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Music History Monday: May 12

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 12, 2014 10:18am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: May 12, 1928 - Legendary pop songwriter, producer, and arranger Burt Bacharach (born Burt Freeman Bacharach in Kansas City, MO). Happy 86th Birthday, Burt!
 


Born on this day: May 12, 1948 - Singer, songwriter, and musician Steve Winwood (born Stephen Lawrence Winwood in Handsworth, Birmingham, UK). Happy 66th Birthday, Steve!
 


On this day in music history: May 12, 1958 - "All I Have To Do Is Dream" by The Everly Brothers hits #1 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart for four weeks, topping the Rhythm & Blues Best Sellers chart for five weeks on May 19, 1958, and also topping the Country & Western Best Sellers chart for three weeks on June 2, 1958. Written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant, it is the second chart topping single for the rock & roll duo from Brownie, KY. Having also penned The Everly Brothers first number one single "Bye Bye Love," the husband and wife songwriting duo will write the ballad "All I Have To Do Is Dream" in only fifteen minutes. The Everlys will record the song at RCA Victor Studios in Nashville, TN on March 6, 1958, in just two takes. Legendary guitarist Chet Atkins will also play electric guitar on the track. Released as a single in April of 1958, it will quickly become a smash. Entering the Best Sellers chart at #9 on April 28, 1958, it will leap to the top of the chart two weeks later. When it tops the country singles chart on June 2, 1958, it will become the first record in Billboard chart history to top the pop, R&B, and country charts simultaneously. The single will also backed by the song "Claudette," written by a then relatively unknown musician named Roy Orbison, inspired by his wife. "Claudette" will also chart, peaking at #30 on the pop Best Sellers chart on the same date that "Dream" tops the chart. A rock & roll standard, "All I Have To Do Is Dream" will be covered numerous times over the years including versions by actor Richard Chamberlain (#14 Pop), Bobbie Gentry and Glen Campbell (#27 Pop, #6 Country), and Andy Gibb and Victoria Principal (#51 Pop). The Everly Brothers original version of "All I Have To Do Is Dream" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA and is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 2004.
 

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Music History Monday: May 5

Posted by Jeff Harris, May 5, 2014 10:02am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

Born on this day: May 5, 1934 - R&B vocal legend Johnnie Taylor (born Johnnie Harrison Taylor in Crawfordsville, AR). Happy Birthday to this rhythm and blues great on would have been his 80th Birthday.
 


On this day in music history: May 5, 1962West Side Story - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack hits #1 on the Billboard Top 200 for 54 weeks (non-consecutive). Produced by Didier Deutsch, it is recorded at the United Artists Scoring Stage in Hollywood on August 9 - 10, 1960. Featuring songs written by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim, it is the soundtrack for the film adaptation of the hit Broadway musical. The soundtrack album like the film itself will become an unprecedented success, with the album ascending to the top of the charts following the film's sweep of the Academy Awards, winning 10 of the 11 awards its nominated for. The West Side Story soundtrack will set a record for the longest run at #1 in the history of the Billboard pop album chart (unbroken to this day), spending a total of one year and two weeks at the top. The album will also spend a total of over five years on the Top 200 before falling off of the chart in 1967. It will win the Grammy Award for Best Sound Track Album or Recording of Original Cast From a Motion Picture or Television in 1962. West Side Story - Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: April 28

Posted by Jeff Harris, April 28, 2014 10:22am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: April 28, 1969Chicago Transit Authority, the debut album by the Chicago is released. Produced by James William Guercio, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City from January 27 - 30, 1969. Formed in 1967, the band are originally known as The Big Thing before changing their name to the Chicago Transit Authority in 1968. That same year, they will meet record producer James William Guericio who will also become their manager, helping them to secure a deal with Columbia Records. Relocating to Los Angeles, they will go through months of intensive rehearsals and writing sessions, before going to New York in early 1969 to record their first album. Recorded in just three days, they will have enough material for not only one, but two albums. CBS will initially balk at releasing a two record set on new band. Insistent on releasing the album as it was originally conceived, the band and Guericio will have to agree to take a cut in royalty payments as well as allow the label to price the album at a slightly lower rate than normal for a two LP set. Once released, the twelve track double album will initially get off to a slow start but will find success through heavy touring and support from FM underground radio. It will spin off four singles including "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?" (#7 Pop) and "Beginnings" (#7 Pop). Chicago Transit Authority will peak at number seventeen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: April 21

Posted by Jeff Harris, April 21, 2014 10:30am | Post a Comment


To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.


Born on this day: April 21, 1959 - Singer, songwriter and founder of The Cure, Robert Smith (born Robert James Smith in Blackpool, UK). Happy 55th Birthday, Robert!
 


On this day in music history: April 21, 1958 - "Twilight Time" by The Platters hits #1 on the Billboard Best Sellers chart for one week, also topping the R&B Best Sellers chart for three weeks on April 28, 1958. Written by Buck Ram, Al Nevins, Morton Nevins, and Artie Dunn, it is the third pop and fourth R&B chart-topper for the Los Angeles-based vocal group. The song is originally recorded in 1944 by The Three Suns and by big band leader Les Brown. When The Platters record it in early 1958, it will initially be the B-side of "Out Of My Mind." American Bandstand host Dick Clark prefers "Twilight" and begins heavily plugging it on the show, making it the A-side by default. Entering the Best Sellers chart at #7 on April 14, 1958, it will leap to the top of the chart the following week. The single will sell over 1.5 million copies by the time it tops the charts,  The success of the record will be significant as more than 90% of its sales on the 7" 45 RPM format, leading The Platters label Mercury Records to phase out the manufacturing of the 10" 78 RPM record, the format that had dominated the music industry for the first half century of its existence. "Twilight Time" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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Music History Monday: April 14

Posted by Jeff Harris, April 14, 2014 11:21am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: April 14, 1973 - "Masterpiece" by The Temptations hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for two weeks, also peaking at #7 on the Hot 100 on April 28, 1973. Written and produced by Norman Whitfield, it is the 11th R&B chart-topper for the veteran Motown vocal group. Songwriter and producer Norman Whitfield will give the song its title when he feels that all of the combined elements of the piece add up to a "masterpiece," though the word does not appear in the lyrics. Whitfield will write "Masterpiece" as a sequel to the Grammy-winning smash "Papa Was A Rolling Stone" (and the album All Directions), and features members of The Funk Brothers providing musical support and is arranged by Paul Riser. The single and album are recorded during a period where there is ever-mounting tension between the highly-strung producer and The Temptations, who are unhappy at having no say in the creative process and are being referred to by music critics as "the Norman Whitfield Choral Singers." "Masterpiece" will be edited down from its nearly 14 minute epic length down to under four and a half minutes for single release. Though the Tempts will top the R&B chart three more times with "Let Your Hair Down," "Happy People," and "Shakey Ground," in 1974 and 1975 respectively, "Masterpiece" will be will be the group's last top ten pop hit for 18 years. It returns to the upper reaches of the chart when they collaborate with Rod Stewart on "The Motown Song" peaking at #10 in September of 1991. "Masterpiece" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.
 

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