Amoeblog

Instrumental Sounds Somewhat from the Orient

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, November 30, 2019 06:50pm | Post a Comment

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La Show


In these modern times where audience snapping is the new clapping, where it is normal to have your cat get a reiki healing for depression, and where "Oriental" has been replaced by "Soy Sauce" flavor on Top Ramen packages, I offer you a non-controversial read about instrumental music somewhat from the Orient.

When one closes their eyes and thinks of the word "Orient," they may dream of a bustling Persian Martin Denny's Hypnotiquemarketplace with spice traders and fakirs gathering crowds, a Shambala-ish temple garden with mewing peacocks, or perhaps a rickshaw ride through a mysterious dark alley in old Hong Kong. But when you open your eyes and see the "Orient," it is usually on a party supply catalog full of plastic junk for Saint Patrick's Day, a fancy-pants hotel in Waikiki that you cannot afford to stay in but maybe steal some beach towels from, or perhaps even that amazing Vladimir Tretchikoff painting (as shown above) that your friend scored at a thrift store in Fresno that's still sitting in the trunk of their rusty Valiant. When it comes to music "from" the Orient, you may drift to thoughts of such exotica tunes as Tak Shindo's "Port of Trinkitat" or Martin Denny's "Hypnotique." I hope to open some new doors for you.

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Avey Tare of Animal Collective

Posted by Amoebite, July 8, 2019 07:04pm | Post a Comment

Avey Tare - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We were excited to have experimental indie pop artist Avey Tare (aka David Portner) share what he found shopping at Amoeba Hollywood in our latest What's In My Bag? episode. His eclectic selections were anything but pedestrian, as his taste ran the gamut from Nigerian Disco to new age and from avant-garde jazz to minimal techno.

Avey Tare is a solo artist and co-founder of Animal Collective. While in high school in Maryland, he met Josh Dibb (Deakin), Noah Lennox (Panda Bear), and Brian Weitz (Geologist); the friends shared homemade recordings and played in different band formations together. Portner and Weitz both moved to New York City after graduation and when they were joined by Dibb and Lennox, the longtime pals formed Animal Collective. In 2000, Avey Tare and Panda Bear released Spirit They're Gone, Spirit They've Vanished, which was later classified as the first official Animal Collective LP. 2001's Danse Manatee saw Avey Tare, Panda Bear, and Geologist joining forces. The bandmates played together in various groupings, sometimes releasing work as Animal Collective and sometimes releasing work under other monikers but it wasn't until 2004's Sung Tongs that the band really began attracting national attention.

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Sophisticated Voodoo Jazz of the 50's

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, May 15, 2018 01:25pm | Post a Comment

Mystery Skull

By Kai Wada Roath
Ambassador of Confusion Hill and host of the Super Shangri-La ShowRobert Drasnin, Voodoo

So, you just found a Mystic Skull board game with all the pieces at the swap-meet and you are having some friends coming over to play it before watching Val Lewton's 1943 classic, I Walked with a Zombie. You frustratingly find yourself digging through your vinyl vaults and cannot seem to find the right music to set the eerie atmosphere you desire. Let my red chicken foot charm point you the way to the records you seek...some for the music, others for their covers.

Robert Drasnin's 1959 album titled Voodoo, is truly superb. You can easily feel entranced from the music, luring your mind deep into a forbidden jungle while listening to "Chant of the Moon." If the stars are in alignment, you may be lucky enough to find this record on colored vinyl (I recently found a yellow one). Perhaps some of you may have even seen Robert Drasnin when he performed at the Tiki Oasis back in 2008.



Perez Prado's "Voodoo Suite" is the "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" of jungle jazz. From exotic drumming and primitive shouts and grunts to smooth jazz beats, this 23 minute piece makes you wish you were prowling on all fours like a tiger, hunting a scantly clad prey in the Jungle Rock Room at the Madonna Inn. Listen to it in its entirety, and if you stumble across this record in the wild do not hesitate in buying it. Pounce on it! In my humble opinion, this composition is a masterpiece.

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