Amoeblog

Rest In Peace "Lord Of Garbage" Kim Fowley

Posted by Billyjam, January 15, 2015 09:30pm | Post a Comment

Kim Fowley: Garbage Man in A Vinyl Wonderland


Sad news surfaced earlier today that producer, musician, writer, manager, and music impressario extraordinaire Kim Fowley died as a result of bladder cancer. He was 75 years old. While he was a tireless artist and part of the music world for five decades with stacks of records credited to him in varying capacities, Kim Fowley will best be remembered as an integral part of the LA music scene of the sixties and seventies including, most notably, being the producer and promoter/ambassador of The Runaways.

The animated and passionate Fowley remained active right up until very recently, even working with Little Steven on his 

weekend Sirius XM satellite radio show Underground Garage until just last week. Two years ago his book Lord Of Garbage was published by Kicks Books. The engaging video above (Kim Fowley: Garbage Man in a Vinyl Wonderland) is the book's corresponding video in which the aging but never relenting rocker shares his inspiring insights, memories, and love of the grooves and music, citing his "favorite record of all time" as Jerry Lee Lewis' "High School Confidential," which "tied with" several others. The 43 minute low budget video includes Fowley going through his record collection (his own and others) and sharing insights on his life and his love of rock & roll (even his sales pitch to sell said records). It's really really good and worth watching for a sense of who Kim Fowley was.

Continue reading...

Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: Dave Paul's 1990 KCSF Hip-Hop Top 40

Posted by Billyjam, January 13, 2015 05:44pm | Post a Comment


Following my uncovering a 25 year old KCSF San Francisco hip-hop playlist (above) from David Paul I invited the longtime Bay Area DJ/promoter/label CEO/publisher to be a guest Amoeblogger this week for the Hip-Hop History Tuesdays segment and to bring us back, via his memories, to that time period (March 1990) in the genre that historically sat smack in the middle of the so-called Golden Era of hip-hop. Here is what Dave Paul had to share about his playlist from a quarter century ago - some songs with accompanying videos.

Wow, seeing this playlist brings back memories. This was when I did a Friday radio show at KCSF (City College of San Francisco) from 8am to 2am every week. It wasn’t on radio waves but rather broadcast on cable TV, Viacom 25. March 15th, 1990 was way before I launched The Bomb Hip-Hop Magazine (that wouldn't be until October 1991). First, I’ll start with the songs that I am now embarassed that I played and charted at that time: "Shake The House" by Misa: she was a white girl rapper, way before Iggy Azelea. I probably played it cause Big Ed (Sleeping Bag/Fresh Records Bay Area rep) and DJ EFX (Mind Motion’s brother) mixed it. Then there's "Somebody Farted" by Bobby Jimmy.  I probably just found it funny. I guess when you’re in your early 20’s this is hilarious. Then we have "U Can’t Touch This" by MC Hammer. I have no excuse other than he was local (same with Oaktown 357 except "Juicy Gotcha Crazy" was catchy). Now onto the tracks that I am proud I was playing back then. Here they are with accompanying videos:

"Buddy" by De La Soul - this needs no line up. Native Tongues in da house!

MLK Jr Day 2015 Events in the Bay and LA

Posted by Billyjam, January 12, 2015 05:14pm | Post a Comment

With this year being the 50th anniversary of the historic 1965 Selma to Montgomery freedom marches this year's MLK Jr Day 2015 events all over the country will take on extra importance. There are countless events happening all over the US and California. Here a handful of those taking place in LA and the Bay Area including a comic book event in San Francisco.

MLK Jr Day 2015 is day two of the Black Comix Arts Festival whose goal is to celebrate the creativity and subjectivity of African Americans in the comic arts and popular visual culture. Open to all ages, it will include a grand exposition, special guest artist presentations, film screening, and activities for kids. The event kicks off the day before (Sunday, January 18) and happens both days at the San Francisco Public Library's main library and at the Metreon. More information and times click here.

Day of service in Oakland. Something that's become increasingly popular over the years is inviting folks (with the day off work or school) to participate in a day of service - typically doing clean up work on public beaches or parks. Tapping into that theme is the MLK Day of Service 2015 at Shepherds Canyon, Oakland where the goal of the day is to transforming "a former dump into a place of natural beauty." Takes place on MLK Jr Day from 9am to 12:30pm. Volunteers should meet at the Escher Gate, 5881 Escher Drive, Oakland. More info.

Continue reading...

Ava DuVernay's "Selma" & New Mike Brown/Ferguson Documentary Share MLK's Message of A Need For Change

Posted by Billyjam, January 11, 2015 11:49pm | Post a Comment

David Oyelowo as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the Ava DuVarney directed Selma


There's a memorable scene in the new film Selma where "A Change Is Gonna Come" comes on the car radio in the background - kind of faintly but still enough to hear it and to feel the soul of the song thanks to both the late great Sam Cooke's hauntingly beautiful voice and the powerful message of a promise of hope that the 1963 recorded song delivers. That desired need for change for African Americans is something that is as relevant today as it was five decades ago! Indeed the release of the new Ava DuVarney directed film Selma could not be more timely; and not just that it was scheduled to open coming up on Martin Luther King Jr. Day but considering how the issues of civil rights for African Americans in the sixties, that are the subject of this wonderful film, have become so ever-relevant again in 2015.

Opened to wide release on Friday (Jan 9, 2015) the emotionally charged film is a dramatization of the Selma to Montgomery, Alabama voting rights marches of 1965 that were led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (played to perfection by British actor David Oyelowo in an Oscar worthy performance) and by members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). Furthermore for me personally the timing of catching a screening of Selma this past week was even more perfect since earlier on that very same evening, at The National Black Theatre in Harlem, I had attended a screening of a similarly themed but totally different film; the incendiary new documentary The Mike Brown Rebellion: Resistance in Ferguson. That low-budget - yet nonetheless powerful - DIY documentary, produced by the NYC based Rebel Diaz Arts Collective who had traveled down to Ferguson, Missiouri in the days following the August 2014 police shooting death of the unarmed Mike Brown, succeeded in its goal of presenting an alternate, front-lines perspective view of that put forward by the mainstream news outlets, as well as a making a lasting "tool for education and starting discussions around policing…" In fact immediately following the screening of the film in Harlem, that was presented by the Zulu Nation, those in attendance including one of the filmmakers Rod Starz and hip-hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa joined a discussion on the topics raised in the documentary. 

Continue reading...

The Poet Azeem's "Postera" Delivers A Message of Encouragement To Artists

Posted by Billyjam, January 11, 2015 09:15pm | Post a Comment

Throughout The Poet Azeem's performance of Postera today at the Stella Adler Studio of Acting on West 27th Street in Manhattan, one recurring message was to be true to yourself. And if you're an artist, be 100% true to your art - no matter what - and don't sell out. That message came from an artist who truly practices what he preaches. Azeem has always being about his art first and foremost - dating all the way back two plus decades ago when the NJ born artist began his career in the Bay Area.  Today's Postera performance - the final of a few to play in Manhattan this week - was presented as a "uniquely triumphant story of a modern misfit on an alternative path" in life with Chapter III of the film portion titled "The Misfit King" which is also the name of a song by Azeem with the German based Ancient Astronauts under the collective name Band Of Broken Puppets. Today's performance blended Azeem's semi-autobiographical tale with him both on stage and projected onto the stage's film screen via the "visual narrative" collaborative aid of NYC based filmmaker Zak Cedarholm. As well as tracing his own personal journey, coming of age in the 80's and kickstarting his music career in the 90's, Azeem offered his own firsthand political and social observations as well such as how the American crack academic coincided with the rise of the prison complex.

One the many inspiring moments of today's mixed-media show was when the New Jersey born, longtime hip-hop emcee / spoken word artist encouraged his fellow artists to go all out in their creativity. "If you see an envelope, push it!" stressed The Poet Azeem to all his fellow artists. And following the 45 minute performance piece today at the midtown theater the house lights came up and Azeem and his visuals collaborator Zak Cedarholm opened the floor up to questions and discussion. Cedarholm talked about how he initially met up with Azeem a year and half ago and how the two clicked creatively and hence set about making a special type of film together (see trailer below) that even includes some old Bay Area era footage of Azeem. He noted that their ultimate goal is of making full-length movie of Postera. He and Azeem then noted how they hope to tour with the mixed media piece and have accompanying workshops for others to build from it. Azeem said that he would hope that aspiring artists would see this work and that it might inspire them to follow their creative dreams and goals. Now that's what I call giving back and spreading the love and the art.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  >>  NEXT