Electronic-Dance

Museum Of Love (CD)

Ye, what else hath risen from the fallen ashes of the LCD? Former LCD Soundsystem drummer Pat Mahoney and Dennis “Jee Day” McNany of The Juan Mclean release their eponymous debut, Museum Of Love. The duo made themselves known last year when they released the darkly groove ridden “Down South” back in 2013 along with the repetitiously soulful “Monotronic.” The album is indeed a continuation of the beats set in motion with their pre-released singles. At the forefront and most apparent are the distinct vocals of now frontman Pat Mahoney. Having named the outfit after a Daniel Johnston song the vocals are surprisingly soulful. Uniquely placed between a sort of David Byrne / Bryan Ferry croon, the vocals are draped over Jee Day’s complex disco beats. The velvety vocals are employed remarkably well, comforting the listener as they groove through the eerie steely “Learned Helplessness in Rats (Disco Drummer).” The experience culminates in the closing track, “All The Winners (Fuck You Buddy),” which actually sounds like a closing credits tune complete with obligatory orchestral strings. The shadow of the inherent nepotism of DFA’s flagship group completely cast aside, let us welcome freshly Museum of Love in all its soul shaking glory. Thanks be.

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Our Love (CD)

Dan Snaith’s latest album moves his varying aliases closer together, utilizing some of the dancier aspects of his work as Daphni without sacrificing his core indie-electro-pop appeal as Caribou. The albums starts on a brilliant note with “Can’t Do Without You,” a sumptuous love song that circulates some of the psychedelic swirl of previous Caribou releases even as it taps into EDM culture’s builds and breaks. “Silver” is a sweet, dazzling digital tapestry of sound that tips its hat to ’80s synth pop while retaining its now cache. Snaith touches on many eras of dance music throughout Our Love, on the freestyle-vibing “All I Ever Need” and the luxuriously banging title track, which ends in a nod to Chicago house classic “Good Life.” Yet Snaith’s work is still his own, as tracks like “Dive” feature wavering keyboards and breathy vocals that make you feel like you’re teetering. Some of the later tracks fail to distinguish themselves, but none sounds remotely bad. Our Love is a warm, inviting listen from start to finish. It’s yet another bit of perfection from Snaith.

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In A Dream (CD)

Post hardcore guitarist turned electronic musician John Maclean teams up with post LCD Soundsystem vocalist Nancy Whang to release In A Dream. The record has an immediate dancability indicative of any DFA release. However, the pedigree between these two lends a familiarity that gives the record a certain timelessness. During the last days of LCD System Nancy Whang was asserting herself as a creative force in that group. With the dissolving of LCD Soundsystem, Nancy has turned it way up as the prominent vocal feature on Maclean’s record. Maclean churns out some killer pop-disco synth bangers, while Whang keeps the hooks coming. The single “A Simple Design” highlights the partnership that Whang and Maclean have, and leaves hope for a new definitive duo for the DFA label.

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Mean Love (CD)

Brooklyn based Ahmed Gallab’s third full-length album, Mean Love, is soul-funk genre bending pop record. With the tracks are loosely based on the meditation of love gone wrong, Sinkane uses all manner of instruments and genres to weave this piece together. The result being his most experimental and pointed release yet. The multi-instrumentalist’s vocals wash over thick bass lines in the '80s soul inspired single “Hold Tight.” “Galley Boys,” is done with an almost country island pedal steel vibe. One highlight is with the track “Omdurman.” The album's brightly hymn-like closer has the communal reminiscence of the work that Gallab did as the musical director of William Onyeabor tribute The Atomic Bomb! Band.

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Innerworld (CD)

Electric Youth broke out in a big way with “A Real Hero,” a song that came to define the sound of the film Drive and its corresponding soundtrack. The duo double down on that impossibly romantic synth sound on Innerworld, their long-awaited debut album. That slow-burning pulse is back in songs like “Innocence,” perfectly capturing the romantic ideal of first love with synthesizers that at first sparkle like eyes being rubbed awake and then dazzle with gentle orchestration. Subtly enough referencing the soundtrackers of ’80s proms like Yaz and Alphaville, Bronwynn Griffin’s breathy voice sometimes floats by as a dream and other times catches onto a lighter-waving sentiment, like “we are the youth, we like to sing” (on “WeAreTheYouth”). Though Electric Youth may lack a bit for originality, Innerworld pretty skillfully avoids sameyness by appealing to current Europop-indebted dance music on tracks like “Runaway,” though they’re at their comfortable best on songs like “Without You,” building from their favored digital throb into a lovable freestyle couple. Griffin and her partner, Austin Garrick, have been a couple since the 8th grade, and thus their ability to make every synth stab feel like a dizzying first crush rings authentic. It doesn’t matter if you’ve heard some of the sounds here before, or that they even include the three-year-old “Real Hero”; Innerworld’s swoony romanticism makes you feel like it’s the first time.

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Syro (CD)

In a rare double-blessing, the last two years have given us not only a new album by My Bloody Valentine but another artist iconic of the ’90s, Aphex Twin. Syro plays as a collection of just about everything Richard Davis James does best, fusing jungle beats to gorgeous ambient tapestries on stunning opener “Minipops 67 [120.2][Source Field Mix],” taking us through dense synth explorations on tracks like the 10-minute “Xmas_Evet10 [120][Thanaton3 Mix]” and vibing off hip-hop and synth funk on “Produk 29 [101].” Vocals appear now and then (from James and his family), offering skewed, incomprehensible chatter that adds to the liveliness of “Produk 29 [101]” and giving “Minipops 67 [120.2][Source Field Mix]” its grabbing human element, pulling you into the rest of the album. Though he used some 138 pieces of equipment and shifted his set up every few minutes while recording Syro, that seems to have had an energizing effect on James, and the result is a sharp, if varied piece of work that hangs together beautifully, flowing from scenic but heady pieces like “4 Bit 9d Api+E+6 [126.26]” to hard-hitting bass tracks such as “180db_ [130].” There aren’t many shocking moments on Syro like, say, “Come to Daddy’s” shrieking wail, nor does it push listeners to their extreme limit like the challenging Drukqs did, but accessibility doesn’t mar Syro. Rather, even despite their straight-off-the-hard-drive titles, tracks like “Papat4 [155][Pineal Mix]” are really breathtaking pieces of music, designed for immersion rather than to filter listeners out. Just like m b v, we had no right to expect Syro would be this good, much less that it would be released at all, which makes it all the better. Simply put, it’s one of the most instantly enjoyable collections of music James has ever released.

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Human Voice (CD)

Dntel, solo producer by the name of Jimmy Tamborello has long been creating soundscapes for others to put their human voice over. With Human Voice Tamborello has refused listeners the rights to their own language. Instead, he has created a world where connection is fleeting, melody is deconstructed, and all “voices” mechanized. An interesting proposition when the bulk of your listeners associate your music with Death Cab For Cutie’s emotive crooner Ben Gibbard. Nevertheless, the gambit pays off. Amidst the bits and grids of Human Voice, the mechanized voices morph through layered synths and staccato beats from the unintelligible to a distinct melodic pattern and back again. After 8 tracks It gives the listener the feeling of having communicated with a being not unlike a robot Ben Gibbard.

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Ishi (CD)

Future new age/ambient classic from the LA modular explorer; known for his expansive collaborations with Akron/Family, Sun Araw, and The Congos. Ishi receives its name from the last "wild native American"... Ged succeeds in bringing natural instincts to technology; remember to forget.

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Noise Vs. Beauty (CD)

Album ten from prolific and eclectic electronic music producer spans, as you might expect, dubstep, trap, IDM, bubblegum glitch, sampledelic hip hop, anthemic festival fistpumping EDM, etc. Each Bassnectar album gets a little more shiny and a little more diverse as Lorin Ashton spends more time refining his day-glo showmanship on the road, absorbing more textures and hearing new sounds to be incorporated into his neon gumbo. On the topic of this latest album he says it's "a 15 song journey which spans the spectrum of music from hardcore noise hysteria to lush, ethereal beauty - and many points in between. I collaborated with over 50 different human beings on this collection, and it is without a doubt my favorite album to date!"

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