Nov 2020

Jewel Box: And This Is Me (LP)

Jewel Box: And This Is Me celebrates the songs mentioned by name by Elton John in his acclaimed memoir Me, closing with the Elton and Bernie Taupin’s 2020 Academy Award winning "(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again" featuring Taron Egerton.

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Gimme Some Truth. (CD)

Gimme Some Truth is the definitive new best of John Lennon collection featuring his most vital and best loved solo recordings completely remixed from the original master tapes.

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Migration Stories (CD)

M. Ward’s Migration Stories is a narcotic and nocturnal exercise in songwriting, with a sound as gauzy as its album cover. Largely acoustic driven, Migration Stories features what seem to be rather straightforward folk songs cloaked in all manner of sonic treatments, creating a tremendous moodiness and blurring the lines between sentiments happy and sad. At times M. Ward’s voice barely cracks above the fray, sounding weary and weathered and occasionally consumed by the ghostly atmospherics. Thus explains songs like “Heaven’s Nail and Hammer”, which takes a Louie Armstrong melody to Lynchian surf guitars, managing to sound both ominous and uplifting. “Unreal City” resembles a classic Springsteen song turned inside out, coming on as a ‘50s rock ‘n roll stomper before gradually deconstructing itself into a synth-assisted anti-chorus; an unwinding from the thrill of its sing-a-long introduction.

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Serpentine Prison (CD)

On Serpentine Prison,the first solo album from The National's frontman, Matt Berninger paints subtle, intricate portraits of the ups and downs of life. In this quiet setting, his deep voice occasionally calls to mind Leonard Cohen, for example on the spare ballad "One More Second." These are elegant ruminations that offer fans of The National a new perspective on Berninger.

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Visions Of Bodies Being Burned (CD)

Clipping. returns with Visions Of Bodies Being Burned, a smart, abrasive descent into musical dystopia. Rapper Daveed Diggs is at his most relentless here, channeling horror movie imagery into the real life horrors of the present day while the rest of the crew provides a heady blend of punk rock, trap, and industrial. Equally head-banging and disconcerting, Clipping. proves once more to be at the top of their game. At first listen, Visions is a brutal fever dream, but listen deeper and you’ll see that Diggs is firmly in control of the darkness at all times.

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Fleet Foxes (LP)

Fleet Foxes’ 2008 self-titled debut full-length really is a gem. We’ve all been up to our ears in folk-tinged indie rock for some time now, so it’s easy to forget just how vibrant, gorgeous, and immersing the Fleet Foxes’ sound was back then…and still is today. How can an album so intricately-crafted sound so cozy and warm? The band’s conducting a symphony of Americana mood and folk harmonies with rich chamber pop melodies over the course of the album’s far-too-short run time. (It clocks in at just over 39 minutes but somehow songs this tantalizing just leave you wanting more.) As the album winds its way along, it’s easy to lose track of time, let the outside world slip away, and dive deep into another, more fervent world—one of Fleet Foxes’ own making.

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Hey Clockface (CD)

Few artists possess the chameleon-like ability to evolve and innovate that Elvis Costello has demonstrated over the course of his storied career. His latest, Hey Clockface, puts those qualities on fine display. Costello jumps genres effortlessly, from the swinging jazz of the title track to the poetic, moody “Newspaper Pane.” A lively, invigorating album that sounds lush and vivid, both timely and timeless. Elvis fans, rejoice! You’ve got a hit on your hands.

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How The River Ganges Flows: Sublime Masterpieces Of Indian Violin (1933-1952) (CD)

Hats off to the good folks at Third Man Records for bringing How The River Ganges Flows: Sublime Masterpieces Of Indian Violin (1933 – 1952) to modern, musicology-obsessed audiences. Remastered from long unheard South Indian violin ‘78s, the collection is atmospheric and affecting, the melodies flowing from joy to despair. The recordings crackle with that old time electricity, the violin sounds as rich and soaring and immediate as it must have 70+ years ago. A thoroughly lovely listen that will surprise and delight those looking for a stirring, spellbinding voyage into the past.

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Lament (CD)

Touché Amoré's Lament just might be their most vital, compelling album yet. The hardcore heroes teamed up with legendary metal producer Ross Robinson, who has worked with everyone from Glassjaw to Korn, to create an ambitious, moving, and high-octane blaster of an album. All the intensity and thrash fans know and love are there, but there’s also a newfound melodicism, drawing on shoegaze and post-punk influences. The lyrics are smart impactful, and bittersweet and when paired with the urgency and intensity of the Lament’s guitar and drums, you’ve got a career-defining album on your hands.

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Closer To The Sun (LP)

Slightly Stoopid’s now classic 2005 album Closer to the Sun sounds as fresh and innovative today as it did back then. Fusing reggae, punk, dub, and acoustic rock, Slightly Stoopid smashes through genres…but in like, the chillest possible way. Tripped out and hypnotic, the songs weave their way along an eclectic route that’s sure to entrance longtime fans and first-time listeners looking for a grooved out, blissed out listening experience. It’s all good vibes on Closer to the Sun.

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