Amoeblog

The Gospel of Hip Hop According to KRS ONE, Part VI -- Hip Hop as World's Savior, The Gospel & KRS in the Year 2040

Posted by Billyjam, July 28, 2010 09:00am | Post a Comment

At 6pm today (July 28th), KRS One (aka The Teacha & longtime ambassador of all things Hip Hop) will celebrate the publication of his in-depth book, The Gospel of Hip Hop: First Instrument presented by KRS One for the Temple of Hip Hop (Powerhouse Books), with a special Amoeba Music Hollywood appearance. Unlike most Amoeba instores, which tend to be music concerts followed by a meet and greet/CD signing, today's standing room only KRS  instore event, to be held in the SoCal store's cozy Jazz Room, will involve the veteran Hip Hop artist, activist, educator, author giving a lecture related to The Gospel of Hip Hop, taking some questions from the audience, and signing copies of his book. It is still possible to get in on today's special event. For full information & exact details click here. And if you are unable to attend today's event but would like to purchase a copy of the book online from Amoeba you can do so by clicking here. If you have any questions that you would like KRS to answer please write them in the comments below, and, as moderator of today's KRS lecture, I will do my best to have the man answer your question.

Today's KRS One Amoeblog is the sixth and final part in the series leading up to his instore and includes another audio excerpt from the recent Amoeblog exclusive KRS phone interview. After spending even a short time in the company of KRS you quickly realize that to say he does not take Hip Hop lightly is quite an understatement. The man lives and breathes it. His famous line, "rap is something you do, Hip Hop is something to live," are truly words that he lives by. In conversation he mentions Hip Hop continually and clearly never stops thinking about it and its ramifications. "I think Hip Hop is the savior of American KRS ONEsociety; Hip Hop itself brings cultures together because it gives people a chance to talk and to really see what the other guy is thinking and in a peaceful way," he told me when I asked about the real meaning of Hip Hop as a culture and a lifestyle.

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The Gospel of Hip Hop According to KRS ONE, Part V -- On His "Divine Intelligence," Dealing with Detractors, and Satanists & Hip Hop

Posted by Billyjam, July 27, 2010 04:05pm | Post a Comment

In celebration of Hip Hop legend KRS One's recently unleashed 800 + page book, The Gospel of Hip Hop: First Instrument presented by KRS ONE for the Temple of Hip Hop published by Powerhouse Books, the Teacha himself will make a special exclusive Amoeba Music Hollywood appearance tomorrow (Wednesday, July 28th) at 6pm. He will present a lecture, Q+A session, and book signing for those lucky to gain access to the standing room only Jazz Room section of the Southern California Amoeba store.

For more information on how you can still attend this unique Amoeba instore appearance by the man who literally wrote the good book on Hip Hop, click here. And if you cannot attend this one off event but would like to purchase a copy of the book online from Amoeba and have KRS sign it for you, you can do so by clicking here. Also, should you have any questions that you would like presented to KRS, please write them in the comments below and, as moderator of his lecture at Amoeba Hollywood, I will do my best to have him answer your question.

Meantime, this is the fifth in the six part KRS One Amoeblog interview, with each installment leading up to the KRS instore on July 28th. On the topic of the Gospel of Hip Hop, KRS One insists, "If we are going to create a kulture, an international kulture, then we are going to have to dig a little deeper than rap music CDs and Wild Style movie watching. We're gonna have to actually know, to the deepest aspect of our being, who we are and what we mean. And this is done in mathematics. This is done through language. This is done through gnostic knowledge, dreams, visions, miracles. And to live that even you have to live a dangerous life. You have to live on the edge. You might get arrested. Your friend may die. And people don't want to go that path. They don't want to investigate anything that deep. So for me there is no debate. I have delved deep into Hip Hop for my own survival by the way, love of craft, and my own survival."

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The Gospel of Hip Hop According to KRS ONE, Part IV -- Thinking Very Deeply, Favorite Hip Hop Artists & the N Word

Posted by Billyjam, July 25, 2010 07:07am | Post a Comment

Boogie Down Productions "My Philosophy" (1988)

That 22 year old Boogie Down Productions (BDP) era quote of KRS-One's that goes, 'I think very deeply,' taken from the song/single "My Philosophy" off the 1988 BDP album By All Means Boogie Down ProductionsNecessary (Jive/RCA), remains true to this day. KRS-One really does think very deeply about every minute detail and aspect of Hip Hop and he digs deeper than most are prepared to, or are even interested in doing. As he said in the Amoeblog interview, "I dig deep: I'm rapping, I'm emcee'ing. What the hell is emcee'ing? Rakim said 'E M C E E, a repetition of words, check out my melody,' so why did he say E M C E E and not M C? What's the difference? I know other people didn't really care about what the difference was. They just wanted the money. But me, I ran and grabbed the Oxford English dictionary with a magnifying glass on it and I looked up E M. What is E M and what is C E E? And then what is I N? And what does it mean to take the G off of I N G? When did this happen in English language? Who else did this? Why are we thinking like this? No one asks those questions. I ask those questions."

At this point I asked KRS a question. Who are some of his favorite emcees or Hip Hop artists in general? He said that there were too many to mention every one, but that he counts Supernatural among his favorites, quickly adding, "People like Chris Rock I think encompass the kulture of Hip Hop. He applies the sight of Hip Hop to another medium and you could see Hip Hop in another way by looking at him." However, KRS was somewhat critical of both Will Smith and Queen Latifah, not as emcees but as Queen Latifahhigh profile movie actors in a position to represent Hip Hop more than they do.

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The Town Part II: Interview with Oakland's Bikes 4 Life's Founder Tony Coleman

Posted by Billyjam, July 24, 2010 02:55pm | Post a Comment
Bikes 4 Life 3rd Annual Peace Ride - July 24th 2010

Oakland's unique Bikes 4 Life, which later today presents its 3rd Annual Bike Ride for Peace & Bike-In Movie Night with a free screening of The Warriors, is yet another thing about The Town (aka Oakland) that helps make this long slept-on East Bay neighbor of San Francisco such a wonderfully unique & special place to live or visit. And the goal of the Amoeblog's The Town series is to focus on many of the Bikes 4 Lifefine Oakland organizations and businesses (for profit & non-profit) that have either been around for a few years such as Bikes 4 Life, or for a good many years such as Rent-A-Relic, or else ones have only just cropped up in the past several months such as Beer Revolution and The Layover (both to be Amoeblogged about here in the upcoming weeks).

Earlier today I caught up with Tony Coleman, who is the founder and executive director of this Oakland bicycle based organization -- someone who I originally met through hip-hop several years ago and who has always been a really cool, positive person-- one with his community always first in his mind. The interview with Tony follows and includes the specifics on this evening's bike ride and movie screening.

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Hip-Hop Rap Up 07:23:10: Rick Ross, Kero One, Curren$y, Take Back the Mic Bay Area

Posted by Billyjam, July 23, 2010 05:46pm | Post a Comment
Amoeba Music Berkeley Weekly Hip-Hop Top Five Chart: 07:23:10


1) The Roots How I Got Over (Def Jam)

2) Big Boi Sir Lucious Left Foot... The Son of Chico Dusty (Def Jam)

3) Eminem Recovery (Aftermath, Interscope, Shady)

4) Curren$y Pilot Talk (Blu Roc, Def Jam)

5) Tie between three:
  -  Drake Thank Me Later (Cash Money Records)
 -  Rick Ross Teflon Don (Def Jam)
  - Nas + Damian Marley Distant Relatives  
   (Republic, Universal)

Thanks to both Inti and Evan at the Berkeley Amoeba Music, who star in the video below, for this week's hip-hop chart and honorable mentions/picks. As Inti mentions in the clip, still holding steady in sales are The Roots, Big Boi, Eminem, Drake, and Nas & Damian Marley. Meanwhile, the new entries include Rick Ross' Teflon Don, the Miami artist's fourth full length release following 2006's Port Of Miami, 2008's Trilla, and last year's Deeper Than Rap. The new album features such guests as Ne-Yo, members of the Miami-based Triple-C (Carol City Cartel), Jay-Z, Kanye West, Chrisette Michelle, Drake, T.I., and Raphael Sadiq. And in case, like me, you were fooled into thinking that MC Hammer, whose name appears on the sticker on the cover of the new CD, also appears on the new release, he doesn't; instead there is the song "MC Hammer (feat. Gucci Mane)" (audio sample below).

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