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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with DJ/Producer Jamie Jones

Posted by Amoebite, April 16, 2019 02:09pm | Post a Comment

Jaime Jones - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Welsh DJ, producer, and Hot Creations label co-founder Jamie Jones did some shopping at Amoeba Hollywood recently for our latest What's In My Bag? episode. One of his current favorites is Negro Swan, the latest album by Blood Orange. Not only is he a huge Blood Orange fan in general, but Jones was especially fond of Georgia Anne Muldrow's guest appearance on the album. "I've heard a few of her songs before and I love what she does," he proclaimed. "I was going to buy this today and there was a vinyl copy which is even better."

Jamie Jones is known for his unique brand of warmer, more melody-driven techno. Named Resident Advisor's Top DJ of 2011, Jones first became a force in the scene through his mid-'00s DJs Can Dance warehouse parties in East London and summer gigs on Ibiza, including the Circoloco day parties at DC10. Inspired by Larry Levan’s Paradise Garage, Jones launched the now legendary Paradise series of parties. Born in Ibiza, Paradise regularly travels the globe. taking place in cities like NYC, Miami, LA, Toronto, and Moscow. 

Hot Creations labelAs a member of the British-American electronic group Hot Natured, Jones found mainstream recognition in the UK, after the group's single "Benediction" landed at #31 on the singles chart. A frequent honorary at the DJ Awards, Jones has been nominated multiple times for Best Tech House DJ, Breakthrough DJ, and Best International DJ. He has been awarded the crown of Best Deep House DJ several times. In addition to his performance career, Jones also heads the prolific Hot Creations label and its subsidiary labels, Emerald City and Hottrax.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Xenia Rubinos

Posted by Amoebite, March 1, 2017 12:03pm | Post a Comment

Xenia Rubinos What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

Xenia Rubinos, the Brooklyn-based songwriter/performer, went shopping at Amoeba Hollywood recently and let us in on some of the records that inspired her latest album, Black Terry Cat. "The first track off my record...was totally inspired by this song, 'Love To Love You.'" She is, of course, speaking of Donna Summer's disco classic, which was produced by the legendary Giorgio Moroder. "I just like how unhinged she is, and unapologetically sexy and powerful and ethereal," Rubinos says of Summer. Another artist who inspired her was the prolific jazz pianist and composer Mary Lou Williams. Speaking about Williams' solo piano recital at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Rubinos said, "Mary Lou really inspired me a lot...and she's, kind of, not as well known as she should be."

Xenia Rubinos Black Terry CatXenia Rubinos draws inspiration from social issues, civil rights struggles, and her Afro-Latina heritage. After graduating from Berklee College of Music with a degree in jazz composition, Rubinos began her career by performing DIY shows in her apartment. Her debut album, Magic Trix, was released via Ba Da Bing! in 2013.

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The Art Of The LP Cover- Bandits, Outlaws & Gangsters

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, February 5, 2012 11:45pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba Hollywood Cuban & Salsa Best Sellers

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, December 29, 2008 02:25am | Post a Comment
1.The Buena Vista Social Club -Live At Carnegie Hall
2. Omara Portuondo-Gracia
3. Candido Y Su Movimiento - Palos De Fuego
4. Willie Colon- El Malo Vol. II: Prisioneros Del Mambo
5. Jose Lugo-Guasabara
6.Tabaco Y Su Metales-Grandes Exitos
7. Pachapo-El Super Tumbao
8. Tony Rojas-Introducing Tony Rojas
9. The Buena Vista Social Club-S/T
10. Bebo Valdes/Javier Colina - Live At The Village Vanguard

Once again The Buena Vista Social Club franchise ruled the Christmas charts, coming in at number one, two and nine. Live At Carnegie Hall is the full concert that you see towards the end of the Buena Vista Social Club movie. Omara Portuondo's latest came with much hype from NPR, which fueled her sales.  The Buena Vista Social Club is usually a safe bet at Christmas time.The movie was a great and all the stories behind the musicians involved are quite triumphant. However, if you want something a little more modern, there are releases from Willie Colon and pianist Jose Lugo (not to be confused with the Seattle Mairiner pitcher with the same name), which round off the top five. Colon’s El Malo Vol. II: Prisioneros Del Mambo is Willie’s first album in eleven years and Jose Lugo's effort has many special guests from Bobby Valentin to Gilberto Santa Rosa. Fans of modern day Hard Salsa should love this.

Candido Y Su Movimiento, Tabaco Y Su Metales, Pachapo and Tony Rojas' releases are all re-issues of their classic titles that were long out of print. It's nice to see many classic Salsa releases besides the Fania reissues coming back in print.

The ninety-year old Bebo Valdes continues to make great recordings. This time he pairs himself with Javier Colina, a bassist from Spain. Once again Bebo finds himself nominated for a Grammy for this release. One could say it’s an act of tokenism and perhaps it is, but I really believe Bebo has gotten better with age. He is the one “celebrity” that has come to Amoeba that I can say I'm truly in awe of.

Lo Mato @ Amoebapalooza 2007 - Punk Rock Salsa?

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, August 15, 2007 02:53pm | Post a Comment

I never suspected Matt Polley to be a Hector Lavoe fan. He’s a kid from Indiana and well…he looks the part. So when he asked me to perform with him at this year’s Amoebapalooza covering Hector Lavoe and Willie Colon songs, I was a bit surprised. Amoebapalooza is fun as far as seeing your co-workers live out their rock and roll fantasies, but it’s usually just that -- rock band after rock band with a smattering of folk, experimental music and Electronica. Salsa at Amoebapalooza? I’ve always been a punk at heart, so playing Salsa at Amoebapalooza would be more punk rock than actually playing punk rock.

Matt and I talked about it for weeks before Amoebapalooza. We signed up as "Lo Mato" and then went combing the store for people who would want to perform with us. We found two people. Cashier Ricky Ray Rivera was down, as was Erick, who works in the Reggae and Hip-Hop section. Erick and Ray were to play percussion as well as sing the chorus...so that meant me on bass, Ray and Erick on percussion and Matt Polley as Hector Lavoe.

Paul Vasquez, who works in the World Music section, wanted to get in on the action. He told Polley he had a trombone and although he hadn’t played in a while he would start practicing. He had not picked up a trombone since elementary school. For Paul to pull off the Willie Colon parts would be nothing short of a miracle! Most professional trombone players would find the task difficult. So it meant a rusty trombone player as Willie Colon.

Weeks went by and we hadn’t practiced once. Amoebapalooza was a week away and Matt was in a slight panic. He had found a piano player and a drummer and by then Paul had backed out, so we had no horns. I called my friend Pat Hoed to take over for me on bass. He is a huge Willie Colon/Hector Lavoe fan so he knew all the songs already. I switched to the keyboards and got my friend Jeremy Keller on guitar to help me play the horn lines. We learned the horn lines an hour before our first and only rehearsal.

Our rehearsal was rough. Only Pat and the piano player knew the songs. I only knew the parts on the bass but not the horn lines. When Matt sang for the first time a little voice came out of the P.A. system, not Hector Lavoe-like at all. Our music lumbered along with no swing and a tiny voice coming out of the P.A.We all started laughing and shaking our heads after the first song. Maybe we should have practiced more. However, the drummer didn’t show up, so most of our problems were not having someone holding down the beat. By the end of practice we had gone through the two songs at least twice and it didn’t sound half bad.

For the actual Amoebapalooza, Matt dyed his hair black with a spray can and put on the trademark Lavoe sunglasses. He even had some of the Lavoe moves down. Some of his co-workers didn’t know that it was him singing! The drummer showed up and we had some backbeat to guide us through. We played “Dia De Me Suerte” and “Eso Se Baile Asi!” I actually liked it more than I thought I would. I was really surprised to see some of the Amoebites dancing. It sounded like what we were -- Non-Salseros playing Salsa, Punk Rock Salsa. The next day Matt was the buzz around Amoeba, everyone talking about how well he did. People asked me if Matt was fluent in Spanish. Other than those songs he doesn’t know very much, so he did well to fool some people. Some staff that went to the show asked about Willie Colon/Hector Lavoe’s music, which made me happy. I’m always glad to share everything I know about their music. To me, Lavoe and Colon were one of the great songwriting team of all time and it was a honor to play homage to them.

Here are more pictures, taken by Joanna Hernandez & myself.





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