Amoeblog

New Theme Park Opens in China

Posted by Whitmore, May 17, 2009 08:59am | Post a Comment

What happens in Chongqing stays in Chongqing.
 
I can’t imagine this ever happening here in the states, but China is building what is billed as its first sexually explicit theme park, aimed at providing for its visitors better sex education, sexual technique workshops and demonstrations of safe-sex methods.
 
Due to open in the south-western China in the mega-metropolis of Chongqing this coming October, Love Land includes displays of giant genitalia, nude bodies and features an exhibition on the history of sex and sexual practices in other countries as well as a display on how to use condoms properly.
 
At the main entrance is a sign bearing the park's name straddled between a giant pair of women's legs topped by a red thong. The park’s manager, Lu Xiaoqing, was inspired by a similar sex themed park in Jeju, South Korea that is enjoying huge success. Lu Xiaoqing says that Love Land is not only about educating the public but will help adults enjoy a harmonious sex life.
 
Earlier this year, the Chinese government launched a national sex education campaign aimed at breaking taboos, getting more people to seek treatment for sexually transmitted infections and seeking solutions for infertility problems.
 
Since the 1980s sexual attitudes have changed dramatically in China. One research project shows that in Beijing the percentage of people having premarital sex rose from under 16% in 1989 to over 60% in 2004.

70mm

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, May 16, 2009 12:45pm | Post a Comment
Having missed the Egyptian's 70mm presentation of both 2001 and Vertigo last week, I'm going to make the trek out to the Aero on the 23rd to catch Vertigo. My last vacation to San Francisco was heavily influenced by the film; we checked out a few of the landmarks that pop up throughout the winding plot. Anyhow, back to 70mm: A few years back I took my son to a Sleeping Beauty 70mm screening and was blown away. During the 80's I caught quite a few of the major blockbusters (E.T., Raiders, Return of the Jedi etc.) but I most remember the Cinema 21 showing of Lawrence of Arabia back in '89. I remember it was '89 because they played "So Alive" by Love and Rockets during the intermission and I hate that song. Even at 14 I could appreciate what the 70mm projection did for Lawrence of Arabia and I'm sure you'll agree if you too choose to run out to Santa Monica next weekend and catch the sceening of either Lawrence or the Hitchcock classic. While you're at it, tomorrow night they're showing an amazing Noir double as part of their Jules Dassin tribute-- Thieves' Highway and Night and the City!





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Remembering Andy Kaufman

Posted by Whitmore, May 16, 2009 11:51am | Post a Comment


Hugh Van Es 1941 - 2009

Posted by Whitmore, May 16, 2009 11:15am | Post a Comment
Hugh Van Es, a Dutch photojournalist who covered the Vietnam War, capturing some of the most enduring images of the era, has died. Last week he suffered a brain hemorrhage and never regained consciousness. He died on Friday at the Queen Mary Hospital in Hong Kong. Van Es was 67.

One of his most famous photos is that of the fall of Saigon in 1975, showing evacuees scaling a ladder onto a helicopter from a rooftop. The image, in no subtle way, became a metaphor for the United States’ profound policy failures in Vietnam.

Van Es arrived in Hong Kong as a freelance photographer in 1967, joining the South China Morning Post. After a stretch as a photographer for the Associated Press from 1969 to 1972, he covered the last three years of the Vietnam war for United Press International. His first celebrated photo was of a wounded soldier with a tiny cross gleaming against his dark silhouette taken in May of 1969 during the battle of Hamburger Hill.
 
But Van Es’ most lasting image was taken on the final day of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam on April 29, 1975. Van Es was in the Saigon UPI bureau offices when he saw a few dozen Americans climbing a ladder trying to board  one of the CIA’s own Air American helicopters on a rooftop just a few blocks away at 22 Gia Long Street, which sat about a half a mile from the embassy. From his vantage point on the UPI balcony, Van Es captured the scene with a 300mm lens, the longest one he had. The building in the picture was an apartment that housed C.I.A. officials and families and not Saigon’s American Embassy as has been erroneously believed over the years.

This Week At The New Beverly!

Posted by phil blankenship, May 16, 2009 02:45am | Post a Comment
This Week At The New Beverly

The May / June Calendar is NOW online!
http://newbevcinema.com/calendar.cfm

Printed calendars are at the theater - be sure to pick one up for yourself and a few for your friends!


Friday, Saturday & Sunday May 15, 16 & 17



The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951)
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0043456/
dir. Robert Wise, starring Michael Rennie, Patricia Neal, Hugh Marlowe, Sam Jaffe, Billy Gray, Frances Bavier, Lock Martin
featuring a legendary score by Bernard Herrmann 
Fri: 7:30; Sat & Sun: 3:55 & 7:30

The Day The Earth Stood Still was added to the National Film Registry in 1995.

plus a

Feature Length Sci-Fi Trailer Show!
Fri: 9:25; Sat & Sun: 5:50 & 9:25


Friday May 15

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