The Ultimate One Album Wonders Directory

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 23, 2015 08:59am | Post a Comment

One Album Wonders

The vinyl LP was introduced by Columbia Records in 1948 but the 45 inch single remained the primary media for recorded music until 1966, when LPs overtook them, marking the dawn of the Album Era.
For a variety of reasons, many bands of the Album Era only released one full-length LP, making them “one album wonders.” 

I began the series, One Album Wonders, in July 2014 (the year digital downloads first overtook aluminum discs in sales) and since then have written of about 60 bands whose recorded output was mostly confined to a single album. I had planned on writing about hundreds more but the plug has been pulled so I’ve decided instead to publish my personally compiled directory of them before my time at Amoeba ends in December. Enjoy! 


A Passing Fancy (A Passing Fancy - 1968), A Witness (I Am John’s Pancreas - 1986), A-II-Z (The Witch Of Berkeley - Live - 1980), A'La Rock (Indulge - 1990), Aceium (Wicked Metal - 2004), The Aerovons (Resurrection - 2003), The Affair (Yes Yes To You - 2006), Afterlife (Surreality - 1992), Agentz (Stick to Your Guns - 1986), Aidean (Promises - 1988), Alamo (Alamo - 1970), Alien (Cosmic Fantasy - 1983), Alien (The Pleasure of Leisure - 1998), Alistair Terry (Yonge at Heart - 1985), Alkana (Welcome to My Paradise - 1978), Alkatraz (Doing a Moonlight - 1976), Allen Collins Band (Here, There and Back - 1983), Alliance (We Could Get Used To This - 1988), Alonzo Cruz (Blind Troubador of Oaxaca - 1956), Alpha Centauri (Alpha Centauri - 1977), American Noise (American Noise - 1980), Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe (Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe - 1989), The Animated Egg (The Animated Egg - 1967), Andy Rock (Into the Night - 2012), Annihilation Absolute (Cities - 1985), April 16th (Sleepwalking - 1989), Arcadia (So Red the Rose - 1985), Armageddon (Illusion - 1971), Arzachel (Arzachel - 1969), ATC (Planet Pop - 2000), Avalanche (Pray For The Sinner - 1985), Aviator (Aviator - 1986), The Awful Truth (The Awful Truth - 1990), and Axtion (Look Out for the Night - 1985)

Continue reading...

They Sing Sea Songs Down by the Seashore -- Vegetarian Sea Shanties of a Sort

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 17, 2015 09:03am | Post a Comment
"Colin Hunter" "their only harvest" (1879)
Their Only Harvest by Colin Hunter (1879)

I wrote a guide to sea vegetables over at my blog. As a companion piece here at the Amoeblog, I thought I’d compile a guide to modern day sea shanties by vegetarian (or former vegetarian, in some cases) songwriters or bands with vegetarian members.
Seaweed Gatherers (1926) by Harold Harvey
Seaweed Gatherers (1926) by Harold Harvey 

Belle & Sebastian - “Ease Your Feet in the Sea”

Blur - "This is a Low"

Bob Marley And The Wailers - “High Tide Or Low Tide”

Eurodisco Legends Joy Are Coming to Orange County

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 9, 2015 03:21pm | Post a Comment
Joy Hello

group Joy are scheduled to perform live in Santa Ana on 5 December (Saint Nicholas Eve/Krampusnacht) at the Yost Theater. They will perform hits including “Touch By Touch,” “Hello,” “Japanese Girls,” “Valerie,” “Im In Love,” “Countdown of Love,” and more. Buy tickets now as there are only 1,000 and they’re going fast.

One Album Wonders: Mad Season

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 2, 2015 02:31pm | Post a Comment
Mad Season

The Scientists were likely both grunge's inventors and the genre's first supergroup (members had previously played in Cheap Nasties, Slick City Boys, and Victims). However, if one hears “grunge supergroup” they more likely think of Temple of the Dog, a one album wonder the members of which had previously played in Seattle grunge bands including Soundgarden, Green River, and Skin Yard (as well as the not-really-grunge one album wonders Mother Love Bone and not-at-all Seattle - since they were from San Diego - Bad Radio). Mad Season, when they're remembered, are that other grunge supergroup. 
Mad Season's Above

Mad Season arrived pretty late on the scene, toward the end of 1994. In April of that year, Kurt Cobain had killed himself but alternative and music had by then long ceased to be anything remotely underground and was resolutely mainstream. In 1992, MTV had replaced 120 Minutes host Dave Kendall with, Lewis Largent and the program, which had previously showcased a host of bands playing diverse music became a parade of bands whose members dressed like Largent, in shorts, combat boots, flannel, and backwards baseball cap. If that wasn't mainstream enough, MTV also launched the ironically named Alternative Nation as a showcase for the manufactured corporate guitar rock favored by soulful dudebros (eg Candlebox and Stone Temple Pilots).

In 1993 Marc Jacobs had served up grunge realness on the catwalk for Perry Ellis -- five years after Martin Margiela had pretty much done the same thing, serving up a fantasy of homeless fashion for the one percent. By 1994 pre-ripped jeans and combat boots were part of a uniform adopted by the knavescene and celebrities like Brad Pitt, Johnny Depp, and Keanu Reeves. Their female counterparts, such as emaciated supermodel Kate Moss,  were used to promote heroin chic. After not having heard any interesting new American rock in what seemed like forever, I gave up on it. I would hear the names of new bands, including Toadies, Seven Mary Three, Sky Cries Mary, Jars of Clay, Primitive Radio Gods, Eels, DC Talk, Duncan Sheik, Sister Hazel, Local H, and more. All would have their champions but like every Steven Spielberg movie since Raiders of the Lost Ark, if I gave any a chance I'd almost certainly be underwhelmed. 

10 Spooky Musical Pieces for Halloween

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 26, 2015 03:33pm | Post a Comment
Vintage Halloween Masks

At one of the several jobs at which I work we’ve started listening to a Halloween playlist from Spotify or Pandora and like all of those pre-fab playlists it sucks. There aren’t that many explicitly Halloween songs so whomever programed it resorted to tossing in things like Duran Duran’s “Hungry Like the Wolf" because what's scarier than a hungry Brummie? The Searchers’ “Love Potion No. 9” is not scary and although it's a bit mad, neither is Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’s “I Put a Spell on You” -- both apparently chosen because, you know, potions and spells and such. That sort of thinking is also why David Seville’s deeply annoying (but not scary) “Witch Doctor” now haunts every facet of my brain. Basically this playlist is 90% the kind of stuff collected by Dr. Retarded, novelty record collector and chief head of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital.

I like spooky music and horror films (although they're sadly almost never scary) so this kind of lazy mix-making gets no “squeaks” from me. There is so much more appropriate music out there. The other night some friends and I went to the Million Dollar Theatre to see Dawn of the Dead and before the show former Amoebite Jimmy Hey DJed a set which drew from film scores by Goblin, naturally, and some more unlikely picks, such as Scott Walker’s “The Electrician.” Of course this inspired me to write the following listicle for your enjoyment.

<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  >>  NEXT