Amoeblog

The Acid Test New Year's Eve Freak Out in San Francisco

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 10, 2017 06:28pm | Post a Comment
The Acid Test
The Acid Test with Silver Apples. Photo by Tyler Loring.

Experience the last trip of the year! A psychedelic happening featuring far-out lights and sounds! Amoeba The Acid Test New Years Eveis proud to sponsor The Acid Test's New Year's Eve Freak Out party on Sunday, December 31st at the Elbo Room with live sets from LA's psych phenom The Creation Factory and local loves The Pop Club Group. The night's DJs include The Acid Test's Steve and Noemi, San Fran's Jodie Artichoke, and Los Angeles DJs Maicol (Heavy Jelly Club) and Peri Alexandra Levin. Visuals to be provided by The Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show.

Following in the tradition of San Francisco's 1960s psychedelic underground, The Acid Test throws mind-expanding freak-out parties featuring incredible live music, DJs spinning obscure psychedelic sounds, and groovy live liquid light show performances. This New Years Eve party is destined to be a happening of epic proportions.

The Creation Factory channels the sounds of 1960s psychedelic beats. The LA-based five-piece isn't just making music they're "capturing the sort of sounds that people don’t hear anymore," says front man Shane Stots. They are creating an experience. "We're bringing sounds back from the grave, maybe better than they were before," Stots, who's also a member of L.A. rock group the Mystic Braves, says. The group uses authentic 1960s gear (and an era-appropriate look) to create blues-inflected rock designed to get a crowd's feet moving. The Creation Factory was formed in 2014 when Stots pieced together a style-infused gang of psychedelic bandits, including band members Iggy Gonzalez (also of the Mystic Braves) on drums, Neil Soiland and Gabriel Pacheco on guitar, and Peter Maffei (of The Electric Magpie) on keyboards. Stots himself provides bass and lead vocals.

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The Mad Alchemy Trip 2017 West Coast Tour

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, July 4, 2017 03:15pm | Post a Comment

Mad Alchemy Trip Tour 2017

LSD and the Search for God
LSD and the Search for God
Jesus Sons
Jesus Sons
The Asteroid No. 4
The Asteroid No. 4

Commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the Summer of Love with one of San Francisco's original trip-inducers! Amoeba Music is proud to sponsor the 2017 Mad Alchemy Trip tour, which will hit major cities and groovy clubs along the West Coast July 12 - July 22nd. Fantastic psych-inspired bands The Asteroid No. 4, LSD and the Search for God, The Stevenson Ranch Davidians, Jesus Sons, Dream Phases, Creatures Choir, and Family of Light Band will be accompanied by the mesmerizing projection work of the Mad Alchemy Liquid Light Show, making for a sensory experience that cannot be missed.

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One album wonders: The Glove's Blue Sunshine

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 1, 2015 12:24am | Post a Comment
 THE GLOVE - BLUE SUNSHINE (recorded 1982, released 1983) 



For about 40 years The Cure have been the main creative outlet for Robert Smith but he's engaged in the occasional side project here and there (and there). Whilst not as obscure as Cogasm or Cult Hero, The Glove and their sole album, Blue Sunshine, is a one album wonder that deserves better. 


I suppose that The Glove were as much a Siouxsie & The Banshees side project as a Cure one, since aside from Smith (who was himself twice a Banshee) the Glove was full-time Banshee Steve Severin. They also came about largely because Siouxsie Sioux and Budgie were off recording their own Banshee side project, the first Creatures record. It also owed a lot to the neo-psychedelic direction that the Banshee's had first pursued with 1980's Kaleidoscope

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Famous Grey Raincoat - Or, Silly Goth, Vampires Are for Kids!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 6, 2010 04:45pm | Post a Comment

In honor of this lovely weather we're having here in Los Angeles, I'm going to blog about the so-called Raincoat scene. Before Goth -- for that matter, before New Grave, Dark Wave, Cold Wave or any of those other overly specific scenes (that I will dutifully write about in time), the British music press took to lumping together a bunch of bands and their fans and calling them "raincoats." Why? Because since their invention in the 1850s, nothing has silently and eloquently conveyed, "I'm dark, brooding and Romantic" like slouching in a trench coat. OK, it could also convey, "I'm stealing porn and not wearing clothes underneath." That's a different sort of Raincoat Brigade.


The earliest usage of "raincoat" in this sense that I've found is in an edition of NME. "1982 was also a year of recession in the U.K. A broken economy, you could argue, enabled both genres to flourish: sleek synth-pop helped people transcend national gloom, glowering raincoat-rock authorised them to wallow in it."