Amoeblog

Kitchens of Distinction Vinyl Reissues Coming Soon

Posted by Amoebite, January 9, 2018 04:27pm | Post a Comment

Kitchens of Distinction Vinyl Reissues

Cult favorite post-punk band Kitchens of Distinction burned fast and bright, releasing four excellent and atmospheric LPs between the period of 1989-1994. The band's first self-released single, "The Last Gasp Death Shuffle," landed them a deal with British indie label One Little Indian. Their first singles for the label -- "Prize" and "The 3rd Time We Opened the Capsule" -- made their way onto NME's 1992 list of the 100 Best Indie Singles Ever. Unabashedly political, the band were shoegaze before there was shoegaze, with an out-and-proud frontman. Although they didn't always get the props they deserved then, four new reissues coming January 19, 2018 should go a long way toward introducing the band to fans of swirling guitars, passionate vocals, and clever lyrics.

You can pre-order them now at Amoeba.com and they'll ship for free to the U.S.!

Love Is Hell

Love Is Hell (1989)

The 20 Best Shoegaze Albums

Posted by Billy Gil, March 7, 2014 06:21pm | Post a Comment

Islowdivenspired by the reunion of shoegaze greats Slowdive, Amoeblogger Brad Schelden and I have compiled our list of favorite shoegaze albums.

For any who don’t know, shoegaze is a style of music rooted in the noise pop of The Jesus & Mary Chain and dream pop of Cocteau Twins from the early ’80s. In the late ’80s and early ’90s, bands took elements put forth by those bands—loud, distorted guitars, heavily reverbed vocals and emphasis on atmosphere over discernable lyrics—and came up with a new sound, first truly realized by My Bloody Valentine on their classic 1988 album, Isn’t Anything. Shoegaze (or shoegazing) was a term NME and Melody Maker in the U.K. used to describe the visual representation of the sound from bands who rose in My Bloody Valentine’s wake, depicting bands’ apparent lack of movement onstage and propensity to stare down at their numerous effects pedals. The genre hit its heyday in the early ’90s but persists today, with bands like My Bloody Valentine and Swervedriver reuniting and artists like M83 and Diiv using elements of their sound (so-called nu-gaze, but I’ll avoid that terrible term). So with that lengthy explanation, here we go.

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