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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Touché Amoré

Posted by Amoebite, July 16, 2019 04:09pm | Post a Comment

Touche Amore - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We had a fun time talking to Jeremy Bolm, vocalist of the post-hardcore band Touché Amoré, for our latest What's In My Bag? episode. A longtime Amoeba Hollywood customer and avid vinyl collector, Bolm picked up albums by Shudder To Think, Thom Yorke, and Townes Van Zandt, and talked about how there's no wrong time to start listening to a new genre of music.

"Full disclosure: I am a 100-percent jazz poser," he confessed to us. "I'm in my mid-30s, and it was last year when I had the moment where I was like, 'I think I have the attention span for jazz now.'" Bolm recounted the amusing and somewhat frustrating moment when jazz finally clicked for him and the resulting decision to buy one new jazz album each month and give it his singular attention. 

LA post-hardcore band Touché Amoré consists of Jeremy Bolm (vocals), Tyler Kirby (bass), Elliot Babin (percussion), Clayton Stevens (guitar), and Nick Steinhardt (guitar). The band formed in 2007 and recorded their debut full-length album, ...To the Beat of a Dead Horse, in 2009. Two years later, the group journeyed to Eudora, KS to record their sophomore album, Parting the Sea Between Brightness and Me, with engineer/producer Ed Rose (The Get Up Kids, The Appleseed Cast, Motion City Soundtrack). The band embarked on a European tour with La Dispute in support of the LP in 2011. They spent 2012 on the road, touring with both Circa Survive and Converge.

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10 Underrated Albums Released in 2015

Posted by Billy Gil, December 21, 2015 05:15pm | Post a Comment

As everyone’s been putting out their top 50 of 2015 lists (including us), there are a few great albums that have been curiously missing. Here are a few albums that should have gotten more love than they did and are worth checking out.

Busdriver Thumbs

L.A.-based rapper Busdriver has never really gotten his due. His latest mixtape and follow-up to 2014’s Perfect Hair has spacey, esoteric beatwork, but Busdriver is never less than engaged—his rhymes on “Hyperbolic 2” and “Much” shake you by the shoulders and rouse you from a daze. Appearances by Anderson .Paak, Jeremiah Jae and Del tha Funkee Homosapien keep things interesting. Hopefully we’ll see a physical release of Thumbs in 2016.

 

Cold BeatInto the Air

Hanna Lew’s Cold Beat grew hookier and more ferocious on their second album, drawing inspiration from coldwave and Blondie for an enjoyably jagged post-punk ride.

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Album Picks: Jamie xx, Girlpool, Sun Kil Moon, ASAP Rocky, Froth

Posted by Billy Gil, June 2, 2015 09:39am | Post a Comment

Jamie xxIn Colour

Producer and member of The xx Jamie Smith has finallly released his debut LP, and it feels like a game-changer. Favoring melody and atmosphere over showy beatwork, In Colour is able to wrangle a wide variety of sounds into a living, breathing whole. Tracks like “Gosh” layer found sounds and field recordings underneath appealing synth lines. Mellower tracks like “Sleep Sound” and “SeeSaw” are terrific after-hours jams, like passing out outside a rave and letting the beats pulse through your dreams. The xx member Oliver Sim shows up to lend his narcotic vocals to the noirish “Stranger in a Room,” while fellow xx singer Romy Madley Croft smears black mascara all over the heartbreak beat of “Loud Places,” which makes wonderful use of a sample of Idris Muhammad’s “Could Heaven Ever Be Like This” on the song’s rousing chorus. Though it’s a bit jarring to hear rapper Young Thug and dancehall artist Popcaan on the following track, “I Know There’s Gonna Be (Good Times),” the song itself is a worthy hip-hop crossover that enlivens the album as a whole. It may sound cheesy, but In Colour really does prove that trip-hop, post-punk, house and hip-hop can call reside under the same roof, as Smith expertly strings these sounds together into new nocturnal anthems. It’s not too soon to call this a new electronic masterwork.

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Amoeba's Top 50 Favorite Albums of 2014

Posted by Billy Gil, December 29, 2014 04:24pm | Post a Comment



All we do at Amoeba is listen to music and talk about music. Take advantage of how nerdy we are with this comprehensive best-of list from the year, which compiles new records from the best albums of 2014 lists made by Aaron Detroit, Brad Schelden, Oliver/Matt/Jordan, Billyjam and myself (click to see invidividual lists).

 

1. FKA TwigsLP1

FKA Twigs LP1 was one of those cross-genre, unclassifiable albums that everyone seemed to love. Not only the best debut record of the year, perhaps the best, period.

“There is miles of ink about Ms. Twigs already, and for good reason – her debut album, LP1, wlessly melds a bonkers electronic experimentalism with mainstream R&B and pop with spellbinding results.” —Aaron

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PST's 50 Best Albums of 2014

Posted by Billy Gil, December 5, 2014 02:48pm | Post a Comment

This is how it always works: You think, how am I going to find 50 albums I really liked this year? Then by the end of compiling these things, you’re leaving off records you really liked and realizing that this year didn’t suck so badly after all! Here are the 50 albums I honestly felt were the most well-made, original or enjoyable this year. Check out Aaron Detroit’s list, too, for even more good shit from 2014.

 

1. Sun Kil MoonBenji

Amid the wrongheaded War on Drugs bashing and indulgent songwriting/self-mythologizing that came with it, it could be easy to forget the brilliance of Benji. But Mark Kozelek’s later-career renaissance reaches its apex on Benji. Whereas songs in his ’90s project Red House Painters were often autobiographical, if morose and romantic, if, to call Benji “confessional” would be an understatement. Not only is it a classic example oversharing in the social media age, it’s just a new classic period, the best thing he’s done since RHP’s heyday. Two songs directly address Kozelek’s love for his aging parents as he himself hits middle age (“I Can’t Live Without My Mother’s Love” and “I Love My Dad” are far from ironic, though they cover ground beyond what their titles suggest). “Dogs” covers Kozelek’s history with women in sometimes excruciating detail, from his first kiss at 5 to getting bathed by two women. Part of what makes Benji so masterful is how Kozelek blends rich physical details, with references to Panera Bread and Pink Floyd records, along with impressionistic accounts, such as his atmospheric telling of what caught his attention in a Led Zeppelin film (“I Watched the Film the Song Remains the Same”) and what that says about him as a person. It can be a lot to take in at once—“Micheline” at first feels like a diary dump, though it ends on a touching note about his grandmother—but most of the time, the details are funny or poignant or both, coming through clearly with little more than Kozelek’s wavering, creaking voice and reverbed acoustic guitar. “Ben’s My Friend,” which ends the album with its catchiest song (and curiosity value, due to its titular subject being Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie), is a sterling reminder of how many little things add up to the sum of our lives, making a pretty refrain out of “blue crab cakes,” throwing in some horns and flamenco guitar for good measure and tying the album up nicely with a reflective bow. Kozelek may be a cranky old man, but his lifetime of experiences made for enrapturing listening on Benji, which simply has the best songwriting of any music release this year.

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