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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Valerie June

Posted by Amoebite, September 10, 2018 06:36pm | Post a Comment

Valerie June - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We were delighted to have singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Valerie June visit Amoeba San Francisco for a What's In My Bag? episode. A native Tennessean, June found some classic records by artists from her home state, including Big Star. "They say sometimes that music coming out of Memphis can only make it so far," she told us, "and that story kind of became a thing with them. To me they're (as) big as The Beatles." Not only does she feel connected to the music, but she also has recorded at Ardent Studios, where Big Star recorded some of their most beloved tracks. June had much to say about all of her eclectic choices, making for an insightful and sincere video. 

Valerie June began her music career at the age of nineteen. Based in Memphis, she first attracted attention through her solo work, which draws on elements of gospel, Americana, blues, folk, soul, Valerie June - The Order Of Timecountry, and bluegrass. In 2010, she recorded the Valerie June and the Tennessee Express EP with the help of Old Crow Medicine Show. She launched a Kickstarter to fund the album that would become her breakthrough, 2013's Pushin' Against a Stone. The LP was recorded with assistance from The Black KeysDan Auerbach and record producer Kevin Augunas.  

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Dirty Roots: Southern Hip-Hop Part I -- The 12" Era (1979-1983)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 16, 2015 07:21pm | Post a Comment

As far as my ears can tell, pretty near every rapper from Inglewood to Plumstead nowadays owes more than a little something to the rise of the Dirty South sound that pretty much took over hip-hop in the late 1990s. As anyone with more than a passing familiarity with the genre knows, however, southern hip-hop was for many years primarily a regional concern. In the 1970s the hip-hop scene was firmly centered in the Northeast. In the early 1980s it made its way to the West Coast but as far as mainstream audiences were concerned, skipped the third and fourth coasts. In the 1990s, many casual fans and scholars alike will tell you, there was a war between the East and West Coasts during some Southern upstarts crashed the party and, despite the efforts of the backpack Taliban, restored a sense of fun to a genre which had increasingly grown joyless and conservative. 

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