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Next Amoeba Red Bull Sound Select Show Features Milo Greene April 29

Posted by Amoebite, April 1, 2015 06:00pm | Post a Comment

milo greene red bull sound select

Amoeba has curated the next Red Bull Sound Select show in L.A., featuring electro-poppers Milo Greene.

The show, which is 21+, takes place Wednesday, April 29 at The Echo. RSVP for a $3 entry. (RSVP does not guarantee entry; plan to arrive early.) It’s $12 without an RSVP at the door.

Milo Greene features the work of four very talented people. On their latest album, Control, Marlana Sheetz takes the lead for the cool Hollywood dance-pop of “White Lies,” sitting nicely alongside likeminded artists such as HAIM and Jessie Ware, while the male-fronted songs from her three bandmates are no less beguiling, as “On the Fence” draws influence from the likes of A-ha for a smart and instantly pleasurable new wave-jam.

avid dancer

They’re joined at this show by L.A.-based Avid Dancer, the indie pop-rock project helmed by Jacob Summers. Summers grew up an outsider to popular music in a devoutly Christian household. After serving in the Marines for four years, Summers has since come into his own as a musician, touring with the likes of Hamilton Leithauser, Cold War Kids and Warpaint. Hear the soulful “Stop Playing With My Heart” below:

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Album Picks: Frank Ocean, Blanche Blanche Blanche, Jeff the Brotherhood, Plus Albums Out Today

Posted by Billy Gil, July 17, 2012 04:18pm | Post a Comment
Album Picks:

Frank Ocean Channel OrangeFrank Ocean’s music touches such a raw nerve because it’s the rare album that fully appeals on a here-and-now pop level while referencing classic pop — in this case, pop and soul maestros like Stevie Wonder and Elton John — and offering something else entirely. This something else is that human, overexposed, heart-and-mind-on-sleeve content that firmly roots Channel Orange in the social network era. I was late to the game; the first time I heard “Thinkin Bout You” was the day before Ocean very publicly came out of the closet. That happenstance was strange for me — the thing that first struck me about the song, aside from its obvious craft, the kind of instantly memorable hit that combines a suave, easy to follow melody and arrangement with dagger-in-the-heart lyrics, was an indescribable “third” quality beyond music and lyrics that I usually find with my favorite music, whether it’s The Smashing Pumpkins, The Beatles or, perhaps more relatedly, morose ’90s/'00s R&B hits like PM Dawn’s “Die Without You,” Fabolous & Tamia’s “So Into You,” Lauryn Hill’s “Ex Factor” and so on. It’s that sort of feeling that hits you immediately and reminds you of all the stupid unrequited crushes, moments of indirection, and fleeting feelings of serenity in youth. That Ocean possibly wrote the song about his own unrequited same-sex love made sense to me, since that’s pretty much what the song reminded me of. But beyond any personal affiliation with the song, the ability to communicate such universal but difficult to pin down feelings so instantly is quite rare, and so thus should be treasured in the way rave reviews have been pouring in for Channel Orange. Indeed, I think “Thinkin Bout You” is the best song anyone will release this year, and Channel Orange likely will be the album of the year. Beyond that opening instant classic, Channel Orange brims with power. Take the lush Marvin Gaye-meets-How to Dress Well-meets-Kanye West depiction of new parenthood in “Sierra Leone,” its lyrics offering a welcome balance of vagueness and detail devoid of judgment, communicating feelings of joy and trepidation. He celebrates and also exposes the lives of privileged black youth in a seemingly realistic way, beyond the bling-style fantasies of much of hip-hop, in songs like “Sweet Life” and the brilliant “Super Rich Kids,” which sounds like a hip-hop “Benny and the Jets” playing over an episode of the similarly revelatory reality show “Baldwin Hills.” He creates an sprawling, Kanye-style centerpiece with “Pyramids,” an epic track buoyed by raunchy synth riffs that turn glittering in the song’s sweetly disintegrating second half. And he continues to explore his evolving sexuality on a trio of closing ballads, in which he sounds as comfortable and natural singing about love between men, and between men and women. Though that doesn’t at all overshadow the rest of the album, which has more merits in spades to stand on its own, it can’t be ignored, either, as a huge moment for hip-hop — for all music — as a knocking down of barriers in music, sexuality and male image through some of the most dazzling, yet thoughtful pop music being made today.


 
 
OK, enough about how great Frank Ocean is. Here’s another artist who could probably actually use another person talking about them: Blanche Blanche Blanche, from Vermont’s Zach Phillips and Sarah Smith. Their Wink With Both Eyes has been out a little while, but Pitchfork’s recent review prompted me to check it out and boy, I’m smitten. Super lo-fi antics, similar in sound to an Ariel Pink but with the playfulness of a Unicorns and the cool girl vocals of a Broadcast. They remind me quite a bit, too, of The Fiery Furnaces at their best, especially when Phillips jumps in for some vocals alongside Smith, although it’s more in restless spirit than sound. Anyway, if you like any of the aforementioned, by hook or by crook, you have to get this album. I saw one copy on the floor at Amoeba Hollywood; not sure about the other two stores, but you can also order it from us here. Really just mind-bending, haunting stuff, probably will be one of my favorites of this year. Apparently Phillips has a bunch of other projects too, like Bruce Hart, Horse Boys, GDC and Jordan Piper Philips, which I’ll now have to check out after listening to this album constantly.


 
jeff the brotherhoodReleased today was Jeff the Brotherhood’s Hypnotic Nights. The band’s anthemic rock ‘n’ roll resonates so well because their synth-tinged, nerdy fuzz rock never really went out of style, it just sort of disappeared for a while, as Weezer aimed for Beverly Hills and bands like Grandaddy dropped off entirely. Thanks to bands like MGMT and Jeff the Brotherhood, fist-pumpers for the rest of us are alive and well, like Hypnotic Nights’ irrepressible “Sixpack,” whose lyrics “I wanna cool out/and get wasted” sound like nerds finally coming of age and buying booze for the first time while listening to too much Cars and Black Sabbath (is there such a thing?). With The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach producing, real-life brothers Jake and Jamin Orral are surprisingly adept at changing things up, too, like the classic lo-fi indie rock vibes of the awesomely titled “Mystic Portal II,” which starts out with a Guided By Voices/Built to Spill style entry before launching into a beautifully melodic power ballad that ends in guitar-sitar loveliness. And songs like “Staring at the Wall” call out their psychedelia roots with heavy flanged guitars. Sorry if you peaked in high school; the A/V club kids always end up having more fun down the line.

 

Also Out Today:

 
Animal KingdomAnimal KingdomThe Looking Away
 
Animal Kingdom produce some of the sweetest, sleekest Britpop you’ll hear on The Looking Away, balancing pop smarts and expert balladry in songs like “The Wave.” Fans of Coldplay, Of Monsters and Men, and Sigur Ros, take note.
 





 
Baroness Yellow and GreenBaroness
Yellow & Green
 
Though Yellow & Green is metal band Baroness’ most accessible release yet, they haven’t lost any of the drive that have made them a favorite of diehard metal fans and indie music fans alike. Yellow & Green is melodic enough to be on rock radio — just check out the wave-like melodies and guitarwork on “March to the Sea,” complete with country-esque riffery floating below the din. But it’s also plenty tough, as John Baizley’s vocals rarely leave the low jaw-singing range and guitars, while lovely when they relent, as on the driving hard rock of “Little Things,” they rarely do.
 

 
can unlimited editionCan
Unlimited Edition and Flow Motion
 
Reissues of Can albums — Unlimited Edition collected previously unreleased Can tracks, while Flow Motion is their eighth studio album, featuring the jam “I Want More.”
 







The Dark Knight RisesThe Dark Knight Rises Soundtrack
 
Music composed by Hans Zimmer.
 








 
MatisyahuMatisyahu
Spark Seeker
 
Matisyahu’s Spark Seeker reintroduces the performer not as the Hasidic Jewish rap poster boy but as he should be heard — a pop artist who informs his music with elements of roots reggae, hip-hop and Judaism. Songs like “Sunshine” and “I Believe in Love” are positive to the core, espousing the importance of joy, love and spirituality over buoyant reggae backbeats that will land these songs everywhere from pop radio to religious retreats.



 
john mausJohn
MausA Collection Of Rarities & Previously Unreleased Material

It’s just as the title says, with 16 tracks composed by the cerebral yet goofy John Maus over the past decade or so. Key track “Bennington” boasts a raunchy synth groove and lyrics like “I miss those funky eyes.”
 

 





milo greeneMilo GreeneMilo Greene
 
Milo Greene is a set of beautifully crafted songs that make the most of the band’s five-person set-up, taking cues from the Fleet Foxes as each musician contributes to the band’s folky soundscapes and lush harmonies. Check out the band’s live streaming performance at Amoeba (and Amoeba.com) tonight at 7 p.m. and read my interview with them here.
 



 
nas life is goodNas
Life is Good
 
One of the greatest MCs of all time returns with his 10th studio album, with production by Salaam Remi and No I.D., and appearances by Rick Ross, Mary J. Blige and the late Amy Winehouse.
 

 





smashing pumpkins pisces iscariotSmashing PumpkinsPisces Iscariot (Reissue)
 
So excited about this one, maybe even more so than the recent Gish and Siamese Dream reissues. Fans have long known Pisces Iscariot, the Pumpkins’ 1994 B-sides album, to be as strong as anything in their catalog. So great to have it on vinyl, and in a deluxe edition with additional tracks such as their dynamite cover of Ozark Mountain Daredevils’ “Jackie Blue,” early new wave jam “My Dahlia” and an awesome live version of non-album psych-punk jam “Slunk.”
 


 
The Very BestThe Very BestMTMTMK
 
The second album from duo The Very Best is a genre-hopping world music mashup of ideas, incorporating afropop, reggae, hip-hop and house music.
 

Milo Greene Set to Play Amoeba With Live Webcast As Debut Record Lands

Posted by Billy Gil, July 15, 2012 04:00pm | Post a Comment
Milo Greene is British. He’s well-dressed — three-piece suit and the like. He’s incredibly confident and charming, he’s well-spoken, he’s an intellectual, but also a man’s man. He’s exactly six feet tall to the millimeter, and if he were a dad, he’d be the No. 1 dad.
 
Milo Greene the man also isn’t real — they are a band, not a dude. He’s a fictional character band member Robbie Arnett invented when forming the band with Andrew Heringer. When contacting venues, Milo Greene would send the requests, and Arnett and Heringer saw their fortunes rise accordingly, getting better shows.
 
Now a five-piece who’ve taken the moniker Milo Greene as their own, in a bit of Belle & Sebastian-style alluring bewilderment, is set to release its debut, self-titled record July 17. The band plays Amoeba Hollywood the same day, at 7 p.m. with a live webcast.
 
milo greene milo greeneThe L.A.-based band’s debut record, Milo Greene, offers the same sort of intimate harmonies and natural harmonies of a Fleet Foxes or, further back, Fleetwood Mac just as Stevie and Lindsay joined the band. Written in part in a cabin in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and recorded with co-producer Ryan Hadlock (Ra Ra Riot, Blonde Redhead, The Gossip, The Lumineers) at Bear Creek Studio, a converted early 1900s barn in the country outside of Seattle, it’s a beautifully crafted set of songs that makes the most the band’s five-person set-up. They offer lush harmonies on songs like “Don’t You Give Up On Me,” which sounds like a gorgeous gospel intervention. Lone girl Greener Marlana Sheetz in particular stands out on songs like “Perfectly Aligned,” in which Sheetz’s testimonial vocals are wrapped in just the right amount of gauzy reverb while the boys (who include Graham Fink and Curtis Marrero, in addition to Arnett and Heringer) back her up with swaying folk-rock, along with electric swells of sound and strident harmonies when necessary. The whole thing’s, you know, perfectly aligned.
 
I sat down to talk with Fink about what it’s like to be in a folk band in L.A. in 2012, and what records and songs are doing it for him these days (Hint: Lots of ’90s R&B).
 
Me: Truthfully it was a bit hard to find out more about you guys, and along with the whole “Milo Greene” concept, it seems to me sort of an early Belle & Sebastian situation where you want the music to stand for itself and not for any member of the collective to stand out. Is that fair to say?
 
Fink: Absolutely. This is a very collective group, and the music has always stood at the forefront. We liked the idea of just releasing some live videos early, so people could see the five of us in a room, making music. No lead singer, no gloss, music first and foremost. That being said, I'm really trying to get famous so I can be gifted courtside Clippers tickets.


 
Me: I love the idea of the band retreating to a cabin to write free from modern distractions. The notion reminds me a bit of Bon Iver and Fleet Foxes. You don’t hear a lot of that kind of thing in L.A. anymore it seems! Although Hotel Café and things like that do exist. Do you see L.A. as having a viable folk scene? Was it hard to get noticed around here, and do you see more response outside of L.A.?
 
Fink: We never really thought of ourselves as a folk band, definitely qualities of folk in our music, but I think there are a lot of bands right now that share that common thread. They should call it Folk+ a la Google+. Two of the bands that we get compared to, and are fans of, are Local Natives and Ed Sharpe, and if they're indicators, L.A.’s a pretty good place to grow and get noticed for a band with folk qualities. After all, it is the city of hybrids. We do see an amazing response to banjo throughout the country though, damn people love banjo.
 
Me: Do you write songs collectively? How does the songwriting process happen for this band?
 
Fink: Four of us are former lead singers and songwriters, so every song is different. One person may write the bulk of it, four people may write the bulk of it, it’s a hodgepodge, but there's group quality control for everything that we release.


 
Me: I could see Milo Greene as being a band that is best experienced live, in that you get the full effect of the harmonies and interplay. Was it hard to get the sound you wanted on record?
 
Fink: The record and our live show are a little bit different, but I think they complement each other. The record lulls you into this dreamy world, it's serene at times, and a bit softer than the live show, which we try to inject a bit more energy into. At our concerts, Marlana head bangs, Robbie does back flips, Curtis takes his shirt off — and you'll have to come see us to find out if that's true!
 
Me: Can you make us a list of records you’re into right now?
 
Fink: I’m pumped for the to-be-released albums from our friends Superhumanoids and PAPA, they sound gooooooood.
 
Here's a list of tunes as well [Note: I’ve linked to the relevant record, when available, at Amoeba]:
 
1. Shuggue Otis’ “Strawberry Letter 23”: Whether it's a sun roof, moon roof or a simple side window, roll it down and pump out the yam!


 
2. SWV’s "Right Here": Ummm...Sisters With Voices! And Michael Jackson sample?! Duh.


 
3. Tangerine Dream's "One Night In Space": Summerdrugssummerdrugssummerdrugssummerdrugs.


 
4. James Brown's "The Payback": Summer Soul Session, aka, Triple S'zzzzzzz!


 
5. The Human League's "Human": Slow dance summer nights.


 
6. Arrested Development's "Mr. Wendal": Introspective summer days.


 
7. Haim's "Forever": Neighborhood grooves. Kewlest girls in town!


 
8. Astrud Gilberto's "Misty Roses": If you're looking to give birth in the spring months of 2013, this might make the cut — depending on the temperature of your relationship, of course.


 
9. Dream's "He Loves You Not": Four words — bad boy for life.


 
10. Bobby Womack's "Please Forgive My Heart": June 12!