Amoeblog

Amoeba SF Stage Transformed Into Winter Wonderland

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, December 12, 2016 06:06pm | Post a Comment

Amoeba San Francisco

By Brent James

You've been to the shows. You've seen the artists. You've always wanted to be on the Amoeba stage. NOW is your chance!

Running now until December 31st is our indoor sidewalk sale we're calling the Bizarre Holiday Bazaar! We've dug through the darkest, deepest recesses of the building and put all the choice merch out for sale. Best part? It's actually located ON the world famous Amoeba San Francisco stage!

It's a great place for photo ops, on Friday nights you'll be on stage WITH a guest DJ, and you'll find last-minute stocking stuffers such as a Tom Petty hiking bag or a Santana picnic blanket. Not your thing? How about your choice from over 100 different carded Star Wars action figures? Or maybe a KISS action figure?

In any case, there's something for everyone at Amoeba Music. With a different selection every day, you'll never see the same thing twice!

Happy Holidays from Amoeba Music!

Amoeba Hollywood Holds Toy Drive Through Dec. 18

Posted by Amoebite, December 1, 2015 04:23pm | Post a Comment

amoeba toy drive

While our food drives continue at Amoeba Hollywood and San Francisco, Amoeba Hollywood is also holding a toy drive at the same time.

Now through Dec. 18, bring in a new, unwrapped toy for children (ages 7 to teenager) to the info counter at Amoeba Hollywood and get a coupon for $2 off your purchase of $5 or more. Sorry, no violent or weapon-based toys, please.

The toy drive benefits the children of Five Acres. The organization works to prevent child abuse and neglect, and care for, treat and educate emotionally disturbed, abused and neglected children and their families in residential and outreach programs throughout LA and surrounding areas. Find out more at 5acres.org.

Movies for Mother's Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, May 10, 2015 08:02am | Post a Comment

Mary Cassatt's After the Bath (circa 1901)

The American Mother's Day was invented by Anna Jarvis in 1905, when her own mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, died. Her mother's death proved the inspiration for a holiday and by 1908 others joined her in this macabre celebration.

After five years of dedication to her obsession, Mother's Day was first observed in West Virginia in 1910. Although writing "I love you" on a post-it note would be more meaningful, by the 1920s consumers dutifully purchased pre-made Mother's Day cards from the Hallmark corporation. Disgusted by this perversion of her crazy vision, Jarvis unsuccessfully tried to kill Mother's Day. 

Whatever you do this Mother's Day, please don't spend $17.95 on a Spring Multicolor Floral Infinity Scarf, $24.95 on a Bronze Metal Birdcage Lantern Wall Decoration, or $29.95 on a Coral-inspired Jewelry Tree. Instead, take her on a hike, go for a swim, eat a type of cuisine neither of you've ever had before, go to the ballet... or watch one of these films.
*****




Mother (마더, Bong Joon-ho, 2010)


Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock, 1960)



Mildred Pierce
(Michael Curtiz, 1945)



Grey Gardens (Albert Maysles, David Maysles, Ellen Hovde, Muffie Meyer, 1975)




Treeless Mountain (So Yong Kim, 2008)



Be With You (いま、会いにゆきますNobuhiro Doi, 2004)



Mommie Dearest
(Frank Perry, 1981)




Carrie (Brian De Palma, 1976)


Precious (Lee Daniels, 2008)


Strait-Jacket
(William Castle, 2004)


Friday the 13th
(Sean S. Cunningham, 1980)



*****

Follow me at www.ericbrightwell.com

Happy Discovery Day -- Real Geographic Discoveries of the Modern Age

Posted by Eric Brightwell, October 13, 2014 04:42pm | Post a Comment

I will not make the argument that Columbus's arrival in the New World was insignificant merely because he was an absolutely awful person or because he didn't actually discover anything (which he himself maintained, claiming until his death that he'd merely found a different route to Asia). But think about this before you dismiss -- before Columbus, avocado, bell peppers, blueberries, cashews, cassava root, chili peppers, chocolate, cocaine, gourds, maize, peanuts, pecans pineapples, pumpkins, squash, tobacco, tomatoes, and vanilla were all unknown in the Old World and alcohol, apples, bananas, barley, cheese, coffee, mango, onions, rice, tea, and turnips, and wheat were unknown in the Americas. Imagine an existence without any of those and you can hopefully begin to get a taste of the importance of the Columbian Exchange. Imagine Italian cuisine without tomato sauce or gnocchi and you can't help but wonder if this is why Columbus is so dear to many Italians. Imagine, on the other hand, genocide, slavery, and old world diseases and you'll understand why he's even more hated by many others. 





 
We all know now that Columbus wasn't the first European to visit the Americas either -- but neither was Leif Erikson. Europeans had been living in the North American territory of Greenland since sometime between 876 and 932 CE when Gunnbjorn Ulfsson was blown off course and sited the world's largest island. Around 978, Snæbjorn Galti was the probably first European to set food on Greenland but we rightly don't make a big deal out of that since there were already Inuits living there and before them, an earlier people who'd arrived and abandoned the country -- and that cultural exchange was by most measures, less impactful on the planet.


The Divine Comedy - "A Seafood Song"

Greenland, of course, is just as much a part of North America as are the Bahamas (where Columbus landed) as are the US and Canada -- or Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Clipperton Island, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Martinique, Mexico, Montserrat, Navassa Island, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Saba, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Sint Eustatius, Sint Maarten, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, and United States Virgin Islands, for that matter.



Crime & the City Solution - "The Bride Ship"
 

The fact is that people have been exploring for roughly 1.8 million since Homo erectus first caught that ramblin' fever years ago and identifying the first European to do something is a silly pursuit. Exploration and adventuring, on the other hand, is vital and something done by all good people (and plenty of bad). Most of the inhabitable world was discovered in antiquity but in the post-Classical age, new lands were still being discovered by humans around the planet -- especially Arab, Austronesian, and European seafarers. In the 15th Century, the more isolated islands of the Atlantic were still being added to maps with some regularity and discovery of islands in the Arctic and Southern Oceans continued into the 20th Century. Here then is a look at some of the real discoveries of the modern age -- previously uninhabited lands just waiting for humans to despoil them.





*****

MADEIRA

Madeira (image source: World for Travel)


Madeira was first claimed by Portuguese sailors in the service of Infante D. Henrique in 1419, who were driven by storm to an island harbor which they called Porto Santo. Settlement of the island began in 1420 and by 1433 it was known as Ilha da Madeira.



THE AZORES

Azorean chamaritta 

The Azores were known of in the 14th Century but humans didn't begin to colonize them until 1433. Before arriving, sheep were deposited to establish a food source for the colonists, who included Sephardic Jews, Moorish prisoners and African slaves, as well as Flemish, French, and Spanish colonists. Nowadays there are about a quarter of a million residents of the country.



CAPE VERDE

Morna performed in the documentary Dix petits grains de terre

The volcanic islands of the Cape Verde archipelago were discovered by Italian and Portuguese navigators around 1456. The first settlement, founded in 1462, was the first European settlement in the tropics. Located off the coast of West Africa, Cape Verde's economy was predictably built on the back of the slave trade but the African population was joined by Jewish refugees from the Inquisition, as well as Dutch, French, British, Arabs, Chinese, Indians, Indonesians, and other settlers.

Tea for all -- 10 June is Iced Tea Day

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 10, 2014 11:27am | Post a Comment


(Image source -- Tikiyaki)

It's Iced Tea Day again! When people grouse about so-called "Hallmark holidays," Iced Tea Day is rarely if ever mentioned and I've never seen an Iced Tea Day card... maybe we can do something about that. 

According to the Tea Association of the USA, Americans consume 85% of their tea iced. Tea was first consumed on ice in the 1860s, when it was regarded by some as a curious fad. By the 1870s it appeared in cookbooks including Estelle Woods Wilcox's Buckeye Cookbook (1876) and Marion Cabell Tyree's Old Virginia (1877). According to Wikipedia, "Its popularity rapidly increased after Richard Blechynden introduced it at the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis." I began drinking it -- either hot or iced depending on the weather and my whims -- when I was about eight -- both for its taste and because I hoped to stunt my growth a bit (and thus hopefully not stand out so much).


Despite this long history of tea in America (remember how American colonists reacted to England's passage of the The Tea Act 1773?) my consumption of the beverage has occasionally been assumed by some of my music store coworkers to be evidence of some sort of Anglophilia. I'm unaware of any tea having ever been grown in the UK and people in Turkey, Morocco, Ireland, and Mauritania all drink more tea than the English.

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