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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Mike Shinoda (Linkin Park)

Posted by Amoebite, October 8, 2018 06:20pm | Post a Comment

Mike Shinoda - What's In My Bag?

Before Mike Shinoda's in-store performance at Amoeba Hollywood, we sat down with the Linkin Park founding member to talk about some of his favorite records, including a bunch of independent DJ LPs he was excited to find at the store. "When we were getting started as a band, our DJ, Joe, and I used to go down to Melrose and find all these independent records," he told us waxing nostalgic, going on to explain how DJs like Q-bert and DJ Swamp pushed the envelope and inspired him and his band mate. Shinoda had a lot of insight into all of his record picks, making for a sincere and enlightening What's In My Bag?

Mike Shinoda co-founded Linkin Park in 1996, serving as the band's rhythm guitarist, main songwriter, keyboardist, producer, and lead vocalist. Together with guitarist Brad Delson, Shinoda engineered and Mike Shinoda - Post Traumatic - Amoeba Musicproduced the band's 1999 Hybrid Theory EP, a teaser of sorts for their groundbreaking full-length of the same name. Linkin Park's second LP, Meteora (2003), and third LP, Minutes to Midnight (2007) were also smash hits for the band, with both albums debuting at #1 on the Billboard Top 200. The band has steadily climbed over the course of its twenty-plus-year career, with A Thousand Suns (2010), Living Things (2012), The Hunting Party (2014), and One More Light (2017) all doing brisk business on the charts. Linkin Park has won two Grammy awards, for the track "Crawling" (Hybrid Theory) and "Numb/Encore," from their 2004 collaboration with Jay-Z, Collision Course.

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Public Enemy's "It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back" Remains A True Classic 30 Years After Its June 28th 1988 Def Jam Release

Posted by Billyjam, June 28, 2018 04:03pm | Post a Comment
"From a rebel it's final on black vinyl. Soul, rock and roll comin' like a rhino. Tables turn, suckers burn to learn. They can't disable the power of my label, Def Jam tells you who I am: The Enemy's Public - They really give a damn"  - Chuck D ("Rebel WIthout A Pause")
On June 28th, 1988  Public Enemy released their iconic second album It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back (reissued many times since including on new pressing LP/vinyl, CD Deluxe version, and 2 cassette set). Now exactly thirty years later listening back to this pitch perfect production and lyrical masterpiece, it's instantly clear that not only was Nation the pioneering political hip-hop group's best album of their three-plus decade career but one of the powerfully engaging albums of hip-hop and any other genre; a true modern American music classic.

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Amoeba Berkeley's "Checking the Technique" Panelists Brian Coleman, DJ Platurn, Domino, Adisa Banjoko & Eric Arnold Share Picks

Posted by Billyjam, July 19, 2017 08:12pm | Post a Comment

Author of the acclaimed hip-hop album guide Check The Technique two-volume book series Brian Coleman will be at Amoeba Berkeley tomorrow, Thursday July 20th at 530pm (free and all ages), when the Boston based hip-hop ambassador will oversee an anticipated panel discussion plus record spinning session fittingly entitled "Checking The Technique." Joining Coleman for an evening of what promises to "celebrate old-school hip-hop, especially focusing on rap’s “Golden Age” with an emphasis on Bay Area and California artists" will be former Amoeba Berkeley staffer DJ Platurn (45 Sessions/Oakland Faders), Adisa Banjoko (Hip Hop Chess Federation & author of Bobby, Bruce & The Bronx), Eric Arnold (Oakulture), Domino (Hieroglyphics), and Prozack Turner (Foreign Legion/The Legionnaire Saloon). In addition to spinning select vinyl and discussing some of their favorite hip-hop records these panelists (comprised of DJs, artists, and historians) will talk about the importance of both documenting hip-hop's history as well as always been attentive to new upcoming hip-hop artists and musical trends.

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From "Give Peace A Chance" to "Fuck Donald Trump" - Top Ten Protest Songs

Posted by Billyjam, April 11, 2017 02:10pm | Post a Comment

 
"War, what is it good for? Absolutely nothing! Say it again" - Edwin Starr "War" (1970 Motown) *
The above sentiment of Edwin Starr's popular anti-Vietnam protest song was right about war but with one key exception. War, along with other periods of serious social unrest, historically trigger some of the best reactionary art of all schools including music and some of the most powerful protest songs. Even before last Thursday's bombing of Syria and the inevitable future fallout it will cause, the Trump era had already helped kick start the latest renaissance of revolutionary protest music.  Like Edwin Starr's Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong penned 1970 single, recorded during the counterculture era, the latest wave of protest music is a form of artistic expression born out of passion and necessity. Traditionally protest music acts on two primary levels. It's the soundtrack to the actual protest / rebellion / revolution, as well as being as a medium to vent and share feelings of discontent. As well as being a catharsis for its creators offering listeners some sense of relief or bonding, good protest music can also provide a message of hope during historically challenging times. Since the beginning of time history has a habit of repeatedly presenting its citizens challenging times, with war and social injustices being recurring themes.

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Give The Drummer Some Love: Saluting The Late Great Funky Drummer Clyde Stubblefield by Listing Samples

Posted by Billyjam, February 21, 2017 06:01pm | Post a Comment

Over the weekend one of modern music's most unsung heroes died. The influential soul/funk percussionist Clyde Stubblefield passed on February 18th at age 73 from a kidney failure. Stubblefield's death followed a decade long illness according to his wife who confirmed the musician's passing on Saturday.  As the drummer with James Brown's ensemble during the godfather of funk's highly important decades of the sixties and seventies Stubblefield was responsible for creating and recording numerous highly recognizable funky drumming JB parts including what would become one of the most widely sampled drum breaks in hip-hop history: the short but instantly recognizable drum solo on James Brown's 1970 "Funky Drummer."  The Chattanooga, Tennessee- born percussionist was a member of Brown's band during some of the most exciting years and, as such, he was responsible for the drumming on such classics as "Cold Sweat," "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud," "There Was A Time," "I Got The Feelin'," "Mother Popcorn," and "Ain't It Funky Now." But it was Stubblefield's simple but short [only 20 seconds] funky and hypnotic drum pattern on the James Brown track "Funky Drummer" that would become the artist's grePublic Enemyatest legacy, even though he didn't initially get the full credit for it: both on paper (artist credits) or in paper (money/royalties).
Stubblefied's drumming recording of the song, which would go on to become the most sampled tracks in hip-hop music, is estimated to have been sampled approximately a thousand times!

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