Amoeblog

Rest In Peace Bushwick Bill - Dead at age 52

Posted by Billyjam, June 9, 2019 11:45pm | Post a Comment


After widely publicized erroneous reports by numerous news outlets earlier today (Sunday June 9th) that Bushwick Bill had died, that were soonafter followed up with  correction notices that the Geto Boys  member diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, was in fact still alive but “fighting for his life,” tonight at 8:35pm (Pacific) official word was released that Bushwick Bill had indeed died.  In February this year, around the time he was about to go on tour, it was announced that the artist was suffering from stage 4 pancreatic cancer, while reportedly he had been ill from cancer since early last year.

Confirmed to The Associated Press tonight by his publicist Dawn P, the 52 year old rap artist born Richard Shaw died in a Colorado hospital at 9:35pm local Mountain Standard Time where he was surrounded by family.
Known for his recordings with the Geto Boys (with whom he first began as a dancer known by the name Little Billy) as well as his solo work,
pictured right is his hit rap single "Ever So Clear" while above is the cover of Bushwick Bill’s album Little Big Man Chopped & Screwed that  is one of many featuring the artist available from Amoeba. Others include the Geto Boys'  Foundation,, Geto Boys LP vinyl, Best of the Geto Boys,  and Da Good, Da Bad & Da Ugly.

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Dirty Roots: Southern Hip-Hop Part I -- The 12" Era (1979-1983)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 16, 2015 07:21pm | Post a Comment

As far as my ears can tell, pretty near every rapper from Inglewood to Plumstead nowadays owes more than a little something to the rise of the Dirty South sound that pretty much took over hip-hop in the late 1990s. As anyone with more than a passing familiarity with the genre knows, however, southern hip-hop was for many years primarily a regional concern. In the 1970s the hip-hop scene was firmly centered in the Northeast. In the early 1980s it made its way to the West Coast but as far as mainstream audiences were concerned, skipped the third and fourth coasts. In the 1990s, many casual fans and scholars alike will tell you, there was a war between the East and West Coasts during some Southern upstarts crashed the party and, despite the efforts of the backpack Taliban, restored a sense of fun to a genre which had increasingly grown joyless and conservative. 

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