Amoeblog

Dirty Dancing at the New Beverly - Saturday at Midnight ! !

Posted by phil blankenship, February 6, 2008 05:40pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Music and Phil Blankenship are proud to present some of our film favorites at Los Angeles’ last full-time revival movie theater. See movies the way they're meant to be seen - on the big screen and with an audience!


Saturday Feb. 9

Get Ready For The
Time Of Your Life!

Dirty Dancing

New Beverly Cinema
7165 W Beverly Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 938-4038
Midnight, $7


Upcoming:
Feb 23 Commando
Mar 1 Harley Davidson And The Marlboro Man
Mar 8 Streets Of Fire
Mar 15 Can't Hardly Wait (10th Anniversary!)
Mar 29 The Funhouse

Add us as a friend on myspace !
http://www.myspace.com/newbeverlymidnights

They Call Me The Mercenary #5

Posted by phil blankenship, February 6, 2008 05:32pm | Post a Comment
 



GIVE THAT DANCE A NAME

Posted by Billyjam, February 6, 2008 05:05pm | Post a Comment

After a friend of mine had recently shown me a hilariously entertaining online video clip of someone dancing with wild abandon at an outdoor party, I later tried to locate it myself on YouTube but without any luck. However, in my research, under the title search "dance like no one is watching," I stumbled upon a flood of other video clips: five of which I have included here. If you have a moment to watch them (they're all pretty short -- 30 seconds or so) and want to name that dance which each dancer might be doing, please contribute in the COMMENTS box below. Thanks!

DANCER NUMBER 1 ABOVE

DANCER NUMBER 2 ABOVE:

DANCER NUMBER 3 ABOVE:

DANCER NUMBER 4 ABOVE:

DANCER NUMBER 5 ABOVE:

New Zealand Day or, Happy Waitangi Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 6, 2008 03:04pm | Post a Comment
Happy New Zealand Day!

 
                                The Haast's Eagle, the largest bird of prey (until extinction) attacking a flightless moa (also extinct)

The islands that make up what today is known as New Zealand were, for centuries, uninhabited by people. Due to isolation, the islands hosted many distinct creatures and were dominated by large birds. There were no land mammals, only bats and the marine variety on the coast.

 
                          a Maori warrior                                                               a group of Moriori

Austronesians came from Polynesia sometime between 800 and 1300 A.D, making New Zealand one of the last major land masses to be settled by people. These people organized into groups called hapu. Over time, they came to refer to themselves collectively as Māori. They called the North Island Te Ika a Māui (the fish of Māui) and the South Island Te Wai Pounamu (the waters of jade) or Te Waka a Māui (the canoe of Māui). Around 1500, a group split off and migrated to Rekohu and developed a culture known as Moriori. These people embraced Pacifism which served them poorly when they were massacred and cannibalized by the Maori in the 1830s. The remaining Moriori, who'd adapted to the harsh climate of Rekohu, died out completely in the early 20th century.

   
                                    Able Tasman                                                                               James Cook

February 5, 2008

Posted by phil blankenship, February 5, 2008 07:13pm | Post a Comment
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