Amoeblog

Noir City Xmas, December 18

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 6, 2019 06:00pm | Post a Comment

La Otra

Join the Film Noir Foundation on Wednesday, December 18, 7:30pm at San Francisco's Castro La OtraTheatre for the annual Noir City Xmas. It will be a special evening of yule cruelty with a presentation of the dark Mexican holiday classic, La Otra (1946). The entire schedule for NOIR CITY INTERNATIONAL II, a program of noir from around the globe coming January 24-February 2, 2020, will also be revealed that night. Both events will be hosted by Eddie Muller, the Film Noir Foundation’s founder and president, as well as the host of TCM’s Noir Alley.

Dolores del Rio, one of the most beautiful actresses of all time, stars in the noir-laden thriller La Otra as identical twins: Maria, a manicurist who lives in near-poverty, and her sister Magdalena, who married the wealthy man Maria once loved. When the estranged sisters reunite at the funeral of Magdalena's husband, Maria can't help but imagine how different life would be if she could only trade places with her sister. Uh-oh. Take a guess where this is headed. Co-starring Jose Baviera, Agustin Irusta, and Victor Junco, with extraordinary cinematography by the great Alex Phillips. Del Rio enjoyed a successful career in Hollywood during the 1920s and 1930s before she returned to her native Mexico in the 1940s to claim her place as one of the nation's most renowned stars. La Otra is the first feature made under her own production banner, Mercurio. The film was also the initial collaboration between director Roberto Gavaldon and writer-activist Jose Revueltas, who would make eleven more films together becoming arguably the preeminent filmmaking team in Mexico.

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The Balkanization of the Latino/Spanish DVD Section - Happy Hispanic Heritage Month!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 14, 2010 04:07pm | Post a Comment

Just in time for the end of Hispanic Heritage Month, we've divided up the Latino/Spanish DVD section into smaller subsections based on a film's country of origin. Now there are separate sections for Mexico, Spain, Argentina, Cuba, Chile and... the most popular, American Latino films. This follows similar moves in Asian Cinema, Foreign (mostly European) Cinema and African Cinema. Of course, the key objection here is that all the films are in the same language... which isn't true. Within its confines are films in Aranese,  Basque, Castilian, Catalan/Valencian, Caló/Pachuco, Chicano, English, Galician, Llanito, Nuyorican, Occitanian, Silbo Gomero, Spanglish, Tejano and combinations of several.

It also covers a lot of genres that reflect the cultural diversity of the Hispanosphere. In addition, fans of pretentious -- I mean arty -- Mouvement panique movies routinely got all bent out of shape having to sully their hands with lucha libre movies. Likewise, homies looking for cholo movies weren't usually to interested in the works of Pedro Almodovar. Not to mention you, the customers asked us to divide it... so there you go!

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Ninas Mal (Charm School) 2007 - Mexico

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 24, 2008 09:23pm | Post a Comment

 


Niñas Mal tells the story of a spoiled fresa named Adela whose single father is running for political office. As far as self-centered Adela is concerned, daddy never makes enough time for her, so she continually rebels... meaning she gets tattoos, body piercings and probably listens to punk. She's seen as a detriment to her father's political career so he sends her off to a prestigious boarding school which promises to turn her into a model daughter. Of course, Adela has other ideas; she butts heads with her suffering teacher and tries to disrupt the experience for everyone.

Niñas Mal is basically almost identical to any American tween movie except that there' s more teen sex and gratuitous nudity. Poor-little-rich-girl Adela is a completely superficial rebel-- extremely obnoxious and unconcerned with anyone but the conventionally hunky gardener at her school. Her classmates are broadly drawn stereotypes-- the bitch, the lesbian, the braniac and the ditz.  She thinks she's got it all figured out but... you know where it's going. 

Of course, Adela's pranks and obnoxiousness never amount to an actual rejection of her privileged status, they're merely bratty.  Her father remains her suffering safety net.  If you've seen teen novelas like Rebelde or Clase 406 where being punk is merely another brand of conformity that involves hair-dye, then you know what to expect from this film.  Fight for what you believe in, kids.  Parents just don't understand.  Basically the message of the film amounts to nothing more than empty slogans and false sympathy designed to appeal to a young, eager, self-important and undiscriminating audience. The film is a harmless nothingness redecorated to appeal to children who don't know any better or care. If you're not part of the PG-13 set, it's best to skip this one.

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