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Hear Sufjan Stevens' Planetarium Project...at a Planetarium in Los Angeles

Posted by Amoebite, June 1, 2017 04:50pm | Post a Comment

Planetarium

Space is the place for the men of Planetarium. The new indie "supergroup" consists of Sufjan Stevens, The National's Bryce Dessner, Nico Muhly, and James McAlister and their debut self-titled release is due June 9th via 4AD. Taking their inspiration from our marvelous solar system, the songs on Planetarium are all named after different planets, the moon, the sun, a comet, and black holes.

4AD and Amoeba Hollywood are excited to launch (get it?) a very special Planetarium listening event in the Los Angeles area on June 7th, taking place at the John Drescher Planetarium at Santa Monica College. (Similar events are occurring in Seattle and New York City.) To hear the album in this incredible setting, all you have to do is pre-order Planetarium on CD or vinyl in-store only at Amoeba Hollywood starting Monday, June 5th. Fans will receive guaranteed entry into the 6:15pm seating.

Limit one admission per CD/LP purchased, limit two per person.

Planetarium albumWhat: Planetarium Listening Event

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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Young The Giant

Posted by Amoebite, January 23, 2017 06:56pm | Post a Comment

Young The Giant What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We were stoked to have Orange County indie rockers Young The Giant perform a special live set at Amoeba Hollywood recently in celebration of their new album, Home of the Strange. The quintet went record shopping before the show and we got a chance to check out their cool picks which included some of their old favorites, as well as some new ones. "This is something that I recently stumbled upon, even though it's from, like, the late '80s," says lead singer Sameer Gadhia, referring to Talk Talk. Gadhia picked up two reissue LPs from the band - Laughing Stock and Spirit Of Eden - whose similar tones and characteristics he compares to Radiohead's Kid A and Amnesiac albums.

Young The Giant Home Of The Strange Originally known as The Jakes, Young The Giant was founded in Irvine, CA by a group of longtime friends. The current lineup of Sameer Gadhia, Jacob Tilley, Eric Cannata, Payam Doostzadeh, and Francois Comtois crystallized in 2010; the band spent that year finishing up their self-titled debut with legendary producer Joe Chiccarelli (Morrissey, The Strokes, Frank Zappa) at Sunset Sound Studios in LA. The album's first single, "My Body," peaked at number five on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart and led to an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live!.

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Outside Lands 2016 Lineup Announced...by Muppets!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, April 5, 2016 02:27pm | Post a Comment

The Muppets' Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem

The Outside Lands Music & Arts Festival
returns to San Francisco's Golden Gate Park August 5-7 with scores of diverse musical acts, comedians, visual artists, and more food, beer, and vendors than you can shake a corn dog at. And now add to that roster of attractions The Muppets' own rock and roll legends, Dr. Teeth and the Electric Mayhem, in what is their "first-ever live festival performance."

Just today, the lineup was announced by these far-out puppets in an amazing video, revealing their festival mates Radiohead, Lana Del Rey, Sufjan Stevens, LCD Soundsystem, Grimes, Duran Duran, Chance the Rapper, Beach House, Vince Staples, Lionel Richie, Peaches, Kamasi Washington, and many, many more.

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Amoeba Hollywood's Top 50 Sellers of 2015

Posted by Amoebite, January 6, 2016 02:33pm | Post a Comment

amoeba hollywood best sellers of 2015

Amoeba Hollywood shoppers had diverse tastes in 2015, snapping up popular albums by Adele, Lana Del Rey and Taylor Swift as well as critical favorites by Sufjan Stevens, Kamasi Washington and Beach House in equal measure, plus those essential records that never go out of style. Check out the year's top sellers below.

1.  Tame ImpalaCurrents

tame impala currents lpTame Impala's third album was a critical and commercial triumph. It's both as a fascinating headphones album for production junkies and as a set of immaculate psych-pop songs that feels endlessly giving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.  Adele25

adele 25 lpAdele's third album was a across-the-board hit with people of all ages. With pipes like Aretha and insightful lyrics, she’s our premiere pop chronicler of relationships and breakups.

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Album Picks: Sufjan Stevens, Lower Dens, Death Grips, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, The Soft Moon, Male Gaze

Posted by Billy Gil, March 31, 2015 11:30am | Post a Comment

Sufjan Stevens - Carrie & Lowell

sufjan stevens carrie lowell lp“Death With Dignity” opens Carrie & Lowell as a touching elegy to Sufjan Stevens’ mother, yet it also could describe his relationship to his own music. “I don’t know where to begin,” he sings, and “I’ve got nothing to prove” over a familiar bed of bluegrass-inspired folk. Stevens was like the A-plus student of indie pop, turning out album after album of perfectly manicured orchestral folk-pop, but I felt like he lost his way a bit with The BQE, an album and project that felt unwieldy, as well the hectic electro-folk of The Age of Adz. Carrie & Lowell, by comparison, is one of his most stripped-down albums to date. That’s not to say it doesn’t have his trademark fixation on detail— songs shift halfway through, like “Should Have Known Better’s” turn into stuttering, laptoppy acoustics and choral touches, or “Drawn to the Blood’s” extended string finale; “you checked your text while I masturbated,” he sings casually, telling a girl she looks like Poseidon in the sexually turbulent “All of Me Wants All of You.” Lyrically and musically, Stevens remains a curious tinkerer, but Carrie & Lowell never feels busy in the slightest. It’s an intensely focused work, one that places Stevens’ voice and songcraft over bells and whistles. Whereas locations and history seemed to hold Stevens’ interest in the past, here he’s death-obsessed (and still spiritual as ever). “Fourth of July” feels romantically morbid and carries the happy refrain “we’re all gonna die,” and on “The Only Thing,” he sounds stricken with grief to the point of barely being able to keep going on. Stevens’ way with language, drawing on mythology and Christian imagery, and ascendant voice keeps the songs from wallowing too deeply, even as they describe an immense sense of loss, allowing those moments when he does break—“No Shade in the Shadow of the Cross’” “Fuck me, I’m falling apart”—to land all the more effectively. Without the filter of a state’s history or the heavy religiosity of Seven Swans, Carrie & Lowell finds Stevens turning his studious eye inward to fully explore his own grief, and the results are never short of breathtaking.

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