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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Interpol

Posted by Amoebite, January 8, 2019 05:33pm | Post a Comment

Interpol - What's In My Bag? Amoeba Music

We kicked off 2019 and our first What's In My Bag? episode of Season 12 with New York indie legends Interpol! The trio went shopping at Amoeba Hollywood recently and chatted with us about some of their favorite records and movies, including Peter Weir's Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. Apparently the 19th century naval adventure/drama made such an impression on lead vocalist Paul Banks that he maybe, possibly got a tattoo inspired by the film. All three members had a lot of heartfelt and entertaining things to say about their eclectic picks, which ranged from Bad Brains to Roy Orbison and from Aphex Twin to Jesu.

The quintessential NYC indie band, Interpol consists of vocalist/guitarist Banks, guitarist/backing vocalist Daniel Kessler, and drummer Sam Fogarino. Initially formed in 1997, the group self-released Interpol - Marauder - Amoeba Musica series of EPs, and after a brief UK tour in 2001, performed on John Peel's BBC Radio program. Around this time, the band signed to Matador, who released their self-titled EP prior to the release of the critically-acclaimed, career-making 2002 full-length Turn on the Bright Lights. Interpol's sophomore LP, Antics, was released in 2004, reaching gold status on both the US and UK charts and earning them slots performing with the likes of U2 and The Cure. By 2007, the band had signed to major label Columbia for the release of their third LP, Our Love to Admire.

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Album Picks: Danny Brown, Jesu, Glasser, Lee Ranaldo, Darkside, Parquet Courts

Posted by Billy Gil, October 8, 2013 09:49am | Post a Comment

Danny BrownOld (CD)

Since Danny Brown launched from relative obscurity to stardom with his excellent mixtape XXX, it follows that his sophomore release should see the rapper sand the edges of his sound from his Internet-rap roots. Not so fast. Danny Brown’s Old doesn’t curb the weirdness that made XXX such a delight; it doubles down on it. The same highwire delivery and tight jeans that made 50 Cent balk at signing the dude are still going strong, though the humor of his previous work is turned down in favor of more straightforward storytelling—and as if in a bit for seriousness, Brown even includes “Side A” and “B” interludes to signify the break between the more laid-back first half and molly-addled crazy second half. Of course, Brown has just learned how to incorporate his wit into the songs more—“Wonderbread” is only slightly more horrifying than funny, about the perils of even going out for bread in the Detroit ghetto where he grew up, whereas the mind-bending “Lonely,” which features a sample from obscure French artist Morice Benin, sees Brown claiming his identity brilliantly (“Hipster by heart but I can tell you how the streets feel” he says, subtly reffing his childhood, selling drugs and time in prison without boasting). Brown’s collaborators—from the indie-minded Purity Ring to fellow rapper Schoolboy Q and especially the grime-influenced wunderkind Scruffizer, on the awesome “Dubstep”—aid in making Old a multifaceted affair. Producer Oh No (of Stones Throw duo Gangrene) helps set the stage for some of Old’s most striking tracks, like the Radiohead-ish “Gremlins” and manic “Red 2 Go,” though Brown at least shares the producer’s chair on each song. He offers some turn of phrase or stellar bit of production on every song, keeping you hooked on Old and hitting the replay button even after 19 tracks.

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