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Music History Monday: November 24

Posted by Jeff Harris, November 24, 2014 10:40am | Post a Comment

To read more Behind The Grooves, go to http://behindthegrooves.tumblr.com.

On this day in music history: November 24, 1966 - The Beatles will begin recording "Strawberry Fields Forever" at Abbey Road Studios in London. After a three month vacation, the band will return to the studio to begin work on the follow up to "Revolver." The first song recorded is a new composition of John Lennon's titled "Strawberry Fields Forever." Lennon will write the song in Almeria, Spain while filming How I Won The War with director Richard Lester in the early Fall of 1966. One take of the song will be recorded that evening, though it'll change dramatically and grow more complex over the month that it takes to complete the track. The song will mark the beginning of a new era in the band's creativity that will change the face of popular music yet again. The song is named for a Salvation Army orphanage around the corner from Lennon's childhood home in Liverpool where he would attend garden parties in the summer. Once in the studio, the song will evolve from a gentle, sparsely arranged ballad to a heavily scored piece with horns and strings complimenting the basic track. The finished version of the song will consist of two separate versions. Lennon will like the first half of the first remake and the second half of another. He will suggest to producer George Martin that the two be edited together, which at first seems to not be possible since they are recorded in different keys and tempos. Martin will discover that by increasing the speed of one and slowing down the other recording, that they will match. Originally intended to be part of the band's next album (Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band), "Strawberry Fields Forever" will instead be issued as one half of a double A-sided single in February 1967 (w/ "Penny Lane"). It will peak at #2 on the UK singles chart and #8 on the Billboard Hot 100.
 

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One album wonders: World of Twist's Quality Street

Posted by Eric Brightwell, November 24, 2014 08:00am | Post a Comment
WORLD OF TWIST - QUALITY STREET (1991)
World of Twist Quality Street

World of Twist
are one of the greatest one album wonders, on par with The La’s and The Sex Pistols — if unfortunately much more obscure than either. Although they’ve been broken up for more than twenty years, their cult still remains small although it seems inevitable that they will some day be granted the adoration which they so deserve. It seems only a matter of time before an excellent documentary on them screens at Don’t Knock the Rock or appears on video. 

World of Twist



As with many one album wonders, though not prolific as recording artists, the World of Twist’s members were involved in music for many years. From 1977-1979, Dave Conner (vocals), Gordon King (bass), James Fry (guitar), Julia Adamson (guitar), and Tony Ogden (drums) played in a punk band called The Blackout when all were art students in Art & Design at Stockport College in Greater Manchester.

Essential Records: The Tony Williams Lifetime, "Emergency!"

Posted by Rick Frystak, November 23, 2014 02:57pm | Post a Comment

They say music can be life-changing. I’ll buy that. Probably the most important and profound post-Beatles record in my Jazz life, or even my musical, personal and business life (you’ll see), was Emergency! by the The Tony Willams Lifetime. That’s a big sentence for an LP fiend like me. ONE record led by a drummer did all that? To me, Jazz is a huge, beautiful expression of the American Classical music, no small accomplishment in the last 100 years with everything out there. And I remember as if was yesterday how this record came to change my life.

In high school and later I was in a bluesy, Procol Harum-meets-Jefferson Airplane-style outfit called Moonfleet, after the film. We had the town and the era by the ear, so naturally we were asked to play our own Senior Picnic close to graduation at Westchester High School (still there), near the beach in L.A. I had played drums at another Senior picnic and I knew the picnics were free-for–all's in those days. We were excited to blow our fellow student’s minds, with coffins and dancers and fiery  entertainment, with myself on guitar then.

As per our gig deal, the school had hired a PA system for our show. The day came and we pulled in for a sound check with our equipment. What the hell? It’s a flat bed truck set up on the Jr. Varsity lawn!! With nice club-PA speakers! Loud!! With audio guys that knew what they were doing!! We had a big stage with good sound. But, hey, that music, coming over the system?

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Hip-Hop Rap-Up: M.O.P., Shadow & Cut Chemist, Too $hort, Live Human, Diamond District, REKS X Hazardis Soundz + more

Posted by Billyjam, November 22, 2014 12:08pm | Post a Comment
Among the new/recent releases to arrive at Amoeba is M.O.P.'s Street Certified which earlier this week was released by Nature Sounds as a digital download. The new nine track EP from the two-decade strong influential Brooklyn rap duo, whose name stands for Mash out Posse, features such tracks as "187," "Broad Daylight (featuring Busta Rhymes),"  and the Street Certified title track that features Queens hip-hop duo Mobb Deep. The EP is executive produced by DJ Premier and is just one of two new releases from the duo. The other will be a special box set retrospective entitled 20 Years And Still Gunnin: The Ammo Box.

If you are in the Bay Area and missed DJ Shadow and Cut Chemist's recent all vinyl Afrika Bambaataa record collection themed Renegades of Rhythm tour when it stopped at the Mezzanine two months ago (I checked it out and it was off the hook!) you will have another chance to catch to two noted Cali DJs/producers/vinyl collectors when they do another Bay Area show (this time in the East Bay) when their openers will be Dam-Funk and Davey D at the Fox Theatre in Oakland on Tuesday November 25th at 8pm. Tickets here.

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Before Reggae

Posted by V.B., November 21, 2014 06:00pm | Post a Comment

Head to the Vinyl Beat website to check out extensive LP label guides and wild cover galleries!

Before Reggae, Rock Steady, and Ska, Calypso was the folk music of the English speaking Caribbean. Like all good folk music, calypsos told stories in song and were often written to celebrate topical events. The music originated with slaves on the plantations. By the golden era of the late 1920s and '30s, there were many diverse influences including music heard from U.S. radio waves that reached the islands.

Here’s what Wikipedia says: Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music that originated in Trinidad and Tobago during the early to mid-20th century. Its rhythms can be traced back to West African Kaiso and the arrival of French planters and their slaves from the French Antilles in the 1600s.

Some of the earliest recordings were by Atilla the Hun, and The Roaring Lion, in the early 1930s.

Atilla – “Roosevelt in Trinidad”

Roaring Lion – “Ugly Woman”


 

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