Amoeblog

Hip-Hop History Tuesdays: West Coast Rap the First Decade Part III: Breakin' N Enterin' Documentary + Captain Rapp & DJ Flash

Posted by Billyjam, December 3, 2013 11:20pm | Post a Comment

        

For this week's Hip-Hop History Tuesdays Amoeblog installment we continue with more on the topic of the first decade of LA/West Coast Rap. Above is a continuation of the video interview with DJ Flash and Captain Rapp and below is the entire film of the little-seen 1983 documentary on LA Hip-hop's early history: the 84 minute film Breakin' N Enterin.  In the above video interview with Flash and Rapp, they discuss both LA rap history and their latest release, Westcoastin featuring Ronnie Hudson along with a slew of legendary West Coast rappers, which has been selling well at Amoeba Hollywood since its recent release on CD. Meanwhile, the out-of-print 30-year-old documentary on LA Hip-hop made by Topper Carew is a refreshing West Coast counterpart to such NYC hip-hop films as Wild Style and Style Wars. It showcases LA's vibrant early b-boy, poplockin, graffiti, DJ, and MC scenes. Among the many highlights of this engaging documentary told by the practitioners of the art form is the Blue City Crew out of Carson, CA featuring members of what would later become the Boo Yaa Tribe. A young Ice-T, who would not appear in the hip-hop film Breakin' until a year later, is also featured here.

Continue reading...

Unsung Hero Dannie "Fut" James of LA's Impact Record Pool Dies of Cancer

Posted by Billyjam, October 2, 2010 11:13am | Post a Comment

When tragedy strikes and a hip-hop artist dies, the sad news usually travels fast. The same is not always true with those behind the scenes soldiers in the hip-hop world: the promoters, the managers, the sound technicians etc. -- the unsung heroes working the unseen daily grind to help make it all work. Dannie "Fut" James of LA's hip-hop Impact Record Pool was such an individual. He quietly passed away from complications of multiple myeloma, a form of cancer, on September 23, 2010. He was 59 years of age.

A co-founder of the influential record pool that serviced both club and radio station DJs in SoCal and sometimes beyond, James, who was also a DJ, was described by colleague General Jeff as "a pioneer in the West Coast rap game. Back when hit records were determined by 'street buzz' first [he] had a strong hand in launching the careers of both West Coast and East Coast rap artists alike."
 
Jeff, a longtime LA rap industry insider and community activist, noted that the most striking thing about "Fut" was that he was a giving, selfless individual, who was all about the music. "He never wanted to be in the spotlight. When I first met him, I would always see him at all the record industry functions, like the BRE conferences and the R&R conferences and befriended him there." Jeff credits him with the rise of the first wave of West Coast rap. "Once West Coast rap started taking off big, I once asked James if he had a problem with not getting the recognition that he deserved," recalled Jeff. "He replied, "I don't do this for the recognition, I do this for the music! It's not about me, it's about Impact Record Pool!"

Continue reading...