Amoeblog

Washed Ashore: It's Always Summer with Carolina Beach Music

Posted by Kells, September 7, 2010 11:53am | Post a Comment
carolina beach music record player washed ashore north carolina outer banks vacation oldies soul seaweed sand surf

In a hallmark episode of Mad Men Don Draper said, "Nostalgia -- it's delicate, but potent. Teddy told me that in Greek, 'nostalgia' literally means 'the pain from an old wound.' It’s a twinge in your heart far more powerful than memory alone. This device isn’t a spaceship, it’s a time machine. It goes backwards, and forwards… it takes us to a place where we ache to go again. It’s not called the wheel, it’s called the carousel. It lets us travel the way a child travels – around and around, and back home again, to a place where we know we are loved."

Of course, for all of you out there who, unlike me, don't voraciously follow the AMC series, Don was pitching an ad for a slide projector (nostalgia, indeed) to a potential client. However, I like to think that this quote speaks of yet another rotary mechanism with equal validity, both practically and emotionally speaking, though there may be some folks who'd arguCarolina beach music vinyl single 45 rpm 7" seven inch record platters washed ashore on a lonely island in the sea shage the dingus as obsolete. Well, my record player is still alive and spinning, taking me to new places as often as it swings me back, right 'round, home-bound again like a flawlessly sound-tracked time machine. I can offer no better example of this cyclical sentimental journey than the summer season I spent aboard my little hi-fi this year enjoying an endless rotation summer jams beginning with the fresh sun-soaked (and smog-stained) sounds of Ariel Pink's Haunted Grafitti, what with the extremely timely June 7th release of Before Today on 4AD, and, now that summer is winding down, rounding out the season with a mess of Carolina beach music 7" singles culled from the belly of the 45's bargain bin at Amoeba Music in San Francisco.

Continue reading...

Mad Men Charity Auction - Own a Piece of Now-Defunct Sterling-Cooper

Posted by Miss Ess, August 13, 2010 11:09am | Post a Comment
mad men

Ever wanted to have one of Betty Draper's opulent dresses for yourself? Or perhaps you've drooled over the flawless mid-century furniture that populates the set of the best show currently on television, Mad Men.

mad men

Well, now here's your shot to own a little piece of the show! Select items used in episodes of Mad Men, including clothing, chairs, paintings (the one pictured above!) -- even Pete's turntable, and Joan's green dress from the infamous lawn-mower episode of Season 3, plus much more, are up on eBay, with the proceeds going to City of Hope, a life threatening illness center. The frenzy ends on August 22nd, so hurry and check all the items out here!

Continue reading...

A Single Man - Definitely Singular

Posted by Miss Ess, December 30, 2009 04:22pm | Post a Comment
In many ways, it seems like a bad idea for someone who is a fashion designer to make a film, doesn't it? It seems so egotistical, so over the top, for someone with great success in one highly visible industry to attempt it in another. Sure, occasionally it works out, but for the most part, we've seen enough celebrities try their hands at creative endeavors in genres other than the one they've become popular in to great failure. Bruce Willis, anyone? Mariah Carey? Russell Crowe? Ethan Hawke?

But Tom Ford has, against the odds, done it well. A Single Man, his first feature film, is out now and it is fantastic.

a single man

See, for all the reasons that making a film when you are a highly accomplished fashion designer sounds a single man colin firthlike a potential disaster, there are other reasons that make sense if (big if) it is done right; after all, both film and fashion are visual mediums. And Tom Ford proves yet again that he has a gifted eye by beautifully and movingly capturing the anguish and lasting sorrow of an English professor living in Los Angeles in 1962. After about a year, George Falconer (played by Colin Firth) still can't get over the sudden death of his long term lover. Ford brings precision and artistry to the film, taking the viewer directly into the George's world, showing us how slowly time ticks by, how he feels like he is drowning, his total isolation and all-consuming grief. His world has literally faded to grey and we see its colors through his eyes. There are moments of brightness, but mostly it is dulled.

The film also portrays the suffocating feeling of being forced to stay clojulianne moore a single manseted in the early 60s. Julianne Moore is perfection as Charley, George's desperate, gilded best (only?) friend. Aside from Charley, George is kept from connecting to the vast majority of the world even if he wanted to, simply by his status as a gay man in an unaccepting society. This, along with his unspeakable sorrow, causes him to feel disconnected from pretty much everything and everyone, but the events of the single day in which the film takes place try to show him otherwise.
chris and don: a love story
Befitting a film made by someone who has spent his career in visual design, the film is awash in eye candy, from the sets to the clothing, of course. Being angsty, stereotype shattering and set in '62, of course it's Mad Men-esque, and Jon Hamm even has an appearance in the film, although it is just his recognizable voice over the phone.

Continue reading...

In Treatment - Byrne vs. Hamm Smackdown!

Posted by Miss Ess, September 17, 2009 06:37pm | Post a Comment
When I was watching the Golden Globes last year, I eagerly anticipated the Best Actor in a TV Series - Drama category. I had tuned in pretty much just for this moment: to see Mad Men's Jon Hamm get up there and make an acceptance speech. After gorging myself on two season's worth of the delicious Mad Men in record time, I was 100% sure that he was a shoe-in to win.

Surprise! The Golden Globe went to Gabriel Byrne for In Treatment.

in treatment

From that moment on, I knew I had to check out In Treatment...I mean, if you can beat Jon Hamm's tortured, pefectly reined in depiction of Don Draper as far as acting goes...somethin's up.

In Treatment Season 1 is finally out on DVD and I've been watching it here and there for the past fewin treatment weeks. The reason I've been moving so slowly on it is there's a whole lotta show...as in, one half hour, five nights a week...9 discs worth of show! Is that some kind of record or something?

Anyway, the show is great. I have to say though, if you don't enjoy slow moving character studies, this is not the show for you. It's simply about a therapist and his patients, one patient per half hour episode, five nights a week, with the fifth night reserved for Paul (Byrne)'s own session with the fabulous Dianne Weist as Gina, his therapist.

What's so good about this show to me is that it is all about details and slow reveals. You might think a show that is this seemingly simplistic would be dull as tombs, but for me at least, there is great pleasure in the writing and the layers to each character that slip off weekly like the skin of an onion. I applaud its creator, writers and directors for working so deftly and interestingly within such spareness.
in treatment
So, after having a good gander, do I think the Emmy is deserved? Well, yes, because the show really allows Byrne to act subtly, to keep a great deal of emotion boiling just below the surface -- moments are registered much more in his expression than verbally, and that takes en pointe skill and precision, particularly to keep such a conceptionally bare show interesting. He also is the only actor who is in every single episode of this epically produced series, so he's got a whole lot of material to get through and does so with ease. But do I think he should have won over Jon Hamm's tour de force as Don Draper...? Nah. I think Hamm's performance is one of my favorites in TV history. But both Mad Men and In Treatment are finely acted, worthwhile and compelling television.

Continue reading...

Mad Men Season 2

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, August 5, 2009 12:15pm | Post a Comment
by Scott

mad men season 2

When a cable show starts its 2nd season, there's always a fear that it won't be a worthy successor to the previous one. There's also a hope that, because of the show being given a green light for the 2nd season, mad men season 2the show will push the envelope and try things that they wouldn't have tried in the 1st season.

Mad Men's 2nd season is every bit as good as its 1st -- in some cases, better. AMC has the best show on television: it's halfwayjackie kennedy between a miniseries and a feature film. It's lit and costumed like a feature film, but with the low story arc of a miniseries.

There are many extras in this newly released DVD set of Season 2: do yourself a favor and watch the documentaries first. There are lots of shorts on cultural events of the 60s (Jackie Kennedy's tour of the White House, the Port Huron statement, and Mark Rothko, to name a few). There are longer documentaries on feminism (spread out over 2 discs) and fashion through the entire decade of the 1960s. Commentaries, especially those by the show creator, Matt Weiner, are insightful and entertaining, but should be heard after watching each episode.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  1  2  3  >>  NEXT