Amoeblog

Amoeba SF Acquires Unique Collection of 1970s Experimental & Art Music LPs

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, August 30, 2017 07:01pm | Post a Comment

We at Amoeba SF recently acquired a unique collection of 1970s Experimental and Art music, all on vinyl! Joan la BarbaraThis collection spans across the genres of Minimalism, Musique Concrete, post-Ornette Jazz, Tape Music, Spoken Sound Art, early Electronic, and more, and are all in excellent condition. These records will be made available for sale on Saturday, September 9th at Amoeba SF. Head to our stage (in the northwest corner of the store) to browse these gems. There will be staff on hand to help you view bagged items and to bring your choices to the cashiers. You must be in the store to purchase items for this one-day event. We won't be taking phone orders and we won't be putting these items on hold.

Some of the artists who are heavily represented in this collection:
Terry Riley (10 LPs)
Cecil Taylor (40 LPs!)
John Cage (15)
Steve Reich (15)
Anthony Braxton (25)
Philip Glass (many)
Art Ensemble of Chicago (20, PLUS numerous by its individual members)
Julius Hemphill (10)

Plus, there many rare and import recordings by David Murray, Leo Smith, Frank Lowe, Alvin Lucier, Meredith Monk, Henry Cow/Slapp Happy/Art Bears, Joan LaBarbara, Robert Ashley, Jon Gibson, Gordon Mumma, and more!

Of particular note, there are VERY RARE recordings by Joseph Beuys & Henning Christiansen, Charlemagne Palestine, LaMonte Young, Le Forte Four, and Allen Kaprow, just to name a few.

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(In which Job introduces the character Ryan.)

Posted by Job O Brother, February 21, 2010 06:56pm | Post a Comment

Ryan "Mouth-hole" Cassano

This weekend I played host to a friend of mine, Ryan “Mouth-hole” Cassano, who was visiting from my beloved home town of Nevada City, California. He had come to investigate 1980’s video arcade games and literature concerning it for some future enterprise that I’m not at liberty to divulge but involves alcohol, supermodels, and rooms of plastic balls.

He met me after my hard but spiritually fulfilling shift at Amoeba Music Hollywood, waiting out the last few minutes of my shift by browsing the clearance section of soundtracks, where he found two items that made him squeal like a flame-covered, 500 pound, chocolate gorilla who sounded like a happy little girl: the soundtrack to the film Kill the Moonlight (which features some very early work by Beck), and to the documentary King of Kong: Fistful of Quarters.

The latter was serendipitous, as it was related to his arcade quest. In fact, he was traveling with a copy of that very film and insisted I watch it with him. I told him he wasn’t the boss of me and I can do whatever I want and I hate I hate him I hate him, then we drove back to my place for a home-cooked dinner of gimlets.
Just like Ma used to make!

I introduced him to the refined art of Tom of Finland, who’s work is so lovingly collected in my Taschen art book. He found it deeply educational and oftentimes frightening. Imagine my embarrassment when, half way through flipping through the book, I realized it was a souvenir photo album of my trip to the Anne Frank House! A common mistake, sure, but no less silly.

Puzzler: Can you tell which one is which?

After half an hour of explaining to him the difference between gay sex and the methodical genocide of six million people, we decided to go to bed.