Amoeblog

The Late Phil Lynott Further Ups His Iconic Status with Dublin Exhibition Dedicated to the Thin Lizzy Legend

Posted by Billyjam, May 11, 2011 11:43am | Post a Comment

At any given time, diehard Phil Lynott fans can find good reason to visit Dublin, Ireland -- but recently the incentive to visit the late great Thin Lizzy singer's hometown has increased greatly due to the ongoing Philip Lynott Exhibition, an impressive, large scale and reverential expo dedicated to the iconic Irish rock figure.

Since his premature death 25 years ago Lizzy fanatics (and there are many) have been making pilgrimages to Lynott's grave in Saint Fintan’s Cemetery in Sutton (8 miles north of Dublin City centre on the Howth Peninsula) and placing flowers and sundry Thin Lizzy memorabilia by the singer's headstone which, fittingly, is designed by Irish artist Jim Fitzpatrick, whose traditional Celtic designs graced the covers of many Lizzy records such as Vagabonds of the Western World and Johnny The Fox.

Another major attraction in Dublin for Lynott/Lizzy fans is the life size bronze statue (above with temporary Amoeba sticker) of Lynott leaning on his guitar outside outside Bruxelles pub on Harry Street just off Grafton Street -- a high foot traffic Dublin city centre thoroughfare. Since it was erected six years ago the statue's draw has matched that of monuments and statues dedicated to key Irish historical figures. Similarly, Phil Lynott's figure at the Dublin Waxwork Museum is one of its most popular attractions. But it is the ongoing exhibit, which runs through next month, that has been the most rewarding shrine of all for the legions of visiting Lizzy/Lynott fanatics.

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OMG! Look What the Cat Dragged In!

Posted by Kells, January 26, 2011 01:08am | Post a Comment
I don't know about you but when I was thirteen years old this is what I thought rock 'n' roll looked like:
Hardly petal fresh but definitely party pretty! Poison celebrates their 25th anniversary this year and rumor mills are a-spinnin' that Bret Michaels is intent on putting together a commemorative tour with a reluctant Mötley Crüe who, at 30 years of "togetherness," accuse Michaels of "trying to will" the bill into being. And why not? It's a dreamy match up of iconic glam-rockery and bitchy cocksureness the likes of which RuPaul's Drag Race can only boast, and don't we know Ru can put on a show! But I digress..

Even if the Crüe doesn't fit, I hope Poison still moves ahead with their tour and, if they have any imagination what-so-ever as to what their audience of once-thirteen-year-old girlies want, they had better play right through all thirty-eight glorious minutes of their recently reissued (on 180 gram vinyl housed in deluxe gatefold, no less) debut LP Look What the Cat Dragged In. The record once described by Michaels as a "glorifed demo" spawned four singles (and, after almost a year of climbing, peaked at #3 on the Billboard charts in 1987, how lucky! Like Mötley Crüe, Poison originally formed under a crap name (Paris; in Mötley Crüe's case, Christmas) and changed it to a lesser crap name after moving from Pennsylvania to Hollywood, where they met their future ("reality") star guitarist, Brooklyn native C.C. DeVille (who apparently won out over Slash in auditions due to personal preferences concerning wardrobe; you know, stilettos over moccasins). Though possibly best known for the sleazy, erectual frustration of songs like "Talk Dirty To Me," "I Want Action" and "Want Some, Need Some," not forgetting the corny "I Won't Forget You" slow jam, Look What the Cat Dragged In serves up more than just a teased tumbleweed of ambition which, given their swift success, surely pissed off a lot of the competition. To revisit Ru, I believe this record to be a portrait of the charisma, uniqueness, nerve and talent a certain kind of musician had to harness --- however desperate, ripped-off or closeted --- in their quest to make a name for themselves in the unforgiving 1980's Hollywood rock scene, namely "glam." The video for Poison's debut single from Look What the Cat Dragged In, "Cry Tough," is a slice of Hollywood glam zeigeist unparalleled in every aspect -- check it out (p.s. did these guys love Van Halen or what?!):
 

"Baby Please Don't Go" Has Remained Popular with Artists Over the 75 Years Since It Was Written By Big Joe Williams

Posted by Billyjam, May 27, 2010 06:51am | Post a Comment
Big Joe Williams "Baby Please Don't Go"

Written, recorded, and released back in 1935 by the great delta blues musician and songwriter Big Joe Williams, the sBig Joe Williamsong "Baby Please Don't Go" has been popular with countless artists in the seventy five years since, having been covered by dozens upon dozens of different musicians to the point that it ranks among the top ten most recorded blues songs in music's history. 

Perhaps the most famous or recognizable cover version of "Baby Please Don't Go" is the 1964 recording/release by Them -- the Belfast, Northern Ireland blues-rock ensemble featuring Van Morrison. Them's cover (with "Gloria" on the B side), which was a top ten single in the UK in 1965 and a US AOR radio staple in consequent years, injected a whole rock n roll energy into the classic blues song. 

themSo influential was Van & co's version that nearly all of the versions of the song recorded or just played after 1965 (including by fellow Irish blues-rockers Taste featuring Rory Gallagher) are rock inflected covers a la Them rather than the original blues version by Williams. Another Irish rocker to cover the song was guitarist / vocalist Eric Bell, who was an original member of Thin Lizzy. 

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The scene in need of a name

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 14, 2009 06:39pm | Post a Comment
 

About ten years ago, my friend Pete Jourdan and I were trying to advance the awareness of what we felt was a scene that was somehow unrecognized both for its existence as a scene and for the Godlike Genius of it all. I described it thusly, "Although there’s never been a name put to it, there’s an ongoing movement in music whose participants mix musical influences like the baritone atmospherics of Lee Hazelwood, the Doors, Scott Walker and Leonard Cohen with Ennio Morricone, Hank Williams, and Southern Gothic and Poetic Realist literary influences to create a sort of rural, post-apocalyptic, midnight cabaret music that, whilst dark and doomy, offers a sepia-tinted alternative to the embarassing cornballisms of Goth. A lot of the bands hail from Australia and their members normally look like a mix of consumptive prospectors and bourbon-drunk undertakers. Their lush, decadent sound is usually built around haunting violins, spaghetti western guitar and old time religion."

 

Windswept, Australian, Hillbilly Heathcliffs

It was the CD era, pre-blogs, and eventually we, like Israel and Palestine, couldn't come to an agreement either on what to call it or how to characterize it. Pete maintained that Nick Cave was the central figure. Given that Boys Next Door inarguably sucked while the similarly minded Young Charlatans and Crime + the City Solution were already good, I didn't want to overemphasize Nick Cave's importance at the expense of Rowland S. Howard, Simon Bonney, Mick Harvey and others. If everything had to tie directly to Nick Cave, how could we incorporate bands like Wolfgang Press and Tindersticks but through at least three degrees of separation? Nick Cave became our "right of return" and talks broke down. I don't know whether this biography is auto or not, but in order to preserve it:

Peter D. Jourdan, plagued with weak health, was begged by his family physician, Old Man Olafson (who runs Olafson’s General Store in West Lakeland Township), to harden himself and his constitution by way of spending a length of time on in the masculine arts of ranching and trail-riding in our wonderful frontier... but only after his prescription of horehound (oral) failed. Instead, however, it seems he fell in with the notorious Rowena gang and his health and moral reserve were subsequently eroded completely.



And Also the Trees


Anita Lane


Angelo Badalamenti


Asphalt Ribbons


Birthday Party


Blackeyed Susans


Kid Congo Powers


Crime + the City Solution


The Dirty Three


The Flaming Stars


Gallon Drunk


Hugo Race & the True Spirit


Mick Harvey

Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds

Phil Shoenfelt & Southern Cross

PJ Harvey

Rowland S. Howard

Simon Bonney

Veuillez installer Flash Player pour lire la vidéo
Sixteen Horsepower


These Immortal Souls


The Tindersticks


The Triffids


The Walkabouts


Wolfgang Press


Young Charlatans

Also check out Conway Savage, The Denver Gentlemen, Die Haut, Fatal Shore, The Gilded Bats, Honeymoon In Red, Hungry Ghosts, Once Upon a Time, Shotgun Wedding, Those Poor Bastards and Woven Hand, which have no decent video footage currently.

Become a fan of Eric's Blog on Facebook!

Happy Missouri Day! - Yup, It's aready been a yurr since the last'n

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 15, 2008 12:42am | Post a Comment
MISSOURI DAY

The 3rd Wednesday of the October, this year the 15th.


Pendersleigh & Sons' Official Map of Missouri


In my experience, when you'ins tell people you’re from Missouri, most people reply self-satisfiedly with "don't you mean Missouruh?" or, alternately, "where is Missouri? I don’t think I’ve ever been there."

Whether Missouri is Lower Midwestern or Upper Southern (or the Border South or, the Upland South, or less commonly today, the Yeoman South) is a somewhat common debate amongst Missourians... at least on the internet.

In my experience, Missouri's Midwestern neighbors, centered along the Great Lakes, (haters) tend to disparage Mighty Mo as a hick state whurr test scores are low, the accent is ugly and you'ins can buy fireworks, liquor and ammo... all in the same place.

Missouri's neighbors in the Deep South (also haters) usually don't consider it to be Southern because Missouri didn't side with the South in the Civil War (well, that's complicated-- thurr were 30,000 gray and 109,000 blue) and because South Coasters love to equate the entire South with just the Deep South aka the Lower South aka the Plantation South.

As far as Southern credentials go, Mark Twain, Langston Hughes, Thomas Hart Benton all seem fairly Southern, do they not? On the other hand, natives like T.S. Elliot, William Burroughs and Maya Angelou don’t so much, huh? Cultural cringe I reckon, plays a part in this confusion, as do geographical overlap and historical shifts.


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