engine red stick straight hair back when she played Angela.  She seems miles away from Angela, and I guess she should since that was 13 or so years ago.  In a way though, I still feel often like that kid I was in high school, and Claire, despite admitting to sharing many characteristics with the fictional Angela, seems not only to have moved waaaaay beyond her 15 year old self, but also seems determined in her speaking on the DVDs to prove it to be so.  Maybe a lot of people come up to her in the street and still expect her to BE Angela.  That really would get old.  I'm glad she's agreed to be on the new DVDs at all.  It was an interesting experience to see her now, speaking about what transpired so long ago.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  1565  1566  1567  1568  1569  1570  1571  1572  1573  1574  1575  1576  >>  NEXT