Amoeblog

New "What's in My Bag?" Episode with Courtney Barnett

Posted by Amoebite, September 8, 2015 03:21pm | Post a Comment

Courtney Barnett

Courtney Barnett is an Australian singer-songwriter known for her witty, rambling lyrics and deadpan singing style. After playing with garage/grunge band Rapid Transit and psych/country band Immigrant Union, Barnett founded the label Milk! Records and released her first solo EP, I've Got a Friend called Emily Ferris, in 2012. Her next EP, 2013's How to Carve a Rose into a Carrot, won praise around the world. That year she performed at CMJ and played several European dates, eventually releasing both EPs together as The Double EP: A Sea of Split Peas.

Courtney BarnettIn March 2015, Barnett released her debut full-length, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit. To promote the album, she performed at SXSW before heading out on a lengthy, globe-spanning tour. Universally critically-acclaimed, the album reached the #4 position on the Australian Albums chart and #20 on the Billboard 200 in the US. Just this month, Barnett was nominated for four Australian Independent Music Awards, including Best Independent Artist and Best Independent Album.

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The Art of the LP Cover- Eggs, Part 2

Posted by Mr. Chadwick, September 24, 2011 05:30pm | Post a Comment

Sunny side up, hard boiled, scrambled or even fossilized.
Between this and last years blog I've got all the bases covered.
I've even thrown in a couple of labels and a sticker!
To check out last year's gallery, click here.

1980's CALIFORNIA PUNK SHOW FLYERS

Posted by Billyjam, January 28, 2009 11:35pm | Post a Comment
subhumans
I recently found a bunch of old California punk flyers buried in a box that had been stored for years since back in the 80s when these shows that took place in both the Bay Area (SF and Berkeley) and in SoCal. This Amoeblog focuses on some California punk flyers from the 1980's.

Almost as much as I loved the music itself, I equally loved most of the simple but impassioned flyer designs and the raw energy that went into making them. They were  often created by a band member or one of their extended crew. While the styles ranged a little bit from one flyer to another, they were usually just handdrawn graphics or images or maybe just one simple image cut out of a magazine and slapped on the page.

Sometimes the main information (the band names or club info) might have been handwritten or else typed out, but not like today on a computer. Back then it was usually made on a typewriter, then blown up on a copy machine to match the scale of the flyer.

Compared to now, when everyone has the luxury of a tricked-out computer oozing with graphic programs etc. that can do every type of desired design at the click of a finger, this was an archaic and simple time. It was when cut-and-paste meant literally cutting out an image or graphic with a scissors and pasting it with glue or Scotch tape or sometimes just spit to hold things in place. Having a friend who worked at a local Xerox store or working there yourself was always a plus. Same went for those who did fanzines. I remember many show flyers being so rushed that they would be Xeroxed and all passed out before anyone would catch some glaring typo or ommission such as the date of the event having been left off the flyer! Or sometimes with handwritten flyers it was impossible to make out the name of the venue or the date because it was so badly drawn or so artisitically done that design prevalied over content and legibility.fucked up and photocopied