Amoeblog

Van Morrison to Perform Astral Weeks!

Posted by Miss Ess, October 2, 2008 04:40pm | Post a Comment
van morrison
I know I've mentioned it several times before but I just can't resist mentioning it again: Van Morrison's Astral Weeks.

I've just heard that he will be performing the album in full next month at the Hollywood Bowl! The dates are Nov 7 and 8. Wow, I am wishing I was an Angeleno right about now.

I'm interested to see what he does with the songs-- knowing Van's at times rather spotty live performances, and the expansive variation that he brings to his songs when he performs them, who knows? I bet he has not played a good portion of the songs off of Astral Weeks in a zillion years. Frankly, I am surprised he agreed to do this, but it's thrilling! He must be pleased that this album is finally getting its due and being praised by the masses, since it was fairly ignored back in 1968.

As a whole, Astral Weeks' improvisational nature makes it more akin to jazz than rock, really, and one thing I am sure of is that Van will bring his spontaneity and lack of restraint to his performances. If you want to read a bit more about the record, click here.

Apparently he is capturing it all on tape (or whatever more ephemeral substance they're using these days) for a DVD, so if you can't make it, rest assured you will be able to catch it at a later date in the comfort of your own home.

Here's a recent performance of "Madame George" -- sounds great to me!

Blame It On The Night

Posted by phil blankenship, October 2, 2008 04:18pm | Post a Comment
Blame It On The Night starring Nick Mancuso  Blame It On The Night key video

Blame It On The Night plot synopsis

Key Video 6726

The Hills Have Eyes

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, October 1, 2008 11:55pm | Post a Comment
necropolis of love the hope lp labelarista records labelnecropolis of love the hope lp label
early everest records labelruben blades buscando america lp labelcolor  everest records label
hitsville records labelmelody mountain records label dan hicks and his hot licks lp label
marito rivera y su grupo bravo lp labelparamount records label lost lake arts records label
june appal recordings record labelthe teardrop explodes record labelsantana record label
summit records labelsierra records label reinsmen sing songs of the trail lpgranite records label edwin starr free to be myself lp

A Little Patience: New folk-rock by Nagisa Ni Te and Karl Blau out now!

Posted by Kelly S. Osato, October 1, 2008 03:06pm | Post a Comment
Earlier this week while I was walking home from a night out with friends I was surprised by a stranger who randomly yelled out to me across an intersection, “How do you do this all the time?” I assumed by the question and the incredulous affectation that colored his shoAxel Rose and his Skateboardut that this fellow had to be the sort of out-of-towner used to strolling casually along level sidewalks, not straining to climb them. Living in San Francisco’s Chinatown for eleven years has provided me with plenty of street-side entertainment in the form of visitors struggling to get from point A to point B and these hapless pedestrians have become common fodder for egregious porchfront commentary among my friends and I, especially the drunk ones falling uphill. I offered the winded tourist no reply, but I began to sing to myself a song that hadn’t invaded my head space for some time, “all we need is just a little patience...

 

What W. Axel Rose and his Guns N’ Roses showed the world with their slowest, most patient song, "Patience," was a sensitive vulnerability, unrestrained by the tired power ballad format, that balanced out all the hollyweird, small-man anger their sleazier hits that flaunted to the top of the charts. "Patience" made it to number four in the US and I know for a fact that it continues to enjoy slurred and spirited karaoke renditions the world over, though, as a choice cut, it bodes ill for the novice due to its length and monotony (Kimberly Starling of The Karaoke Informer says it's one of the top 5 songs that tends to bomb: "It just eludes the average ear and when you get off key on this one it sounds to the ear like a turd in a punch bowl looks to the eye.") However, with "Patience" in mindYosuga by Nagisa Ni Te, I am reminded of two recent, overlooked releases that guild a gentle acoustic sound that is characteristically rock while also spiritually folk: Nagisa Ni Te’s Yosuga and Karl Blau’s Nature's Got A Way.

 

The Employee Interview Part XIX: John Garcia

Posted by Miss Ess, October 1, 2008 02:20pm | Post a Comment
John Garcia
Over 10 years employment, spread across all 3 stores!
New Product Buyer

Miss Ess: What is your pick for best release of 2008 so far?

 
John Garcia: Well, so far it is probably the rather weighty 4-CD box set on Rachel Unthank & The Wintersetthe Cleanfeed label that brought together multi-instrumentalist Anthony Braxton and guitarist Joe Morris together for the first time (Four Improvisations [Duo] 2007). Each disc is one solid uninterrupted hour of improvisation between these two masterful performers. They are both busy players that ironically have a keen sense of space, but they use that space very differently. Listening to them attempt to resolve those differences on the fly is big part of the fun of the album. The critic Whitney Balliett is credited with calling jazz "the sound of surprise." Under the best of circumstances, all great music has that quality somewhere.
 
Also, I am also still quite taken with the new album by the British folk group Rachel Unthank & The Winterset, Bairns. I wrote about it in the upcoming Music We Like (Fall 2008) and just as the Braxton/Morris album is complex and flitting, Unthank & Co. are relatively simple, slow-moving and austere. These qualities asoft machinere their strength, vocally and instrumentally.
 
Oh yeah, and that Soft Machine DVD, Alive In Paris 1970 is pretty remarkable visually, musically and historically. It documents a performance by the rare quintet version of the band recorded for a then-new half-hour French TV music series. They were the first band featured in the series. Their set was so popular that they aired a second show using the unused footage they shot for the first show. Most of the cameras are onstage and backstage, so some of the angles are unusually intimate and intense. It is only slightly marred by the occasional overdubbed cheers and applause that, apparently, were used to disguise some of the sound editing that needed to be done. At least they resisted using the "psychedelic" special effects that intrude on so much documentary and televised footage of the period.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  1323  1324  1325  1326  1327  1328  1329  1330  1331  1332  1333  1334  >>  NEXT