Weekly Roundup: La Sera, Matt Kivel, James Supercave, Kneebody and Daedelus, Tulips, Painted Palms

Posted by Billy Gil, October 30, 2015 10:07am | Post a Comment

La Sera Music For Listening To Teaser

la seraPower-pop goddess Katy Goodman is coming out with a new one called Music For Listening To, due March from Polyvinyl. The album seems to follow suit with 2014’s excellent, punk-fueled Hour of the Dawn, recorded in just eight days by none other than Ryan Adams (in between his stints at this year’s Coachella), along with guitarist Todd "Totally Tod" Wisenbaker with drummer Nate Lotz. Read more via Rollingstone, and check out an album teaser below.


Matt Kivel – “Janus”

matt kivelL.A.-based singer/songwriter Matt Kivel has a new album on the way called Janus, out Feb. 5 on Driftless. His third album finds Kivel teaming with Alasdair Roberts on production duties to record in Roberts’ native Glasgow with local musicians. “Janus” is delicately rendered with Kivel’s creaking voice, fingerpicked acoustic guitar, and light piano and string accompaniment, yet its warm shades mask dark lyrics, as Kivel sings at one point, “I feel nothing close to comfort in you.” Listen via Stereogum.

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Album Picks: Joanna Newsom, Fuzz, Pure Bathing Culture

Posted by Billy Gil, October 23, 2015 12:07pm | Post a Comment

Joanna NewsomDivers

joanna newsom divers lpJoanna Newsom’s first album in five years finds the musician lending her ornate songcraft and magical imagery to an album that at its plainest, examines relationships and the effects of the passage of time. “Anecdotes” begins the album with woodland noise and shortly reintroduces Newsom’s piano, harp and uncommon croon, her lyrics painting slices of life of a soldier laying land mines and returning home, summing up the sentiment it portrays with the line, “Anecdotes cannot say what Time may do.” Newsom’s lyrics are as inscrutable as ever—“Sapokanikan” refers to a Native American village that once stood where Greenwich Village now lies and references Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poem about a fallen Egyptian pharaoh, “Ozymandias”—but they’re in service of her central theme, as she sings, “the records they left are cryptic at best, lost in obsolescence.” The arrangements by Newsom, Nico Muhly, Ryan Francesconi and Dave Longstreth (Dirty Projectors) tickle the songs with orchestral brushes and lend rock pulse to songs like “Leaving the City.” Shorter songs appear, like “The Things I Say,” a downtrodden, countrified piano ditty with lyrics both direct (“I’m ashamed of half the things I say”) and fanciful (“When the sky goes thinkin’ Paris, France, do you think of the girl who used to dance when you’d frame the movement within your hands”) that ends in a rain of beaming guitars. These serve to as breathers before sinking into epics like “Divers,” which gives Newsom’s harp and malleable voice room to roam as she intones, “How do you choose your life? How do you choose the time you must exhale and kick and writhe?” Like Newsom’s previous work, Divers demands close attention. Her albums are the antithesis of instant gratification, which is perversely likely why she’s become so popular as an out-of-time balladeer despite sounding more medieval than millennial—her songs beg that you drop what you’re doing, lest you miss one of her witticisms or whimsies. It’s a strangely soothing effect, harkening back to the time of following lyric sheets and sitting to listen to music as a solitary activity. Despite being seeped in melancholia, Divers ends on the somewhat positive note of “Time As a Symptom.” Newsom cries about the “joy of life” as owls hoot and birds chirp in the background, declaring, “the moment of your greatest joys sustains.” Divers may be concerned with the fleeting nature of time, but it’s a convincing bid at artistic permanence.

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Weekly Roundup: W-X, jennylee, Summer Twins

Posted by Billy Gil, October 23, 2015 08:23am | Post a Comment

W-X – “Brazilian Worm Band”

tim presleyLike his onetime bandmate in Hair, Ty Segall, Tim Presley doesn’t seem to sleep. Between his loads of great albums as White Fence, who released a new album last year, and his new collaboration with Cate Le Bon, DRINKS, which released an album earlier this year, you’d think he wouldn’t have time for another project. But here we have W-X, a new solo project from Presley. From the sounds of this first song, he’s interested here in making outsider noise pop. “Brazilian Worm Band” sounds like a demented toy factory on the fritz, as broken-down vintage moogs run amok. Great stuff. W-X is due Nov. 6 on Castle Face.


jennylee “never” video

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Mick Rock's David Bowie Photo Book 'The Rise of David Bowie' on Sale From Amoeba

Posted by Billy Gil, October 21, 2015 06:55pm | Post a Comment

david bowie photo book taschen mick rockMick Rock’s massive tome of a photo book on David Bowie is now for sale at Amoeba Music.

The tall,16-pound book features a hologram cover and more than 300 pages of photographs. It sells for $700, but it’s limited to only 1,972 copies, signed by Rock and Bowie. Look for the book in the display case next to the counters at Amoeba Hollywood!

Rock famously shot many musicians during the 1970s, from Lou Reed to Queen and Blondie’s Debbie Harry. Between 1972 and 1973, Rock was Bowie’s official photographer, while Bowie was taking the world by storm with his celebrated album Hunky Dory and his emerging Ziggy Stardust persona.

The book includes pictures for press and album jackets along with intimate backstage photos, around 50 percent of which are said to be unseen by the public.

The book sale coincides with the exhibition “Mick Rock: Shooting for Stardust. The Rise of David Bowie & Co.” at TASCHEN Gallery, which is located at 8070 Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles. The exhibit runs through Oct. 30.

Read an interview with Rock about his time photographing Bowie via Rolling Stone. See a couple of photos from the book below. Shop more collectible books from Amoeba here.

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The 10 Creepiest Kids Movies

Posted by Billy Gil, October 19, 2015 05:04pm | Post a Comment

10 creepiest kids movies

Our childhoods are littered with films that, for whatever reason, were in many ways equally as terrifying as their R-rated counterparts. Around Halloween, it’s always fun to revisit these movies and think about the times when Disney took a dark turn and parents were a lot more lax about what they let their kids watch. Here are 10 creepy cult movies, box office bombs and genuine hits that were probably a lot scarier than they needed to be.

The Adventures of Mark Twain (1985)

the adventures of mark twin blu-rayClaymation already is and always has been disturbing to me. I couldn’t figure out what was going on with Gumby, and I didn’t want to know. The Adventures of Mark Twain doesn’t seem that creepy on the surface, telling the story of such beloved characters as Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn as they meet Twain himself, who’s on an airship to meet up with Halley’s Comet (which was a big deal in 1985 when this was released, as the comet became visible to the naked eye the following year in a once-in-a-lifetime event). So far, so good. But anyone who saw the film as a child knows there’s a disturbing scene based in part on Twain’s story “The Chronicle of Young Satan” in which a headless suit of armor carrying a mask claims to be the devil himself and capable of easily wiping out humans (“People are of no value,” is his existential response to smooshing some clay people). It’s always good to make sure that children learn life is futile early on. Read an interview with director Will Vinton here.

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