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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Shooter Jennings

Posted by Amoebite, May 7, 2019 05:03pm | Post a Comment

Shooter Jennings - What's In My Bag?

In our 600th What's In My Bag? episode, countrysinger-songwriter Shooter Jennings explored the laserdisc section at Amoeba Hollywood and picked up LPs by David Bowie, Hank Williams Jr., and Jaime Wyatt. "I went right for David Bowie," he told us. "I've been listening to a lot of David Bowie lately. Me and a friend of mine been working on something (and) we've just been plowing through Bowie. He's one of my favorites of all time."

The son of country music royalty Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter, Shooter Jennings grew up on tour buses, sometimes playing drums in Waylon's band. He began playing drums at age five, studied Shooter Jennings - Shooter - Amoeba Musicpiano at age eight, and took up the guitar at age fourteen. Shooter moved to Los Angeles in 2001 and started the rock band Stargunn. He signed to the label Universal South Records in 2005 for the release of his solo debut Put the "O" Back in Country. Album single "Fourth of July" peaked at #22 on the Billboard Hot Country charts. That same year, Shooter took on the role of his father in the Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash biopic Walk the Line.

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Laserdisc Blowout Ending Soon

Posted by Eric Brightwell, March 25, 2008 05:07pm | Post a Comment


Right now there's a raging Laserdisc blowout occurring on the mezzanine here at Amoeba Hollywood. The big, shiny discs with the high mass are blowing out at low, low prices.


Most kids today, when they see a laserdisc, assume that they're silver vinyl soundtracks but some of us remember the extinct format, especially if we're Japanese.


Laserdisc technology was developed in the late 1950s and demonstrated for the public in 1978. Laserdiscs were first sold in Atlanta, possibly because of its reputation as "The City Too Busy To Hate." The first title available was, ironically, Jaws, a low budget monster film about a shark with nothing to do but hate.


Over the next 12 years, dozens of titles were released on the format. Common complaints against Laserdiscs were the limited catalog and high prices ($89.99 for Honey I Blew Up the Kid). Also, you couldn't tape your stories on 'em and you had to flip them over just when the kid is growing into a giant! The most common rejoinder I've heard for the latter gripe is, "That's when I get up and get a beer!" There's a lot of "You too, I thought I was the only one" moments in the laserdisc section, which is one of the great things about the medium. Also, you can freeze frame and get a clear picture, maybe glimpsing some naughty bits on a cartoon character snuck in by a frustrated Disney animator.