Amoeblog

10 Vinyl Releases Still Available From Record Store Day 2016

Posted by Billy Gil, April 18, 2016 02:40pm | Post a Comment

Did you miss Record Store Day this weekend? You can read about the day’s activities here. As far as releases go, we still have several titles available in limited quantities. These are available in-store at Amoeba Hollywood and online as of the time of this writing, but as quantities are low and demand is high, you should act fast if you want anything on this list!

Big Star Complete Columbia: Live at University of Missouri 4/25/93

One of the great cult bands of all time, Big Star reformed for a live show 20 years after burning out after two fanatical student DJs from University of Missouri asked them to. The lineup consisted of original singer/guitarist Alex Chilton and drummer Jody Stephens with The Posies’ Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow. It’s the first time the performance has been commercially available and has been mastered from the original tapes, adding five performances to a 1993 release. Limited to 4,000 copies total.

 

 

 

 

Bob Dylan Melancholy Mood 7”

bob dylan melancholy mood 7" record store dayFour new songs by Bob Dylan, originally released as a Japanese tour-only EP. The songs come from Dylan’s upcoming covers album, Fallen Angels.

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10 Releases to Look For on Record Store Day 2016

Posted by Billy Gil, March 30, 2016 10:43am | Post a Comment

Record Store Day is coming April 16, bringing loads of exclusive records to record stores around the country. You can see everything that’s coming to Amoeba here and everything we have in store for the day thus far here, including sales, DJs and more. Here are 10 releases we’re looking forward to picking up on RSD.

 

David Bowie The Man Who Sold The World [Picture Disc]

david bowie the man who sold the world picture disc record store dayDavid Bowie’s unfortunate passing has left us all with a thirst for all things Bowie. Some of his best-loved albums were recently re-released on vinyl, and the latest to get the reissue treatment is his third album. It’s best known for the title track, especially after being covered by Nirvana on their Unplugged LP, but The Man Who Sold the World represents a turning point in Bowie’s career as his music turned heavier and lyrics darker, setting an important precedent for goth rock, among other influences the album would have.

 

J Dilla - The Diary [LP+7''] 

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode With Marshall Crenshaw

Posted by Amoebite, January 13, 2015 07:02pm | Post a Comment

Marshall Crenshaw

Marshall Crenshaw is an accomplished musician, singer and songwriter. He's co-written a ton of songs and has composed music for film and television, including the title track for the film Walk Hard, starring John C. Riley. Not to mention he's got a knack for acting too! Prior to becoming a recording artist, Crenshaw played the role of John Lennon in the Broadway musical Beatlemania. Crenshaw also played Buddy Holly in the Ritchie Valens biopic, La Bamba

Marshall's break came after he and his brother Robert started a New York based trio. They recorded the single "Something's Gonna Happen," which led to a deal with Warner Brothers. Crenshaw's eponymous debut album was released in 1982 and included the song "Someday, Someway," which reached #36 on the Billboard Top 100 chart. The '90s Pop rock band, Gin Blossoms' song, "Til I Hear It from You," was co-written by Crenshaw and it reached #11 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1996. The dude knows a thing or two about writing hit songs. 

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New 12"s @ Amoeba Hollywood 6/7 - Sun Ra: Mike Huckaby edits, Rising Sun, Vladislav Delay, Matias Aguayo, Traxx & more

Posted by Oliver / Matt / Jordan, June 7, 2011 04:07pm | Post a Comment
Sun Ra
The Mike Huckaby Reel To Reel Edits Vol. 1 12"
Kindred Spirits

During afterhours, Mike Huckaby produces Sun Ra edits from a dancefloor perspective, using only a mixer and a reel-to-reel player. Now, some of his finest edits are released on The Mike Huckaby Reel To Reel Edits series, containing reworks of classic tracks from the Art Yard catalog which were previously-released on the collaborative series between Art Yard and Kindred Spirits. Housed in a full-color outersleeve including a silkscreen-printed plastic insert by L.A. designer Stephen Serrato. Limited quantities, so don't miss out!

Purchase The Mike Huckaby Reel To Reel Edits Vol. 1  here:




Rising Sun

Lift Up Your Faces 12"
Fauxpas Musik

Fauxpas Musik welcomes Rising Sun, who also runs labels such as Styrax and Millions Of Moments and their respective sub-labels."Lift Up Your Faces" is a grounding yet epic tale in best Bobby Konders manner, flowing and warm. Julius Steinhoff takes it to the floor. "Lonely Clarinet" and "The Sun Orchestra" sing with the birds, funking the last dark thought out and spreading pure love. This limited beautiful piece of colored vinyl comes with an extra-large poster done by Paetrick Schmidt.

Purchase Lift Up Your Faces 12" here:




Vladislav Delay Quartet
Vladislav Delay Quartet 2LP
Honest Jons

Vladislav Delay has always been a maverick artist. But after relocating to Hailuoto, Finland in 2008, what he calls "absolute freedom" has become the de facto muse guiding his music. On 2009's Tummaa, Delay cracked open ambient dub's hermetically-sealed aesthetic and ushered in elements of jazz-fusion, free improv and industrial noise. Tummaa is dark, restless and challenging. It's also a stepping stone, one that leads directly to Vladislav Delay Quartet, the musician's most radical statement to date. Though this absolute freedom is inextricably linked to the relative isolation of his Finnish home, Delay's latest record is very much a product of collective participation and multiple locales. In Derek Shirley, Lucio Capece and Mika Vainio, Delay has found three musicians more than willing to translate such a non-negotiable concept into sound. A balance is reached between individuality and the demands of the unit. The album's opening salvo -- "Minus Degrees, Bare Feet, Tickles" -- is a commanding declaration of independence. Layered with murky static, churning woodwinds and bowed bass, the music is visceral and unsettling. It also has nothing to do with ambient, dub or the myriad micro-genres they have spawned. This is noise -- vital 21st-century electronic noise that cuts a sharp angle between Borbetomagus' wicked maximalism and the wraith-like aggression coursing through black metal's more drone-based manifestations. That said, VDQ doesn't deal in sonic aggression, exclusively. Spotlighting Capece's soaring, avian reed-work, "Killing The Water Bed" is a vaporous foray into avant-garde jazz; "Presentiment" is deep, liquid blues, dripping suggestively from the celluloid of a long-forgotten sci-fi noir. The penultimate piece, "Louhos," is easily the record's most brutal in terms of rhythm, volume and density. Recalling free jazz and heavy metal's cacophonous flirtations in the late 1980s, the massive rock-beat anchoring the maelstrom swirling about it wouldn't feel out of place on Last Exit's Iron Path or even Ground Zero's epic Consume Red. Eventually, clattering electronics, fuzz-spiked percussion and a scalding wash of reeds rise up. Obliterating all forward propulsion by track's end, they leave a hazy cloud of reverb and feral cries in their wake. Recorded at the former Radio Yugoslavia studios in Belgrade throughout one week, Vladislav Delay Quartet is an expansive and multifaceted listening experience. In Delay's scrupulous production, the ensemble's raw and natural interaction finds a deep coherence: the articulation of absolute freedom. Vladislav Delay (drums, percussion), Lucio Capece (saxophone, bass clarinet), Derek Shirley (double bass) and Mika Vainio (electronics, live processing).

Purchase Vladislav Delay Quartet 2LP here:



Matias Aguayo
I Don't Smoke EP 12"
Kompakt

Matias Aguayo returns to Kompakt with his first new recordings for the label since 2009's acclaimed full-length Ay Ay Ay (KOMP 076CD/KOM 205LP). Aguayo takes it back to the dancefloor with his first foray into house music. I Don't Smoke is here -- pure electronic body music. The music here is a tour diary of sorts -- tried and tested on the crowds, these tracks were improved and built up, then finally mixed down with Scott Monteith aka Deadbeat.

Purchase I Don't Smoke EP 12" here:




Vincenzo
Wherever I Lay My Head 2x12"
Dessous

Finally, Dessous key artist Vincenzo is back in the spotlight with his third full-length album. Some nine years after Welcome To Zanarkand (DES 006CD), his last long-player, the Berlin-based producer has been making magic in the studio, crafting what is sure to be his greatest work yet. Wherever I Lay My Head is a glorious journey through rich, spiritual and stunningly-crafted electronic sounds. Vincenzo's crystal-clear production and years of writing experience have culminated in this heroic new work. Two songs feature U.S. house vocalist Lisa Shaw.

Purchase Wherever I Lay My Head 2x12" here:



Massimiliano Pagliara
Focus For Infinity 2LP
Live At Robert Johnson

Massimiliano Pagliara moved from Lecce to Milan to pursue a dream, approaching club culture from an academic angle, which led to a diploma in theater-dance and choreography. And then Milan's alternative club scene gave him even more hints of what music was out there, seemingly waiting to be morphed into his very own vision of sound. After he moved to Berlin, this urge became stronger, and soon dancing in an academic context was just not enough, and dancing in legendary clubs like Ostgut took over, until he felt ready and willing to join in the buzz as a DJ. And not before long, Massimiliano Pagliara was the one who got the same crowds moving he formerly was an enthusiastic part of, with knowledgeable selections touching a plethora of bases from disco and house origins, spiked with a good dose of the unexpected, leftfield, obscure and overall utmost grooviness. All of this is delivered with his very own super-charming demeanor, styled with both grace and conviction, coming on like the sweet missionary of nocturnal bliss. And as much as he loves playing the music he loves, producing the music he loves was the obvious next step to take. Having developed an obsession with analog synth sounds, Pagliara gathered vintage equipment and holed up in his studio to work on producing the music he always wanted to produce. And the results were so convincing that they led Daniel Wang to release his debut single on his legendary Balihu imprint. Since then he has spread his lovely melodies and infectious grooves to mainstays like Rush Hour Recordings, Meakusma, Needwant and eventually the seminal club and label haven, Robert Johnson. And thus, Focus For Infinity came to life, Massimiliano Pagliara's testament to his own inspirations and preferences, transferred into a superb voyage of disco and house transcendentalism that owes as much to electronic pioneers like Patrick Cowley as it does to the legacy of the defining days of Italo disco, synth-pop and Chicago house. But however he may have put his Prophet 5, Korgs and Rolands into action, this album is clearly not clinging to paying tributes. It aims to sing its own song, and dance to its own rhythm. Judging from his acclaimed achievements, it may come as no surprise that this album sounds diverse and personal and is executed with dedication and grandezza.  

Purchase Focus For Infinity 2LP  here:



Gene Hunt
Chicago Dance Tracks Part 2 2LP
Rush Hour

Part two of two 2LPs of never-before-released tracks from the archives of Gene Hunt -- rare, newly-unearthed Chicago house barn-stormers from the '80s. Gene Hunt shares his ancient treasures with us -- up to now, this stuff resided only on reels! Featuring a truly all-star line-up. Part 2 includes unreleased tracks from Virgo Four, Craig Loftis, Farley Keith Williams, Virgo & Adonis and even a track by Dion, who later on went on to kickstart Common's career and more recently has been Kanye West's sidekick. Also included is a rework of Lil Louis' "Video Clash" and a mash-up of Marshall Jefferson and a Larry Heard track, which was a Music Box/Ron Hardy favorite. The vinyl release holds seven tracks, all presented in their original length and includes one vinyl-only bonus track, Virgo & Adonis' "Trust." All tracks have been restored and remastered from the original, first generation reel-to-reel tapes. The artwork shows original Chicago flyers and the release comes with an insert with artist interviews, a Gene Hunt interview by Jackmaster Farley and original photos from back in the day. Also features reworks by Zernell Gillie and DJ Cease aka George Dupree.

Purchase Chicago Dance Tracks Part 2 2LP here:



Traxx
To The Beat 12”
Lumberjacks In Hell

After releases on INTERNATIONAL DEEJAY GIGOLOS and CREME ORGANIZATION he drops this 12" on LUMBERJACKS IN HELL featuring two epic cuts: "TO THE BEAT BIZARRE" is a 13 min ode to DANIELLE BALDELLI with TANGERINE DREAM-like synths and "AN INSANE EXPERIMENT" a 10 min acid house jackin' track.

Purchase To The Beat 12” here:




Mo Kolours
EP1: Drum Talking 12”
One Handed Music

Mo Kolours drops into the One Handed roster like Hawk on a half pipe. The rhythms lead the way here, whether the straight, percussive workout of "Drum Talking" or the crafty vocal manipulation that drives the low-slung bump of "Biddies," a song that traces an imaginary line between Theo Parrish and Gonja Sufi. "Dead Of Night" mines the symbolism of The Beatles while his own "Bakiraq" resembles a soul classic. This is a set of deep, spaced-out weed shanties.

Purchase EP1: Drum Talking 12”EP1: Drum Talking 12”


SVENDSEN, BE: Catchy Penny & Cosmos Part 1 12"
WANDLER: La Petite Mort 12"
EXTRAWELT: Vorsprung Durch Hektik 12"
TADEO: Signals 12" D5: Neutrino EP 12"
GARY BECK: Egoist 12"
SECRET CINEMA: Minerals EP2 12"
SECRET CINEMA: Minerals EP3 12”
LIGHTBLUEMOVER (FEAT. BLACK LIGHT SMOKE): Girn & Ddisco 12"
ELOQ: Galactic Neckbreaks EP 12”
VA: Deep Disco & Boogie Vol. 1 (Part 1) 12”
VA: VA IT 2 12" BAREM: Blue 12"
HECTOR: What The Hec? 12”
HEY: Summer Of Seven 3/7 7"
SILVERSHOWER: Early Fever 12"
ALEX NIGGEMAN: Lately 12"
BERMUDA: Ihasama 12"
ZADIG: P8 12"
BICEP: EP2 12"
RUEDE HAGELSTEIN: Who's Me? 12”
DJ YELLOW: Night In Tranzylvania 12"
VA: African Calling Vol. 2 12"
Debukas/DEBUKAS EP 12”
Deep Space Orchestra/LO PAN 12"
Miss Cheesecake/GET OFF THE FLOOR 12”
Mirror People/REACTION - ODYSSEY 12”
Various/THE ART OF ACID PART 2 12”
I-Boat Captain/SLOWER - MOODY BEAT 12”
Jam Factory/ONE NIGHT STAND EP1 12 LENG008
Mountaineer/LOVE POTION-DRUM POTION 12"
Rayko & Em Vee/LUMBERJACKS IN HELL 2 12”
Bop/AMAZING ADVENTURES OF... LP
Commix/DOUBLE DOUBLE 12”
Frank Martiniq/GOLDEN DUSK REMIXES 10”
Jerzzey Boy/LOST CUTS PART 1 12”
Majesty's Pleasure/VOLUME 1 12”
London Elektricity/METEORITES RMX'S 12”
Calibro 35/EUROCRIME! REMIXES EP 12”
William Onyeabor/ANYTHING YOU SOW LP
YSE/DRAWN AT DAWN EP 12”
Various/SCCUCCI ONE 12" EP
Brawther/DO IT YOURSELF EP 12”
W+L Black/DISCO EDITS 12”
Phantom & Hold/GLASS HEART 12”
William Onyeabor/ANYTHING YOU SOW LP
Drop Out Orchestra/OUT TO LUNCH 12”
Ellesse/NEW YORK BOY - TODD TERRY 12”
Ron Basejam/A LIFE IN HEADPHONES EP 12”
Lovebirds/WANT YOU IN MY SOUL 12”
La Tuerie/THE BASEMENT BOUTIQUE EP 12”
Various/MIAMI 2011 SAMPLER 2 12”
Doug Willis/DOUGGY STYLE EP 12"

SOUNDTRACK SERIES #3

Posted by Job O Brother, February 28, 2010 12:35pm | Post a Comment
Directions: Imagine Mr. Brother living another day, as always, with music playing. Whether it’s one of his trusty iPods, or his home stereo, or working the soundtracks section of Amoeba Music Hollywood, Mr. Brother is eating, sonically, with the mouths of his ears.

To simulate this experience, as you read the below story of a day lived, you will be given certain music clips to play. These are inserted to provide you with the same tunes Job was hearing as he was doing what you’ll be reading.

For example, while he was writing the above directions, he was listening to this:

The other day, while I was counting my number collection, I was interrupted by a knock on my front door. As is customary in my country, I went to see who it was. Imagine my surprise when it turned out to be none other than myself.

“Oh!” I said with a start, “How did you get out there?”

“You mean,” I said with a sly grin, “How did you get out here.”

“That’s exactly what I said,” I retorted.

“But not what you meant,” I corrected.

I slammed the door in my face and went back to my numbers. I don’t have to take that kind of snarkiness, you know – not even from myself.


Hours later I was eating some broccoli that the Lord My God made, when a second knock came – this time at the back door. Worried that I was up to my own tricks and hoping to avoid another awkward confrontation with myself, I peaked out the kitchen window to see who it was.

To my delight, it was filmmaker and performance artist, Miranda July. Most people know her from her critically acclaimed debut feature Me and You and Everyone We Know. What they may not realize is they can also find some of her albums at Amoeba Music, as I have. While not the best music to play at parties (unless you exclusively party with Yoko Ono), Miranda July’s albums are certainly an adventure, and one is never sure what will happen. They’re almost like listening to old radio dramas while peaking on purple micro-dots. (That’s a good thing.)


I quickly combed my hair and opened the back door.

“Hello, Miranda July,” I greeted, trying not to appear too excited. But then I threw-up, because I was too excited. And then I was so shocked that I’d vomited that I peed my pants, but as all this happened I pretended to be sneezing, hoping she wouldn’t catch on. I mean, a sneezing fit is embarrassing, but less so than excreting every juice the bowels have to offer from both ends of my shivering body.

“I don’t know who you think you’re fooling,” snarled Miranda July, “Unless it’s yourself!”

The full meaning of her admonishment didn’t reveal itself until she removed her latex mask and feminine attire, at which point I discovered it wasn’t Miranda July at all, but myself in disguise.

“How did you manage to find such stylish clothes in your size?” I asked, trying to appear unperturbed (which I was, of course, and very!).

“Easy,” I answered, “I had them custom made by a fantastically famous fashion designer whose name escapes me. He’s done all the great women of rock – from Polly Jean Harvey to Muslimgauze.”


“I’m pretty sure Muslimgauze isn’t considered a ‘great woman of rock’,” I corrected, popping eight pieces of gum in my mouth, the scent of which had suffered from my retching. “Anyway,” I continued, slurring for the chewy gob now lodged in my mouth, “How did you afford that? I barely have any money.”

“True,” I sighed, “That part was difficult. I’m afraid you’re gonna be receiving some disturbing letters from various credit card companies. Also, you should get tested immediately.”

I didn’t know what I was implying, but I knew I didn’t like it. I slammed the door in my face and returned to my broccoli, which was, by now, cold. This made me sad, and I wept over my plate; tears drenched the broccoli and made it salty, which made matters worse, as they’d already been perfectly seasoned with Bragg’s Liquid Aminos. Now it was too salty.

There was nothing to be done. I would have to prepare more broccoli. Thankfully, God made more. I put on some Annette Funicello records and set to cooking.


Most people know Annette Funicello from her critically acclaimed debut on the Mickey Mouse Club. What they may not realize is they can also find some of her albums at Amoeba Music, as I have. While not the best music to play while making sweet love (unless you exclusively have sex with Yoko Ono), Annette Funicello’s albums are certainly a delight, and one is never sure what will happen if you listen to them while locked in a cage full of tigers and monkeys.

Night came, and I put on my pajamas and brushed my teeth, making sure to use my tooth brush and not the more unwieldy chainsaw that had caused me so many dental problems in the past.


As I was pondering the magical properties of fluoride, I heard a rapping on my bathroom window. I left the underwater dungeon (where I always care for my hygiene) and went upstairs to the bathroom, only to find myself precariously balanced on the window ledge, grinning madly and looking disheveled.

I gesticulated for me to open the window, but I was hesitant. So far, every conversation I’d had with myself that day had been annoying and in some cases disturbing, and I wasn’t sure I wanted to hear anything more from myself, especially just before bedtime.

Against my better judgment, but worried after all that I was trapped outside, I opened the window.

“How did you get out there?” I asked.

“You mean, how did you get out here?”

I was already wishing I hadn’t opened the window.

“Well come inside, in any case.”

I tumbled onto the bathroom floor, giggling.

“Are you drunk?” I asked, furrowing my brow.

“No,” I answered, “I just remembered how funny floors are.”

I didn’t respond, because I didn’t understand what was funny about floors, and also because I felt that I was only saying things for the sake of themselves – a pretense.

Me and I went to bed, and while I’d been unhappy with my behavior, it was nice to have someone to curl up with.

“Would you like me to sing you a lullaby?” I asked.

“Why yes,” I answered, surprised at such a lovely thought.

I cleared my voice and snuggled close, and this is what I sang:


By the time I finished, I was fast asleep, dreaming that I was at a sex party with Yoko Ono. It was nice, and it only goes to show that for all the trouble I cause myself, at heart I really am supposed to pay my rent today.

The end.
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