Electronic-Dance

Rivington Não Rio (CD)

After leaving the Prefuse 73 moniker lying dormant for several years producer Guillermo Scott Herren has returned. "I've come back to hyper focusing, immersing myself in the sounds, rhythms, and formations that created Prefuse 73 in the first place," he says. "… Right now I'm at my most confident and comfortable since 05/06." Rivington Não Rio is the only full-length release in his trio of recently announced Temporary Residence recordings. Sandwiched between Forsyth Garden and Every Color of DarknessRio is the key to unlocking this “epic triptych.” The album does not attempt to push too far outside of the spacey and low key, keeping it fairly even keeled and balanced. The entire album moves with a casual head nod pace, layered just enough to lose focus on the present. Tracks like “Applauded Assumptions” and “Inside” instrumentally meander and warp through beats and glitch experimentation. When Herren adds vocal talents, such as Pinback’s Rob Crow on “Quiet One” or Sam Dew on “Infrared,” his beats and glitches seem to merge and weave in between the words. Whereas in "140 Jabs Interlude” Herren has alt rappers’ Milo and Busdriver take the front seat and drive the beat. Heren may be returning to the sound that made up Prefuse 73 in the first place, but Rivington Não Rio has much more to offer than just a return to greatness.

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Damogen Furies (CD)

In 2015 the overload of the senses is rather hard to impress upon humans. As information flows freely at a breakneck pace, anesthetized youths engage in a barrage of cultural and emotional assaults on the daily. There seems to be an infinite capacity to the modern humans’ sensory intake. Enter Tom Jekinson AKA Squarepusher. IDM’s antidote to the sonically apathetic. In Damogen Furies Squarepusher has concocted a Free-Jazz inspired unity with the current sound of EDM. The unifying qualities however tend to sound more like an affable acknowledgement of the times backed with an uppercut of unpredictable drill and bass. This unpredictability is due to the spontaneous recording techniques at Jekinson’s disposal. A setup that he created on the road to imitate his home studio, which allows him to record and mix everything in one take. Once that fact comes into view the epic club banger vibe of the opener “Stor Eiglass” or the proficient build of the '80s synth-scape “Exjag Nives” all the more impressive. The bombastic spontaneity of Damogen Furies is equally as innovative as Squarepusher has known to be in the past, with a brutality that matches the current landscape. Brace yourself.

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III (CD)

This trio is changing the rules on improvised instrumental music and taking jazz into the future. III is their biggest project yet, ushering in the group’s newest explorations that are proving to be limitless.

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Human Voice (CD)

Dntel, solo producer by the name of Jimmy Tamborello has long been creating soundscapes for others to put their human voice over. With Human Voice Tamborello has refused listeners the rights to their own language. Instead, he has created a world where connection is fleeting, melody is deconstructed, and all “voices” mechanized. An interesting proposition when the bulk of your listeners associate your music with Death Cab For Cutie’s emotive crooner Ben Gibbard. Nevertheless, the gambit pays off. Amidst the bits and grids of Human Voice, the mechanized voices morph through layered synths and staccato beats from the unintelligible to a distinct melodic pattern and back again. After 8 tracks It gives the listener the feeling of having communicated with a being not unlike a robot Ben Gibbard.

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Down To Earth (CD)

With the help of some ace vocalists, Aussie producer duo Flight Facilities have a seductively cool debut album on their hands. Singer/songwriter Emma Louise sells the soft and sensual “Two Bodies.” “Comedy Bang Bang’s” Reggie Watts proves a soulful crooner on the groovy “Sunshine.” The whistling, beat-driven “Stand Still” leaves you doing anything but, while singer/producer Stee Downes helps the duo remake adult contemporary synth-funk on “Hold Me Down.” The non-vocal tracks are just as sweet, with found recordings serving to add a dose of drama to the duo’s silky synth sounds. Flight Facilities could go further to distinguish themselves, but what they do, they do very well. And songs like “Crave You” have a lot of personality—pop singer Giselle pines away, “Why can’t you want me like the other boys do? They stare at me, while I stare at you,” over the duo’s jazz-inspired production. Consistently engaging and immaculately made, it’s a project that ultimately soars.

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