Amoeblog

WATERMARKED ADVANCE CDs CAUSE CONTROVERSY

Posted by Billyjam, September 11, 2007 07:39pm | Post a Comment

If by chance you are not familiar with the practice of watermarking advance/promo CDs, it's something that record labels undertake in an effort to discourage digital bootlegging/file-sharing of their releases in advance of street dates. Check out this really interesting and well-written story about the controversy caused over a leaked watermarked CD -- namely, the new Beirut album The Flying Club Cup on New Jersey based label Ba Da Bing! Records (whose roster includes Dead C). Eloquently penned by music writer Erik Davis, who contributes to Blender and Arthur, among other publications, it perfectly explains the whole practice and the issues it raises. It also describes the hot water that the writer recently found himself in with Ben Goldberg of Ba Da Bing Records. Titled "My Data Crime: The Ticking Time Bomb of the Watermarked Advance CD" and posted a few days ago, Erick Davis' article can be read on the Techgnosis website.

Further Tales of the City

Posted by Miss Ess, September 11, 2007 02:25pm | Post a Comment
I'm so disappointed.  I've just finished watching Further Tales of the City and it was only one disc'sfurther tales of the city worth of a show.  They have it packaged in two jewel cases, so I just assumed I had a whole 'nother disc waiting for my viewing pleasure this evening.  Imagine my heartbreak upon discovering the second disc is devoted to "Special Features" only.  What a letdown!  Not to start with the negative, though, I mean the reason I am so sad is--

I really grew attached to this series as it unfolded.  The characters were real to me, the way they become in any film/series when each person really pops off the screen and into one's brain.   I don't want to ruin any of the plot details for anyone so I can't really say much, but I will say I had further tales of the city mouse michael jonnightmares last night about Mouse and Jon and what might become of them-- that's how kooky I am about this show.  I thought I was gonna get to see more of their story today but NO, that was it.  Guess I am gonna have to go get those Tales of the City books now to get my fix.

Further Tales of the City is the final installment of the Tales of the City series. I would say it's the most racy, and it's also one looooooong episode as opposed to the format of the others, which each had a bunch of hour or so long episodes.  As my boyfriend and I continued watching and watching, kinda waiting for it to end and at the same time on the edge of our couch as the stories unfolded, 3+ hours passed -- we couldn't believe it had been on that long at the end.

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YOKOHAMA JAPAN GRAFFITI GALLERY PART I

Posted by Billyjam, September 11, 2007 10:45am | Post a Comment
      

These photos, all recently shot in Yokohama, Japan, were taken by Amoeba Music fan ACCO, who is a major fan of all four elements of hip-hop, especially graf and turntablism. In Japan the native word for graffiti is "rakugaki," although this term tends to symbolize the more traditional (pre hip-hop) meaning for graffiti. Many consider the early nineties as the real beginning of Japanese graffiti in the hip-hop related form and, interestingly, graffiti was the last element of hip-hop to catch on in Japan. Hence, compared to the US, graf in Japan is still a relatively young art form. But nonetheless, it is a recognized one by both the underground and established art worlds, something confirmed two years ago when a major contemporary Japanese art museum took the unprecedented step of dedicating an entire exhibit to showcasing graffiti writers, titled the "X-COLOR Graffiti in Japan." The exhibit was held at the Art Tower Mito, under curator Kenji Kubota, who invited Japanese graf artists from all over the country to do something unheard of before in Japanese musuem galleries: to freely tag up the museum's walls and create pieces throughout the city as way to help the average Japanese citizen to appreciate the street art form more. These pictures, the first in a three part series, were all taken in Yokohama recently.






new releases coming out 9/11...

Posted by Brad Schelden, September 10, 2007 11:05pm | Post a Comment






  vs.






          "Graduation" by Kanye West                                                                            "Curtis" by 50 Cent

9/11 is sort of a ridiculous street date. There is so much coming out today. I really didn't even know where to start. This week will be the battle between two giants of hip hop, Kanye West and 50 Cent. I have not heard either album yet but I am really betting on Kanye coming ahead of 50. I love the artwork for his new album and the song "Stronger" is fantastic. I was a bit confused about Kanye collaborating with Daft Punk, but it works out so perfectly. I was also sort of sick of 50 Cent after "In Da Club." I would be fine with never having to hear him or that song again. But I know a lot of people still love him. So I am a bit biased in my pick for Kanye. But he was awesome at the VMA's if not a bit over dramatic. He has claimed he will never have anything to do with the VMA's again after not winning again. I don't think he really needs to worry. He was all over the show and I don't think the fact that he didn't win a VMA is going to effect the sales of his album one bit.

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Pulp - The pre-Britpop days

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 10, 2007 04:15pm | Post a Comment
I was wondering whilst trying to fall asleep the other night why I haven't ever looked up any Pulp videos on Youtube before. Then I remembered that I had a dvd called Hits, so what else could there be? A few seconds later, a vacuum tube in my mind sparked to life and I recalled (to myself) that Jarvis is pretty ambivalent at best about the early years, so I was excited to find two early videos.


PULP'S BEGINNINGS 

Pulp was formed in 1978 by 15-year-old Jarvis Cocker, a student at Sheffield's City Secondary School.
In 1980 they, amazingly, recorded a Peel Session. I only just found out that it's available on CD, so I haven't heard it, but it's supposedly pretty in-line with Sheffield's reigning synth-rock sound of the time.

Pulp 1981

In 1982 the still virginal Jarvis recorded It.


The record reflected a change in direction toward a folky, jangly sound with wide-eyed lyrics about love and being shy all sung rather off-key but kind of managing to sound like early Leonard Cohen.

The following year saw the single "My Lighthouse."

 










And, at the encouragement of someone at the label to record more commercial stuff in the style of Wham!, they followed it with the rare, and not half-bad Everybody's Problem.

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