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Weird Wednesday at The Alamo Drafthouse New Mission in September

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, September 1, 2019 03:42pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba and Alamo Drafthouse are at it again this September as we continue our partnership for Weird Wednesday at the New Mission theater in SF! Weird Wednesday is Alamo's weekly celebration of movies that are too outrageous, too beastly, too gritty, and sometimes too synthy for prime time. Here's what we have in store for you this month...

SLEEPWALKERS (1992)
Wednesday, September 4. 10:15pm
Mary and her son Charles are shapeshifting, telekinetic beasts who eat the souls of virgins and battle really cute house cats. Oh, and they’re also lovers. Filled with gory carnage, jaw-dropping special effects, and a constant barrage of insanity, Sleepwalkers is the ultimate WTF party in Stephen King’s filmography. Look for uncredited cameos from Mark Hamill, Joe Dante, Tobe Hooper, and Clive Barker. Plus a scene with John Landis eating a sandwich while performing an autopsy.



AN EVENING OF SYNTH ROCK W/ GENESIS AND EMERSON, LAKE, AND PALMER (1977)
Wednesday, September 11. 10:40pm
A 35mm double bill played L*O*U*D, communing us with the colorful godz of classic progressive rock. Come take a topographic journey into 21st Century Schizoid land with us. Everything that makes prog wonderful (and everything scoffed at by critics of the day) is on display in Genesis: In Concert (‘77) and ELP: Pictures At An Exhibition (‘73): synths, organs, dual drummers, Rickenbacker basses, guitar prodigies, elaborate stage shows, astounding sounds, lyrics from another planet and melodies from the eighth dimension.

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10 Limited Edition Soundtracks Out on Record Store Day 2017

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 11, 2017 07:05pm | Post a Comment

10 Limited Edition Record Store Day Soundtracks

Record Store Day is so close, you can almost taste all the limited edition special releases! On Saturday, April 22, 2017, indie music stores everywhere will join forces and unleash this year’s rare and drool-worthy RSD releases. (Download a PDF of those exclusive releases HERE.) It’s our Xmas and we are going to town, no Santa needed!

The vinyl soundtrack selection is especially plentiful and exciting this year, full of scores and collections that are being released for the first time ever, first time on vinyl, or are re-releases of out-of-print albums. Film fans will flip for the fabulous colored vinyl, deluxe additions and packaging, and - in a couple of cases - beautiful picture discs.

Here's my 10 favorite from those being offered:

Ciao! Manhattan soundtrackCiao! Manhattan

Part of Andy Warhol's Factory in the mid-'60s, Edie Sedgwick was “It Girl” of the Pop Art age. 1973's Ciao! Manhattan was the model and actor's final film. Written and directed by John Palmer and David Weisman, the movie tells a somewhat fictionalized account of Sedgewick's life. She portrays Susan Superstar, a New Yorker who ends up living in a drained swimming pool in Santa Barbara, always in a narcotic daze. The film was shot over a five-year period, at the end of which Sedgwick died of a barbiturate overdose at the age of 28.

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The Witch: A New England Folktale and Why You Need to Own It on DVD or Blu-ray

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 20, 2016 04:49pm | Post a Comment

The Witch

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


Did you ever try to hex your Algebra II teacher in high school the night before the final? Have you The Witchwatched the "Salem Witches" episode of In Search Of while sipping red wine from a black Madonna Inn goblet? Is your email password Pyewacket13? If your answer is yes to any of these and you have not yet seen The Witch: A New England Folktale (out now on DVD & Blu-ray), see it. If your answer is no but supernatural historical period horror films are your “jam,” see it.

Normally, I’m more into old school witch flicks, like City of the Dead (1960), Night of the Eagle (1962), and The Witches (1966), but The Witch is well done…just like my King Henry VIII steak at the House of Prime Rib. By the beard of Black Phillip the billy goat, when you watch this you will soon find yourself in an eerie trance in front of your boob-tube, being pulled into the dark and mysterious New England woods in the 17th century. If M. Night Shyamalan’s The Village (2004) and Avery Crounse's Eyes of Fire (1983) had a new little baby sister, it would be The Witch. (Eyes of Fire, if you can find on VHS somewhere, is totally spooksville too! View the trailer HERE.)

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Sundance NEXT FEST at Ace Hotel in Downtown L.A. Aug. 7-10 Features Film Screenings, Father John Misty, Warpaint and More

Posted by Billy Gil, August 1, 2014 03:05pm | Post a Comment
The Theatre at Ace Hotel in Downtown L.A.

A new film festival called Sundance NEXT FEST celebrates the intersection of music and film at the brand new Ace Hotel in Downtown Los Angeles from Aug. 7-10. Tickets can be picked up here.

The whole thing kicks off Aug. 7 with Cinespia screening Napoleon Dynamite at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery, starting at 8:30 p.m. Pick up tickets here.

napoleon dynamite

 

 

Check out a trailer for Napoleon Dymanite below to refresh your memory about how great this movie is:

 

On Aug. 8 at The Theatre at Ace will be a screening of the horror-comedy Life After Beth, starring Aubrey Plaza, followed by a performance by Father John Misty. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased here.

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Werner Herzog's Cave of Forgotten Dreams

Posted by Miss Ess, May 10, 2011 02:45pm | Post a Comment


 

By now, wherever you are in your life, you probably already know whether or not you enjoy the films of Werner Herzog. The famed German director is quite the polorizing auteur; he is anything but subtle, and in my opinion, he is also quite possibly out of his mind. But in a good way.

His latest, The Cave of Forgotten Dreams, is a 3-D documentary exploring the Chauvet Cave in France and its incredible prehistoric paintings. No matter what your typical stance on Herzog films happens to be, this film is worth watching just to get inside this cave, a place only a handful of scientists are allowed to visit about once a year under strict rules. Herzog, fearless as ever, brings a crew of 4 deep inside the cavern to capture paintings that have decorated this dark place for over 30,000 years and were only re-discovered in 1994. Like many Herzog films, this one is also steeped in the meaning he lays on thick with his stark, accented narration.

Herzog draws his typical lofty conclusions, this time about the interconnectedness of the human race and the meaning of art itself. On the lighter side of things, throughout the documentary there are several humorous moments with the wonderfully idiosyncratic cast of characters that make up the scientific team. Even if you ignore the steady drone of narration, the images in the cave, preserved through tens of thousands of years against all odds, remain fascinating, haunting, and illuminating.

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