Amoeblog

The New Amoeba SF Surfer Shirt

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 28, 2019 07:26pm | Post a Comment

We're thrilled to introduce the second in a series of California-inspired Amoeba SF shirts with the Amoeba SF Surfer tank and tee! This colorful retro design celebrates the unique culture of the Northern California coast line as our little buddy takes to the waves. These unisex tees and tanks run in sizes small through 2XL and are just $15.98 each, available online and at Amoeba SF. The tees are 100% cotton and tanks are an 80%/20% cotton/poly blend.

Our first tee celebrates the state song, “I Love You, California,” with our Amoeba standing in for the California grizzly bear hugging the great Golden State. Those t-shirts are available in unisex crewneck, slim fit scoop neck, and children’s sizes 2, 4, and youth large.

Both shirts in the series were designed by Amoeba SF’s own Luciano Talpini Aita and silk screened here in the Haight Ashbury District of SF by our good friends and neighbors, Free Gold Watch. Talk about Keeping it hyper-local, FGW is just a block away from Amoeba SF and has been printing Amoeba SF’s line of gear for many years! FGW’s store front contains one of the greatest pinball arcades in the Bay, so stop by, play some pinball, and support this wonderful, uniquely San Francisco business.

Continue reading...

At LAST: Kyle Field chats Little Wings' latest opus

Posted by Kells, April 7, 2013 03:20pm | Post a Comment

 
Photo by Adam Zeke             

Earlier this year worlds collided when Little Wings took the stage at Cafe du Nord, one of San Francisco's best preserved former mobster speak-easy joints that maintains decidedly authentic-feeling with shadowy vibes fully trimmed in dust-covered scarlet velvet. Looking like a costumed "tourist" complete with a plastic lei and something like a Greek fisherman's hat, Little Wings breezed through a delightfully unpredictable set of mostly new songs from his first ever double LP release, LAST, his borrowed backing band (The Range of Light Wilderness I believe, sharing the bill that evening) jamming over a few false starts before eventually leaning into the billowy groove of the nearly seven-minute "Neptune's Next" that opened the show. A hushed wave broke over the crowd, and it was then that I noticed, and I could be wrong, but  I think maybe I could see that Kyle's teeth were painted.

Accomplished visual artist, avid surfer, and "musician's musician" Kyle Field channels a great deal of his most personal energies and intuitive creative powers into recording and performing music as Little Wings, his ever-fluctuating entity that continues to inspire and challenge audience perceptions with multi-layered song cycles, subconscious-tapping lyrical head trips, and concurrent visual presentations that sometimes embrace an apparent love of adopting guises couched in a language of "the best costume for the day." Seemingly open to collaborations and improvisation, Field continues to garner praise from fans and contemporaries like Will Oldham a.k.a. Bonnie 'Prince Billy and Feist who not only named her 2010 documentary Look at What the Light Did Now after a Little Wings tune but also covered and performed it as a duet with Field as well. Though admirers may tend to paint him as something of a folk hero from time to time (this bromantic GQ piece on Kyle being a prime example), Field seems to play it close to the vest when it comes to his self-expression despite having publicly sharing so many personal pieces. I recently corresponded with him and learned a lot about the new album (2LP! out on Field's own Rad imprint via Marriage Records), what he's listening to lately, and "free friction" in surfing. Read on for the interview!


 This album seems to spring from a similar genesis as your previous album -- skulls, apples and a certain reflective darkness in tow. However, this record is by far your longest -- what happened? Is this record a lens cast upon a bigger picture? Was it your intention to release a double LP?
 

Continue reading...

California Fool's Gold -- Exploring Huntington Beach

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 9, 2011 08:00pm | Post a Comment
SHOOTING THE PIER -- HUNTINGTON BEACH


This blog entry is about Huntington Beach, a beach city in North Orange County. To Huntington Beach's southwestern edge is the Pacific Ocean. To its north are Seal Beach and Westminster. To the east is Fountain Valley. North and east is the Little Saigon area. To the southeast are the towns of Costa Mesa and Newport Beach.
 
     Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Map of Huntington Beach

It's the largest beach city in Orange County. Accompanying me on this installment was a mysterious new traveling companion and HB resident known only as Bao. As is usual, we being with a bit of history.


EARLY HISTORY OF HUNTINGTON BEACH


The area that now constitutes Huntington Beach was for thousands of years a border territory shared by the seafaring Tongva people to the north and the smaller Acagchemem nation to the south. At the time the area was an isolated mesa surrounded by a soggy expanse of bogs and shallow marshes fed by estuaries and artesian wells. At the western foot of the bluff was a large tidal lagoon.


THE SPANISH & MEXICAN RANCHO ERAS 


After the Spanish Conquest, European settlement in the area began in 1784, when veteran Spanish soldier Manuel Nieto was granted the large 1,200 km2 Rancho Los Nietos. The main route through the ranch was a cattle trail that's now Beach Boulevard. After Mexico achieved independence from Spain in 1822, the ranchos were secularized and subdivided, including into Rancho Los Alamitos and Rancho Las Bolsas where Huntington Beach now is.. American immigrants began arriving. Two years after the US declared war against Mexico (in 1846), ownership of California was transferred and more Americans arrived in the area.


THE AMERICAN ERA & PACIFIC CITY

A trader named Able Sterns acquired Rancho Los Alamitos and then the Rancho Las Bolsas. In 1862 Sterns sold the ranchos to The Los Angeles and San Bernardino Land Company, an agency for which Sterns acted as realtor. The large ranches were then subdivided and sold in smaller parcels and sold to farmers. In 1894, Colonel Robert J. Northam (then-manager of the Stearns Ranchos Company) acquired seven parcels. Much of the area was drained and seeded with barley, alfalfa and later, celery. A small succession of communities arose in the area of modern-day Huntington Beach including Shell Beach, Smeltzer, Gospel Swamp (a tent city community of Methodists pilgrims from Long Beach), Fairview and Pacific City.


Pacific City pier scene in the 1980s

Pacific City was envisioned as a west coast rival to New Jersey's Atlantic City by Philip A. Stanton and Colonel H. S. Finley who in 1901 formed The West Coast Land and Water Company through which they acquired 1,500 acres.


To give Pacific City some legitimacy, several structures were moved there from nearby Newport Beach. Stanton sold his interest the following year to a group headed by J. V. Vickers. Vickers wooed railway owner Henry E. Huntington with enticements in exchange for an extension of the Long Beach line to Pacific City. Perhaps chief among the inducements was the proposed change of name from Pacific City to Huntington Beach. Huntington changed the name of his company from West Coast Land and Water Company to The Huntington Beach Company and agreed.



EARLY HUNTINGTON BEACH

Huntington Beach was dedicated July 4, 1904 and the crowd of 50,000 witnessed the arrival of the first Pacific Red Car. The boom quickly died and by 1905, with the $126 purchase of an Encyclopedia Americana set, free parcels of land were given away. By then, celery and sugar beet cultivation dominated the economy. In 1906, the first school was built, Huntington Beach High School. The city of Huntington Beach was incorporated on February 17, 1909, under mayor Ed Manning.


Huntington Beach c. 1910


HUNTINGTON BEACH FLOWS AND GROWS


The original pier c. 1910

The original, wooden pier was destroyed in 1912. In 1914, the pier was replaced with a concrete one, primarily to support fishing. From 1910 to 1920 the small population of 815 more than doubled to 1,687. However, when Col. Northam dug a well to irrigate his alfalfa and struck oil in the Holly-Seacliff area, the economy of the sleepy seaside resort shifted focus.


Holly Sugar converted from processing beet sugar to oil refining. The Huntington Beach High School team changed their team name to The Oilers. The oil reserves were quickly depleted for the most part but numerous oil rigs still rhythmically bob (and there are several offshore rigs too). The last oil strike occurred in 1953. Growth came to an almost complete halt during the Great Depression.


In 1933, the Long Beach Earthquake struck - its epicenter was underneath Huntington Beach. 115 people were killed and $40 million worth of damage was done. In 1939, the Huntington Beach Pier was again destroyed and subsequently rebuilt. 


In the 1940s, growth in Huntington Beach resumed at a measured pace in the 1940s, with much of the city's land still devoted to oil production. The Huntington Beach Airport began operation in the mid-1940s, using as a runway a deposit of sediments left by the Flood of '38. It was still standing but had ceased operation by 1955. 
The East Long Beach Airport (later Sunset Beach Airport and finally Meadowlark Airport) was opened in 1947 by a nissei named Yukio "Dick" Nerio. It went public in the 1950s and continued operation until 1989. 
In 1957, Huntington Beach annexed a great deal of land between the original city and the proposed San Diego Freeway and the population growth reached a new peek during the decade.

 
In the 1960s the population increased almost tenfold, exploding from 11,492 to 115,960.


HB TERRORIZED IN THE 1970s

  
1970s serial killing creeps now rightfully rotting in prison

With most of the city by-then developed, population was slowed since the 1970s. During the decade, Huntington Beach (and nearby areas) were terrorized by a serial killer from Long Beach, Randy Steven Kraft, a pro-Vietnam War activist/Barry Goldwater-supporter and bartender at a Huntington Beach gay bar. In 1968 he joined the Air Force but was discharged the following year for being gay and he resumed bar tending. In 1970, Kraft gained the trust of a thirteen-year-old runaway he met on the Huntington Beach pier. After Kraft took him home, drugged and raped him, he went to work and the victim escaped. The victim led the cops to the apartment who found drugs and the victim's shoes… but since the search was conducted with a warrant, Kraft wasn't charged. In 1971, Kraft found work at a bottled water plant in HB. That year police found a decomposing body next to the freeway, believed to have been Kraft's first murder victim. For the next eleven years, dozens of men were murdered, mainly in North Orange County and The Harbor. After his arrest, police recovered a "death list" that claimed 67 victims, 22 of them not found. 

Huntington Beach was again rocked by violence when Rodney Alcala kidnapped and murdered a Huntington Beach twelve year old on her way to ballet class in 1979.


NATIVE ACTIVISM



In the 1970s, Native activists began fighting for preservation of sites of historical importance, especially the Bolsa Chica Wetlands (near the dump site, coincidentally, of one Kraft's teenage victims). In the 2000s, the developers of the Brightwater Hearthside Homes subdivision began churning up bones and artifacts dating back up to 8,500 years. In 2006 the state approved continued reconstruction as long as the disturbed human remains were reinterred somewhere else. In 2008, the remains of 174 Tongva bodies uncovered by workers who've apparently never watched Poltergeist!

HB IN THE 1980s


OP Pro Riot

The 1980s seem to have ushered in even more lawless age in Hungtington Beach.  In 1980, half-sisters Gina Narano, 15, and Cynthia Chandler, 16, disappeared from Huntington Beach and were found the next day on the roadside, shot to death and raped by a former Navy admiral, Douglas Clark. The same year, an 18-year police veteran was jailed in HB after molesting numerous children. In 1981, Tommy Gomez was arrested on two counts for a gang rape of a Huntington Beach woman. In 1984, Elizabeth Hoffschneider was brutally raped, beaten and murdered in a case that took over two decades to solve. On Labor Day, in 1986, a massive disturbance happened downtown and near the pier which came to be known as the OP Pro Riot. In the late 1980s, there was a push from law enforcement and for redevelopment. The first obvious sign of a new age was the rebuilding of the pier in January, 1988. 
HB IN THE 1990s 

The 1990s began innocently enough. Tthe first notable local news item came when HB resident Gary Stewart set a new world record for pogo jumping in May, 1990, continuously bouncing for twenty hours and twenty minutes. However, the dark ages continued into the early 1990s.
Wayne Ichija Yoshisato of Huntington Beach was charged with murder in the July, 1990, for fatal beating of his girlfriend's 14- month old daughter which he committed after raping the mother. In August of the same year, 15-year old Tri Tue Thanh Kha murdered a gang rival at the Huntington Beach Boys and Girls Club. In 1991, however, a poll of Huntington Beach found that 98% of residents viewed their city favorably, despite pollution, traffic and crime. 
Though plagued by a troubling level of racially motivated violence (usually against blacks, Asians and Latinos), Huntington Beach seems to have regained peace from truly grisly crime during the latter part of the 1990s. There remain, of course, exceptions. In the 2000s, there was the case of Ian W. Allen, a 23 year-old self-professed Satanist who conspired with his teenage girlfriend to kill her mother by stabbing her over fifty times, stuffing her in a box and dumping it in Newport Harbor. Aside from that case, and still not-infrequent hate crimes and harassment, Huntington Beach has, like most of America, improved since the festering 1980s and early 1990s and remains lower than the national average. Today, the population of Huntington Beach is 77% white, 17% Asian/Pacific Islander and 17% Latino of any race. The top employers are Boeing, Quiksilver and Cambro


THE MARSHES


A large, beautiful marsh, the Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve, lies between Downtown Huntington Beach and Huntington Harbour and remains largely undisturbed. A $110 million restoration of the wetlands was completed in 2006. There is a small, free parking lot that should not be confused with the adjacent beach parking, which costs $15. Also, there is no crosswalk between the two. The flora and especially fauna change with the seasons and on the early summer day we visited there were pelicans, least terns, clapper rails, two black-necked stillts and maybe some western snowy plovers.


The waters are home to grey smoothound sharks, round stingrays but, most terrifying were the massive, revolting, capitvating slug-like California Sea Hares. There were also many birders snapping pictures. One was accompanied by his young son who carried a small bow and said, "ah juh shi! ah juh shi!" to me.  I've heard that before but was unsure of the meaning. South of Downtown are more, smaller marshes; the Talbert, Newland Brookhurst and Magnolia Marshes, which lie behind Huntington State Beach.


HUNTINGTON BEACH'S BEACHES 

The northern and southernmost beaches, Bolsa Chica State Beach and Huntington State Beach, respectively, are state parks and only Huntington City Beach is maintained by the town. Camping and RVs are permitted and popular at Bolsa Chica, which is a sandbar separating the Bolsa Chica wetlands from the ocean. A portion known as "the cliffs" is home to a dog beach. Sunset Beach is maintained by Orange County and lies between the ocean and the city's marinas.


Huntington City Beach is popular with sand volleyball players, surfers and huge crowds of others. It also boasts the pier, which provides lovely views of the city, the oil rigs, the aquamarine-colored waves and the smokestacks in the distance. Huntington State Beach borders the southern marshes and ends at the mouth of the Santa Ana River.


SURFING SURF CITY

With four beaches and a consistent surf, Huntington Beach has long been popular with practitioners of the sport. The first road large redwood board in the 1920s. In 1955, Gordon Duane opened the city's first surf shop, Gordie Surfboards.

 

In 1959, the first West Coast Surfing Championships were held in Huntington Beach. The Huntington Beach Surf Club was established in 1963 with over seventy members. Huntington Beach, in fact, has trademarked the nickname "Surf City." The U.S. Open of Surfing and Beach Games are held in Huntington Beach.




Huntington Beach is also home to the International Surfing Museum, which features the Surfers' Hall of Fame, surf-related exhibits and, on Sundays, the back lot hosts surf bands.


Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku


On the day of our visit, we were treated to the sounds of Tower 21 and 3 Balls of Fire.


 
Statue of Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku


Bao and the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame

Outside the museum is the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame honoring those who've contributed to surf culture.


MAIN STREET 


By the 1980s, Main Street Huntington Beach had acquire a reputation as a haven for drug-dealing, prostitution and violent crime. In 1983, the city approved a redevelopment plan and condos and businesses began popping up in the years that followed. Tourists and locals descended on the revived district and in April of 2011, the LA Times reported that revenue for the area was by then twenty times what it had been in 1988.

The area is the site of many of Huntington Beach's local events. Every Tuesday, Surf City Nights includes food booths and live, free entertainment. In March, the Beachcruiser Meet showcases hundreds of classic cars in the Main and Pier parking lot. Miracle on Main Street is the name for the Main Street Christmas Tree lighting ceremony. The third Wednesday of every month there's the Huntington Beach Art Walk. Chili at the Beach is a chili cook-off which benefits the Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) and occurs during the Fathers' Day Weekend.


However, when the sun goes down the families go home and a three-block stretch of Main Street takes on a different character, that of the "Jersey Shore of the West." Although the alcohol sales help fuel the economy, Huntington Beach is ranked No. 1 in victims killed and injured in alcohol-involved traffic accidents among cities its size in the state. Even though the sun was still up on the day of my visit, I did witness an SUV packed with young men pumping their fists to trance, presumably in anticipation of the night's drunken debauchery (e.g. beer pong, more fist pumping, public urination). The cops even have a special code for drunks breaking into someone else's house to pass out because it's so common, a "Downtown 459."


THE HUNTINGTON BEACH PIER


Main street ends (or continues) onto the Huntington Beach Pier, the longest municipal concrete pier in California. It's another popular site for Huntington Beach events. Every year in May, the Sunset Wine Tasting at the Pier features wines from around California and raises money to benefit AltaMed's Huntington Beach Community Clinic, which serves thousands of uninsured and medically underserved patients. The following two days, the Annual Duck-a-thon is held in the water off the pier, a rubber ducky race.


On the day of our visit, the DJs in a booth representing KIIS FM hyped the crowd of four children.



At the mouth of the pier, Pier Plaza, street performers wowed the crowds and drum circle-types pounded away.


PARKS - THE OTHER ATTRACTIONS


Huntington Beach was a very large, beautiful Central Park. The parking lot is landscaped with attractive xeric plants (nice!) and there are fairly developed forests with large Blue Gum Eucalyptus.


It's also the location of the Richard Neutra and Dion Neutra-designed Huntington Beach Public Library (which was closed on the day of our visit). A Concours d'Elegance (a prestigious car show) is held at Central Park in June and benefits the public library. On the other side of the street is the Huntington Central Park Equestrian Center.



On the day we visited there was a large crowd gathered for live music under an inflatable band shell.


HB EVENTS





In addition to the aforementioned events, Huntington Beach hosts a biathlon in July. A Fourth of July parade has been held annually since 1904. The Cruise of Lights Boat Tour is held in the Huntington Harbour neighborhood. The annual Kite Festival is held in late February. An informal "Donut Derelicts" car show occurs every Saturday morning at the intersection of Adams and Magnolia Street. Huntington Beach also hosts the National Professional Paintball League Super 7 Paintball Championships in March


THE SHOPPING

There are two major shopping areas in Huntington Beach, Bella Terra and Old World Village. Bella Terra is a large, outdoor shopping center. In its amphitheater, live music is performed regularly. There are also regularly-held special events for kids. It opened in 1996 and was built on the ruins of the old, indoor mall, the Huntington Beach Center.


In the shadow of the Towers at Bella Terra, a group of tall business complexes, is the Old World Village… a much older outdoor mall with a German theme (that can feel, during slow times, like a Bavarian ghost town). The 50 buildings were built, I believe, in 1978.


It's just the sort of fading, charming simulacrum that I like. It hosts numerous events including Dachshund Races, classic car shows, RICO's Comedy Revival Show!, the Plum Festival, German Heritage Day and, biggest of all, Oktoberfest.


As I wondered the winding, shady streets I saw only one other soul… sitting still as stone on a bench… kind of creepy in an abandoned-theme-park kind of way ...and a total HB gem! Read my Block By Block post, Kitsch and Kultur: Exploring SoCal Bavaria, for more. 


HB EATS

For a city it's size, Huntington Beach has an insane amount of places to eat. The people love to eat and, not surprisingly, it hosts the annual  Taste of Huntington BeachPerhaps the most celebrated joint was the Golden Bear, which opened in 1929 and became a popular nightclub in 1963. It hosted the likes of BB King, Janis Joplin, Steve Martin, Charles Bukowski and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Unfortunately it was demolished in 1986.Especially well-represented are Italian, Mexican and sandwich joints seem to be especially well-represented but in the HB, eating, drinking, music, TV all seem to go hand in hand so here's a let of eateries and drinkeries of different stripes. We, nonetheless, ate at Bodhi Tree, a nice, tasteful and tasty Vietnamese joint.

Other options include: Adami, Alberto's, Aloha Grill, Aloha Hawaiian BBQ, An's Restaurant, Avila's El Ranchito, Aztecas, Bagelmania & Coffee House, Baci, Baci di Roma Trattoria, Baja Sharkeez, Basilico's Pasta e Vino, BBQ Bistro, Beach Burgers, Beach Pit BBQ, Beachfront 301, Bella Roma, Bhodi Tree Cafe, Black Bull Chop House, Big Chopsticks, Buffalo Wings 'N Things, Bukhara, Bun & Burger, Buon Gusto, Burtucci's New York Pizza, Cafe Enchante, Caffe Gazelle, Cancun,

Capones Italian Cucina, Casa Jimenez, Catalina Fish Kitchen, Catch of the Day, Cavallino Ristorante, Centerfield Sports Bar, Champa, Cherry On Top, Chicago Ribs, China Kitchen, Charo Chicken, Chronic Tacos, Coach's Deli, Coache's Mediterranean Grill, Cobantigua Cafe, Corner Bakery, Crabby's Boat House, Crivello Ristorante Italiano, Cucina Alessa, Daimon, Daphne's California Greek, De Simone Bakery & Delicatessen, Deli-licious, Deville, Digg's, Don Jose's Mexican Restaurant,

Don the Beachcomber, Don Ramon's, Dukes
Dwight's Beach Concession, East Winds Asian Cuisine, Eat at Joe's, El Chavito, Eggroll King, Endless Food & Fun, Esther's Place, Euro Market Bakery & Deli, Fiesta Grill & Catering, Fiesta Grill 2, Fish Camp, Fitzgerald's Pub, Five Guys Burger and Fries, Frank's Big O Pizza, Fred's Mexican Cafe, Fresca's, Fritzankotters, Fuji's Famous Burger, Gallagher's Pub & Grill, George's, Golden Chopsticks, Gong's Chinese Food, Good Day Cafe, Great Wok,

Green Rice Kabob, Hank's West Pizza, Harry's Cafe, Harvey's Steakhouse, Hashigo Sushi, Hero's Pub, Himalayan Grill, Honeybaked Ham Co, Hot and Spicy Thai, Hot Off the Grill, House of Brews, Huckleberry's Famous Sandwiches, Huntington Beach Beer Company & Restaurant
 Hurricane's Bar & Grill, In-N-Out Burger, Inca Gourmet, Irassae, Islands, Jan's Health Bar, Jersey Mike's Subs, Joe's Sushi, John's Philly Grille, Johnny's Saloon, Jon's Coffee Shop, Joy Sushi, Ka Shabu,

Kathy May's Restaurant, Kelly's Donuts and Burgers, Kiku Restaurant, Killarney Pub & Grill, King's Fish House, King's Pizza, Kirby's Surf City PizzaLa Brique Steakhouse, La Choza Restaurant, La Fontana Ristorante, LaRocco's Pizzeria, Lamppost Pizza, Las Barcas, La Capilla, La Casita, La Petite Baquette, Lee's Lucky Wok, Linda's Mexican Restaurant, Lino's Pizzeria, Longboard, Los Primos Cantina, Lotus Chinese Eatery, Lou's Oak Oven Barbecue, Lucci's Deli, Luggatti's,
 Luigi's

Malibu Fish Grill, Mama's on 39, Mangia-Mangia, Mangiamo Gelato Caffe, Mario's, Mario's Fiesta Maya, Market Broiler, Marlin Bar and Grill, Massimo's Pizza, Matsu Restaurant, Mazara Trattoria, Mike Thai Bros Bistro, Minimex Everywhere, Mitasie 3, Molcajete Grill, Mona Lisa Italian Cucina, Monkey House Cafe, Mother's Market & Kitchen, Mr P's Espresso Italiano Caffe, My Place, Niya, No Ka Oi, Nonna Lucci's, Norm's, Normita's Surf City Taco, O'Connell's, OC Juice N Gyro, Ocean Pacific Market,

Oceans Sushi & Oyster Lounge, Oggi's Pizza & Brewing Company, Olive Pit, Old World German Restaurant, Pacific Coast Hot Dogs, Pacific Crust Sandwiches, Pancho Frijoles, Panda Palace, Park Bench Café, Pee Wee's Famous Hot Dogs and Hamburgers, Peet's Coffee & Tea, Pei Wei, Pelican Isle, Perq's, Perry's Pizza, Peruvian Rotisserie Chicken, Pete's Sunset Grille, Photastic!, Phuket Thai Restaurant, Pick Up Stix,
 Pizza D'oro, Pizzarito, Polly's Pies, Porky's PizzaRA Sushi Bar, Randazzo,

Rathskeller, Red Chair Lounge, Robek's Juice, Rockin' Baja Coastal Cantina, Rockin' Crepes, Rodrigo's, Sakura Shabu Shabu, Sakurai, Sammy's, Sancho's Tacos, Sandy's Beach Grill, Sango Sushi, Sea Siam, Sebastiani's Italian Bistro, 2nd Floor Food ART Drinks, Secret Spot, Shades, Shima, Shogun, Shooters Sports Bar and Grill, Silk Thai Cuisine, Slapfish Truck, Slow Fish, Soya, Spark Woodfire Grill, St George Pizza, Suds Surf City Sports Grill, Sugar Shack Cafe, Sullivan,

Sunny's Waffle House, Super Mex, Sushi on Fire, Suhsi Top, Sushi Ya, Sweet Elle Café
Sweet O Donuts, T'Kila, Tacone Flavor Grill, Tacos Jerez, Tacos el Chavito, Tacos Jerez, Taqueria Don Victor, Taste of France, Thai Gulf, Thai Pepper, Thai Wave, The Bread Crumb, The Californian, The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, The Corner, The Donuttery, The Firepit, The Gourmet Crepe Company, The Loft, The Orange Dog, The Seafood Zone, Three Monkies Japanese Kitchen, TK Burgers, Todai, Tokyo Deli,

The Wok Experience, Tower 15 Pizzeria, Tsunami, Tumbleweeds, Tuna Town, 25 Degrees
, Two Brothers Pizza, Valentino's, Vittorio's, Waba Grill, Wahoo's Fish Taco, Whata Lotta Pizza, Woody's Diner, Z Pizza, Zimzala and Zubies Dry Dock.



NIGHTLIFE 

With booze, karaoke and food mixing so readily, perhaps it should come as less of a surprise that there are far fewer clubs than bar & grills vying for nigh owls. There's the gay Ibiza Bar & Nightclub, the strip club Simply Seductive and, my favorite, the mostly Asian crowd-attracting Avec Nightclub, where Vietnamese New Wave is often played and danced to.


THE HUNTINGTON BEAT



For a city as associated with surfing, it may come as a bit of a surprise that the surf music of the 1950s and '60s didn't produce any major acts that I'm aware of. It was mentioned, however, in "Surfer Joe" by The Surfaris as well as "Surfin' Safari" by The Beach Boys. Oh, and Ashlee Simpson's music video for "La La" was filmed in Huntington Beach. HB did produce a number of famous punk bands, however, including The Vandals, The Offspring and Reel Big Fish. There are also bands that drew upon punk as well as other genres including bands like The Dirty Heads, Hellogoodbye and Avenged Sevenfold. Huntington Beach-born musicians include Matt Costa and Keri Kelli. Other Huntington Beach bands include Millionaires and smaller acts. DJ Culture is Huntington Beach's primary electronic music store and Vinyl Solution is the main punk store.


FILM(ED) IN HB


The Surf Theatre was a famous and beloved theater located near the pier that showed independent surf films including Endless Summer and Fiver Summer Stories. It was owned and operated by Hugh Larry Thomas from 1961 until it was demolished in 1989.

Today, the SoCal Independent Film Festival takes place every September. The Southland's PBS station, KOCE-TV, is broadcast from the city's Golden West College Campus. HB was the subject of the TruTV series Ocean Force - Huntington Beach.

It's also served as a filming location for All that I Need, BoardRoom, Children of the X-Files, Convict, Frost/Nixon, Hallowed, Kate So Far, Lava Lounge, Locked In, Marmaduke, 90210, Pink Lemonade, Raspberry & Lavender, Rats & Bullies, Route 66, Slasher, Starsky & Hutch, Surf Nazis Must Die, The Born Losers, The Hog, The Legends of Nethiah, The Living Curl, The OC, The Plotters, Triangle Square and Waterworld.

HB is also the birthplace of actresses Amy Grabow and Bridgette Monet (born Dana Kunath Height).


WEIRDO CHRISTIANS

One last note about my day in HB. When I returned to the CARDIS, someone had written in the dust on the rear window, "Jesus loves u... doubt it", "wash me" and "the power of Christ compels you." Huntington Beach has a history of "Jesus freaks" too. In 1968, when his mother died, her son David Berg took control of her tiny Christian and Missionary Alliance congregation and began recruiting hippie Teens for Jesus. In 1969, he changed the name to The Children of God and left Huntington Beach. By 1970, the Children of God were receiving guidance (via Berg) from Abrahim, a 13th century Bulgarian king. In the early 1970s, Berg started pimping female followers for Christ in a practice called "Flirty Fishing." They've since called themselves The Family of Love, The Family and now, The Family International… could this have been their work? or was it that Korean family who parked next to me… anyway, message received. Till next time, shaka brah!

*****
To vote for other Orange County communities or neighborhoods, please click here. To vote for Los Angeles County communities, click here. To vote for Los Angeles neighborhoods, click here


*****


Follow Eric's Blog and check out more episodes of California Fool's Gold

Bud Browne 1912 - 2008

Posted by Whitmore, July 31, 2008 08:32am | Post a Comment


Last week ‘the father of surf films,’ Bud "Barracuda" Browne, the onetime lifeguard who began showing his 16-millimeter movies commercially in the early 1950’s, died in his sleep at his home in San Luis Obispo. He was 96.

Born July 12th, 1912, in Newtonville, Massachusetts, Browne began swimming competitively at age seven. He attended USC, was captain of the swim team and in 1933 ranked second in the nation as a collegiate swimmer. While working as a lifeguard at Venice Beach in late thirties, Browne was introduced to surfing. In 1938 he went to Hawaii to ride the big waves in Waikiki, taking along an 8-millimeter movie camera to film the local surfers. One his first and most prized reels of film recorded the legendary king of the surfers Duke Kahanamoku.

During World War II, Browne served as a navy chief specialist in athletics (earning the nickname "Barracuda" for his long lean look). Following the war he became a teacher in Los Angeles, working as a middle-school physical education instructor and also attended USC Film School. He upgraded his camera to a 16-millimeter Bell & Howell. In 1953, after spending several years filming surfers in Hawaii, Browne pieced together enough footage to compile a 45-minute film. Hawaiian Surfing Movie debuted at John Adams Middle School in Santa Monica.

Browne eventually gave up his teaching gig and took to chronicling the 1950’s surf scene full time, releasing at least one movie a year between 1953 and 1964. With films such as Trek to Makaha, The Big Surf, Surf Down Under, Cavalcade of Surf, Locked In and Gun Ho!, Browne documented all the surfing greats of the longboard era, like Phil Edwards, Buzzy Trent, Greg Noll, Miki Dora, Linda Benson and Dewey Weber, plus the first-generation of shortboard riders, like David Nuuhiwa, Nat Young and Gerry Lopez. In addition to completing nearly 20 of his own films, he also contributed footage to other projects such as Big Wednesday, directed by John Milius, Greg McGillivray/Jim Freeman’s Waves of Change (also known as The Sunshine Sea) and their 1972 classic Five Summer Stories. In the early 1990’s Browne began re-editing some of his earlier efforts. The first project, Surfing the 50's, honed his best color footage from the eight films he produced during the fifties. That success led to re-releasing some of his other movies such as the 1963 classic, Gun Ho!.

As a surf-film pioneer, Browne had a huge influence on those who came after him like Bruce Brown (The Endless Summer) and photographer John Severson. Bud Browne was inducted into the International Surfing Hall of Fame in 1991 and the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame in 1996. This past March, he was honored at the San Luis Obispo International Film Festival for his lifetime achievements to the genre of surf films.

Here is some of Browne’s footage used in a Hamms Beer commercial from 1965.

Continue reading...

NYC EXTREME SPORTS: YOU COULD DIE

Posted by Billyjam, November 10, 2007 03:00am | Post a Comment

Recently in New York City a 21 year old "subway surfer" was killed after getting bounced off a moving C line train. Subway surfing is the dare-devil stunt that involves riding either atop or clinging to the side of a moving train. While popular in certain South American and European cities (including in Denmark, where the documentary excerpt below is from), it has only been sporadically popular in New York City's MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority) subway system over recent years, and for good reason. The stunt has a very high probability of ending in fatal disaster due to the tight space between the train and the MTA tunnels. Unlike in other foreign cities, where the trains are mostly outdoors, the MTA run mainly through underground tunnels. Four years ago there were several subway-surfing fatalities on New York's subway system within a short time span -- apparently inspired by some publicity about the practice at that time. Since then, the MTA has initiated a campaign educating those foolish enough to try surfing a New York subway car.


In comparison, the relatively tame, although still illegal and dangerous, annual Broadway Bomb -- a race in which about a hundred daredevil skateboarders roll from uptown to downtown Manhattan along Broadway from 116th Street all the way down to Bowling Green, which is eight and half miles, dodging cars, buses, and taxis and ignoring traffic lights along the way -- went without incident two Sundays ago in New York City.  And even though the motto for the event is "You could die," no one has so far. But then, the event is held on a Sunday when there is very little traffic in NYC compared to weekdays. There is also talk that the event, which already has sponsors, may soon become legit.

Continue reading...
<<  1  2  >>  NEXT