Amoeblog

RIP Holger Czukay

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 3, 2017 03:05pm | Post a Comment

Holger Czukay

by Michael Henning

Can founder and bassist Holger Czukay died September 5, 2017. The band posted the following on Facebook: "We are very sad to confirm that Holger passed away yesterday, in his home, the old CAN Studio in Weilerswist. His wife U-She passed away only weeks before. Holger was devastated by the loss of his beloved partner, but was looking forward to making more music and was in good spirits. His passing has come as a shock. We will post more information about funeral arrangements shortly."



In the mid-1960's, Czukay studied under electronic music pioneer Karlheinz Stockhausen in Cologne. Can, Tago MagoCan's soon-to-be keyboardist Irmin Schmidt was another student of Stockhausen at that time, and it was not long before the two joined forces, recruiting guitarist Michael Karoli and drummer Jaki Liebezeit to round out the core Can lineup in 1968. Malcolm Mooney, an American living in Germany at the time, became their singer for the first few years. Can recorded their dynamic and fiery debut album, Monster Movie, with him. Mooney was later replaced by Damo Suzuki, a long-haired Japanese hippie who the band notoriously found busking on the street the day of one of their gigs. They convinced Damo to join them later that night for a performance and he stayed a member of the band for the next three albums. It was an excellent match, one that yielded some of the band's best work, including their sprawling psychedelic double LP masterpiece Tago Mago, the now-heavily sampled funky grooves of Ege Bamyasi, and the endearing ambient-rock classic Future Days.
Holger Czukay
Czukay did most of the engineering and producing of the early Can albums, shaping their sound with his incisive tape cutting technique, and turning group improvisations into finished pieces. No less important to the group's sound, he also played the bass with a unique style which might be best summed up as "minimalist avant-funk." Of his chosen instrument, Czukay once said “the bass player’s like a king in chess. He doesn’t move much, but when he does he changes everything.”

Continue reading...

One Album Wonders: Silberbart's 4 Times Sound Razing

Posted by Eric Brightwell, July 21, 2014 12:27pm | Post a Comment
The vinyl LP was introduced by Columbia Records in 1948 but the 45 inch single remained the primary market for the music industry until the dawn of the album era, which began in the mid-1960s. In that era, for any number of reasons, many fine musical acts released only one studio album. This series looks at some of my favorite "one album wonders."

*****


SILBERBART - 4 TIMES SOUND RAZING (1972)