Amoeblog

Birthday Week Part 2: Rosemary Clooney, Maxwell, and Robert Moog

Posted by Billyjam, May 23, 2017 10:38pm | Post a Comment

In continuation of yesterday's Amoeblog tribute to Morrissey's 58th birthday and the Amoeba Music one-day storewide 20% off sale on all Morrissey and The Smiths product to celebrate the date, we continue the birthday theme today by honoring three diverse artists whose birthday fell on this date of May 23rd: Rosemary Clooney, Maxwell, and Robert Moog. In the case of the latter artist/creator, whose legacy was celebrated over this past weekend with the annual MoogFest in North Carolina, select music artists whose careers were influenced by the moog synth creator will also be celebrated in this second birthday week Amoeblog installment.   Note tomorrow Wednesday, May 24th, Bob Dylan's 76th birthday will be celebrated with both a tribute Amoeblog as well as  one-day 20% off instore sale on the artist's releases And then on Friday this week, May 26th: birth date of the late Miles Davis,  the jazz great's legacy will similarly be celebrated in this one-week series.
Born on this date in 1934 and died in August 2005 at age 75,  Robert Moog was the inventor of the Moog synthesizer five and a half decades ago and, as such, widely credited with being a pioneer of electronic music.  It was in 1965 when the Moog company rolled out the commercially available modular voltage-controlled analog synthesizer systems. The radical musical creation would alter and help shape the course of popular music over the next half century. His electronic synthesizer keyboard instrument, that originally cost $11,000, counted among its earliest owners The Beatles, Sun Ra, and Mick Jagger after its introduction at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967. As noted by such academics as Cornell University professor of Science and Technology Studies, Trevor Pinch Moog's creation and his name are often mispronounced. Moog rhymes with "rogue" not with "fugue" as it has repeatedly been mispronounced dating back to its earliest usage.

Among the earliest artists associated with the history of the Moog synth included Walter Carlos (later Wendy Carlos), Diana Ross & The Supremes, The Doors, and The Byrds followed by such others as  Rick Wakeman of Yes, Keith Emerson, Kraftwerk, and Gary Numan. Another fan of using the Moog synth, although not often associated with the instrument, was Bob Marley, But it was the aforementioned Walter / Wendy Carlos provided many music fans first introduction to the Moog with 1968 release of the crossover classical album Switched-On Bach which reworked Bach's pieces on this then new instrument. But in terms of the first big pop hit for the Moog as the main instrumentation, that occurred a few years later with the 1972 international pop hit single "Popcorn" by Hot Butter (song below) which was actually a cover of the song Gershon Kingsley wrote and first recorded in 1969 for his album Music to Moog By and done by numerous other artists including Jean-Michel Jarre who was recently featured on the Amoeblog for his WIMB? appearance.

Large Jazz LP Collection ­On Sale at Amoeba SF on April 1st!

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 19, 2017 05:03pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba San Francisco acquired a large quantity of hard-to-find Jazz records from a collection that was cultivated inVintage Jazz LPs the 1960s and '70s by a longtime Amoeba customer (who was also an ex-New Yorker). This astounding collection will hit the store on Saturday, April 1st. No joke! You gotta be here April 1st to get first crack at this collection.

The Collection
Most of the records are from the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, encompassing Free-Bop, post-Coltrane "Spiritual Jazz," South African Jazz, and more, with many rare European and Japanese imports among them. Also, there are some small-press labels, like Saturn (Sun Ra), Tribe (Marcus Belgrave's ultra-rare Gemini II), and many Strata East recordings as well!

Artists represented include Don Cherry, Archie Shepp (30 albums!), the Blue Notes (South African group) and its individual members, Mal Waldron, Steve Lacy, Yusef Lateef, Paul Bley, John Coltrane, and more.
Vintage Jazz Lps, Sun Ra Arkestra, Saturn Records
The Plan
Upon opening on Saturday, April 1st at 11am, we will have bins set up at the front of our stage (in the northwest corner of the store) that will contain the bulk of the collection. We will also have racks of "wall items" set up on the stage for the higher-valued items. There will be staff on hand to help you view bagged items and to bring your choices to the cashiers.

Pioneering Experimental Turntablist Jazz Trio Livehuman Celebrate "scratchBop" With March 16th Amoeba San Francisco In-Store

Posted by Billyjam, March 11, 2017 02:28pm | Post a Comment

San Francisco progressive jazz trio Livehuman have been together now for two full decades. In that time the turntablist/bass/percussion experimental ensemble, comprised of DJ Quest, Andrew
Kushin, and Albert Mathias, have performed countless concerts both locally and internationally including at the prestigious Montreux Jazz Festival and released a string of critically acclaimed albums. But it is only now with the recent release of their 2017 album scratchBop that these hard-working musical perfectionists feel that they've finally found their proverbial groove. They will celebrate the new album with an Amoeba San Francisco in-store Thursday March 16 at  6pm.
"Livehuman was born of an inspiration I had listening to Miles Davis' doo-bop record," percussionist Albert Mathias told the Amoeblog this week. Added the artist who cites among his other "jazz heroes"
as Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Sun Ra, and The Art Ensemble of Chicago, "That was a long time ago and for me scratchBop is what I dreamt might be possible….though I didn't realize it would take most of my adult life to achieve it." This insight by the gifted percussionist should not come as a total surprise to longtime fans of the band, familiar with such past album releases as Monostereosis: The New Victrola Method or Elefish Jellyphant, since scratchBop displays somewhat of a new musical chapter for the trio. Or as bassist Andrew Kushin calls it, "an uncovering" of sorts following years of tirelessly playing together and honing a distinct innovative jazz style. 

GQ Style’s Vinyl Jazz Bundle

Posted by Amoebite, October 23, 2016 07:40pm | Post a Comment

In the Holiday issue of GQ Style (on newsstands now), photographer Christian Weber photographed ten of the greatest living jazz musicians for an epic portfolio. To celebrate, we’ve bundled this exclusive set of LPs representing every artist in the shoot. It’s 11 albums in total, all on speaker-melting vinyl. At checkout, enter the code GQSTYLE15 to receive 15 percent off the retail price of $305.78.

Chick Corea "Vigil" Chick Corea - Vigil (2013) [180 Gram Vinyl, 2 LP Set] - $36.98

With Flying Lotus and his ilk busy making fusion cool again, 2013 was a good time for Chick Corea to revive his flashy '70s aesthetic. The Vigil should've been a breakthrough that year: From its proggy, groove-driven themes right down to the unabashedly grandiose cover art—which depicts Corea as a questing knight much like the one that adorned Romantic Warrior, a 1976 album by his high-flying supergroup Return to Forever—the album feels like a rediscovered crate digger's treasure.
Roy Haynes "We Three" Roy Haynes - We Three (1959) - $24.98

Amoeba SF Acquires Over 600 Vintage Jazz Magazines

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, August 29, 2016 08:02pm | Post a Comment

Jazz Review, Vintage magazinesAmoeba Music SF recently acquired over 600 vintage Jazz magazines, spanning from the late 1940s to the early 1990s! Titles include Down Beat, Metronome, Jazz Review, Jazz Journal (UK), CODA (Canada), and more. These issues are in great shape and you have to see them to believe them. Beautiful photography and design in both color and black & white grace the covers of these collectible time capsules of the Jazz scene. Come down to Amoeba SF and check them out in both the Magazines/Books section and in the glass collectors' case in the Jazz section.

Of particular note, we've got a complete run of Jazz Review (1958-1961), the monthly magazine started by Nat Hentoff, Hsio Wen Shih, and Martin Williams in New York, which features essays, articles, and reviews by Jazz musicians as well as by other notables such as LeRoi Jones and Harvey Pekar. We've also got pristine issues of CODA, the Canadian publication that featured less-mainstream artists than Down Beat (we've got Down Beat too from the late 1940s through the 1970s). Check out the complete volumes of Jazz Journal, which was like a British version of Down Beat that focused mainly on Blues and Jazz musicians. These are fascinating artifacts as they feature rarely seen photos of American musicians taken on tour in the UK and Europe, plus articles and photography by Paul Oliver and Valerie Wilmer, among others.

Metronome Magazine

 

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