Amoeblog

(In which Job introduces the character Ryan.)

Posted by Job O Brother, February 21, 2010 06:56pm | Post a Comment

Ryan "Mouth-hole" Cassano

This weekend I played host to a friend of mine, Ryan “Mouth-hole” Cassano, who was visiting from my beloved home town of Nevada City, California. He had come to investigate 1980’s video arcade games and literature concerning it for some future enterprise that I’m not at liberty to divulge but involves alcohol, supermodels, and rooms of plastic balls.

He met me after my hard but spiritually fulfilling shift at Amoeba Music Hollywood, waiting out the last few minutes of my shift by browsing the clearance section of soundtracks, where he found two items that made him squeal like a flame-covered, 500 pound, chocolate gorilla who sounded like a happy little girl: the soundtrack to the film Kill the Moonlight (which features some very early work by Beck), and to the documentary King of Kong: Fistful of Quarters.

The latter was serendipitous, as it was related to his arcade quest. In fact, he was traveling with a copy of that very film and insisted I watch it with him. I told him he wasn’t the boss of me and I can do whatever I want and I hate I hate him I hate him, then we drove back to my place for a home-cooked dinner of gimlets.
Just like Ma used to make!

I introduced him to the refined art of Tom of Finland, who’s work is so lovingly collected in my Taschen art book. He found it deeply educational and oftentimes frightening. Imagine my embarrassment when, half way through flipping through the book, I realized it was a souvenir photo album of my trip to the Anne Frank House! A common mistake, sure, but no less silly.

Puzzler: Can you tell which one is which?

After half an hour of explaining to him the difference between gay sex and the methodical genocide of six million people, we decided to go to bed.

Broad Contemporary Art Museum

Posted by Gomez Comes Alive!, March 8, 2008 11:33pm | Post a Comment

I finally had a chance to check out LACMA's new building devoted to modern art. The Broad Contemporary Art Museum opened to less than favorable reviews, but for someone like me who had never had a chance to witness these famous works up close, I was glad that they made this.

The BCAM comes from the collection of Eli and Edythe Broad, who have collected famous works from a selective group of artists for the last forty years. Among those artists are Andy Warhol, Mike Kelley, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman and recent Academy Award nominee, Julian Schnabel.

The architecture of the building is pretty amazing. The elevator shaft that runs through the entire three-story building is an installment in itself, courtesy of Barbara Kruger's still unfinished piece. The museum devotes the entire first floor to Richard Serra's sculptures. Band and Sequence are two separate metal sculptures that are fifteen feet in height and took over two and half years to create. Walking through them, I had the feeling I was a few centimeters tall walking through a maze of ribbon.

I am by no means an expert in modern art but I can see why BCAM has created uproar in certain art circles. For one, the art collected by the Broads is limited, no matter how groundbreaking it is. There are many great contemporary artists whose art has had more influence in society that are not included simply because the Broads aren't collectors of their work. Also, the artists are limited to just American artists, which limits the scope of contemporary art of the last forty years even further. Still, to be able see the work of these great artists up-close makes me think how much these artists have influence culture, advertising and how we view everyday life.

Continue reading...
BACK  <<  1  2  >>