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Puma And Love-Made Present: What Do You Dance?

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 23, 2009 10:51pm | Post a Comment

Puma and Lovemade have collaborated to present a monthly series of events simply titled the “Puma Monthly Music Series.” For the inaugural event, a special celebration will take place at the Ecco Lounge in Hollywood tomorrow night, Tuesday, March 24, 2009. The two foward-thinking companies have joined to celebrating the launch of Whatdoyoudance.com, a social network dedicated to dance, lifestyle, fashion, art, events, and forward thinking from a dancer's perspective, of course. The new online network was created by dancer and choreographer extraordinaire Fatima Robinson. It is an interactive experience with a forum, an event section, blogs and much more for people to express what’s on their mind, or to simply share information with fellow users.

For this kickoff jam, Lovemade has done what they do best and organized a party reflecting the spirit of this newest venture from Fatima. Lovemade ladies have put together a great lineup of DJs including Rashida (America's Best Dance Crew/ Prince),  DJ Smiles Davis (Ameoba Records), Posso The DJ (Designer of Posso the Spat) and DJ Wendy City (Lovemade), all of whom will be providing the evening’s soundtrack, while Mark “The Cobrasnake” Hunter will be in the house capturing the action.

With that being said, be sure to look sharp, be prepared to boogie your heart out, and come celebrate the launch of “What Do You Dance?” with all of us!

What Do You Dance?

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 17, 2009 11:31am | Post a Comment

Ever heard a record that made you want to get down like this little kid? The first record I ever bought on vinyl was Michael Jackson’s Off the Wall. I was 10, it was 1994 and the record was still bumping on the radio fifteen years after its original release. New, old, fresh, or dusty, the music got to me, put me in a mood I was unable to describe at the time. My mother had never seen me so intoxicatingly excited about anything before; she didn’t really know how to react. She worked hard with a no nonsense policy always enforced around the house. She gave me the money I asked for to get the record just to get me out of the house. “Now go on outside and play and stop pestering me,” she barked after slapping the dough in the palm of my hand. Out I went. After buying the record and enough candy to last me ‘till the end of time, I raced my bike across town – a very small town -- as fast as I could to my grandparents’ house, where I retreated to the basement for some serious privacy. My grandfather, who used to own a record store, had a lonely turntable set up at the end of the long, terribly lit basement for special occasions just like this. I got my boogie on for a couple hours, doped up on food coloring and high-fructose corn syrup, poor lighting and all.

It wasn’t long before music got to me the same way the youngest member of the Jackson 5 did. In 1995, just one year after my first magical music moment, I discovered Prince. My cousin let me borrow 1999 on cassette with the promise I return it promptly. 9 months and 101 excuses later, she was forced to steal it back from me. Prince was my forbidden fruit. Never listened to him out loud, always played him in my Walkman for fear my mother would forbid me from listening to it. I’ll admit, the vulgarity and promiscuity that Prince exudes is a bit much for any 11-year-old, but like Michael Jackson, all I ever wanted to do was dance. I had to listen to music that made me want to move, shimmy and shake ‘till the exhaustion kicked in and forced me to call it quits. Lyrics be damned-- I didn’t understand what the heck they were talking about anyway, it was gibberish to me. It was about the beat, the rhythm, and the evoked emotion.

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Rootbeer Please!

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 10, 2009 11:16am | Post a Comment

Ever listen to the same song on repeat for like 2, 6, 9 hours straight? It happens; music is intoxicating like that sometimes and everyone’s heard a song that spoke directly to him or her at one time or another. Maybe it moved you deeply and in return you treasured it dearly and barked hysterically at anyone who tried to interrupt the connection between your ears and the speakers. At that moment in time for you, the listener, that song is like the ninth wonder of the world. Subsequently, without proper headgear, for an innocent bystander catching all those repeated listenings, it is considered intolerable cruelty. Since I didn’t put anyone through that type of torture and utter misery I’ll rest easy tonight. Although there is this obnoxious ringing ear thing I’m currently suffering from due to listening to the same track today at an inappropriately loud volume for an inappropriately long amount of time.

The track I just couldn't get enough of: “Girlies” by the Cornerstone signed super rapper/producer/hipster duo Rootbeer. Their EP, Pink Limousine, drops today, March 10th. Tuesday, if you need a calendar, 2009 if you need a clue…just here to help. Their sound is light hearted, back to basics hip hop: simple, common man, catchy street talk, irresistible hooks laced with a side of cotton candy, and head bobbing beats to make you scream bananas, have your chocolate cake and eat it too. It’s like the brilliant wit and playfulness that was Kid n' Play or Will Smith and DJ Jazzy Jeff on their debut, Parents Just Don’t Understand, blended with the indisputable freshness that was Young MC and Tone Loc. So, go cop Rootbeer’s EP cause they’re bringing the goodness. Put me in a better mood than my very disappointing water pressure did this morning.  

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My Current Ten

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 6, 2009 09:47pm | Post a Comment




Diplo: Decent Work For Decent Pay (hip-hop)









   Madlib: Beat Konducta Vol. 5-6: A Tribute to... (hip-hop)









Señor Coconut: Coconut FM Legendary Latin Tunes (electronica)










88-keys: The Death of Adam (hip-hop)











Rodriguez: Cold Fact (rock)










Nightmares On Wax: Thought So... (electronica)








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Euro Chick Rebellion: Part II

Posted by Smiles Davis, March 3, 2009 02:38pm | Post a Comment

Music aficionados are just as hyped as I am about the return of Ms. Dynamite. She unofficially released her first single since her 2005 album release, Judgment Days. "Bad Gyal" was dropped on BBC radio where adoring fans recorded and reloaded the whole minute and some change teaser up on the Internet for everyone to ravage. The track was produced by garage don "Sticky Booo!" Stickey. It sounds as if M.I.A and some serious dancehall riddim married and had a lyrical baby, a true bundle of joy.

Salaam “The Chameleon” Remi
--pronounced "ray me"-- produced Ms. Dynamite's phenomenal debut album, A Little Deeper, which reached number 10 on the UK charts back in ‘03. How does one sum up Remi in anything less than a novel? He's worked with veterans like Santana and Nas as well as newbies Jazmine Sullivan and Chrisette Michelle. Mr. Remi was the mastermind behind that track for the Fugees no one could seem to get off the tip of their tongue: "Fu-Gee-La." Amy Winehouse's platinum selling debut album, Frank, had his name written all over it, not only as a producer, but as a song-writer as well. His pops was a music man himself. Van Gibbs found a nice cozy spot arranging, producing, leading bands, and playing guitar for artists like Harry Belafonte and Gloria Gaynor. As my Uncle Jerry would say in his fast talking, dirty Southern accent, "That's sum good blood right thar."

Ms. Dynamite has yet to release word on when the new album is set to drop or exactly who else is working on the production side, but rumor has it there is a larger two-step grime influence than her previous works. The hard core grime scene in the UK is somewhat similar to the Miami Bass scene here in the states. It disappeared from the radar for some time, but back in the 80's and the 90's it was often referred to as "booty music" or "dirty rap," with Luke and 2 Live Crew as the poster boys. We've recently seen the emergence of Miami Bass in mainstream success thanks to artists like Diplo, who fuses it together with his southern roots, trip hop and reggae dub. Grime or no grime, I'm excited about Ms. Dynamite's return to the spotlight. Apparently, Lily Allen is too. The rebellious youngster with a tutu said it brought her tears of utter happiness to hear about the impending return Ms. Dynamite. Lady Sovereign, my next subject, is equally excited. She can attest to knowing a little something about that grime scene I mentioned, especially because she reps as the only white female rapper to emerge into the spotlight from the tight knit circle.
 
Lady Sovereign was signed to Def Jam back in 2005 by Jay-Z after he made her drop acapella freestyle for him. She was the first white female MC ever signed to the label. Her debut album, Public Warning, dropped in October of '06 and introduced her to international recognition. The video for the song "Love Me or Hate Me" reached #1 on the US (and original) version of MTV's Total Request Live, making her the first British artist to ever do so. The 5 ft 1, pint-size Londoner with a fiercely independent creative spirit says she's never been your average rapper. If I had to describe her sound, I'd say Lady Sovereign is like Missy Elliot on pop rocks and hot tamales: rebelliously witty, sporty spiced, and relentlessly unattached to the social standards of femininity and sexuality. Her new album, Jigsaw, drops in the US on April 7th and April 13th in the UK on her very own label Miget Records. Her hit new single "So Human" samples what I believe is The Cure's 1985 smash "Close to Me" from The Head on The Door album. The first single from Jigsaw, "I Got You Dancing" dropped late last year with a fun packed video which happily marries a Crayola box out of School House Rock with urban street life. Just had to post. Till next time... chew the corners off.

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