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Men In Black: Black Flag and N.W.A. - L.A.'s Musical Influence On The World Part 1

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, April 19, 2007 11:56am | Post a Comment
N.W.A. and Black Flag had much in common. Their music spoke of oppression, police brutality and the party life. The cops continuously harassed both groups. Riots sprung at both group's shows, making it hard for the groups to perform. On top of that, they were practically neighbors. Compton is just a few miles away from Lawndale.


BLACK FLAG

Black Flag played hardcore punk that woke suburbia from its sleep. When the rock clubs banned Black Flag from playing their venues, they created alternative venues for their shows and created the first D.I.Y. touring circuit for alternative rock bands. Black Flag released hundreds of records on their own label (SST Records) by other influential punk rock groups. They were the godfathers of the 90's grunge movement as well as every hardcore punk band that came after them. Black Flag saved punk rock from dying a premature hipster's death, yet unfortunately introduced the whole knucklehead element into the punk scene. Circle pit, anyone?


N.W.A.

No disrespect to Too Short or The Geto Boys, but there would be no gangster rap in mainstream media if it weren’t for N.W.A. They achieved massive commercial success and mainstream appeal without the help of radio airplay or MTV. They helped expose society to "ghetto life," putting South L.A. and Compton on the map. Lyrically they helped inspire the revolt of 1992 (Some of you called it a riot; some of us call it a revolt!) and amputated the east coast stronghold held on hip-hop for many years, focusing attention not only on the L.A. rap scene but on other federations of rap music such as Houston, Atlanta and the Bay Area.

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Black Flag (27), N.w.a. (3)