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Well slice me nice, Eurodisco legend Fancy is coming to Orange County!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, December 23, 2013 12:56pm | Post a Comment
Fancy, the singer of hits including "Angel Eyes," "Bolero," "China Blue," "Cold as Ice," "Flames of Blue," "Lady of Ice," "Latin Fire," "Slice me Nice" and more is coming to the US for the first time ever in January, 2014. He'll be playing at R3 Social Lounge in Stanton (North Orange County/Little Saigon) on the 17th of that month. The event will be DJed by Ian "DJ BPM" Nguyen and hosted by TQ. Get your tickets by clicking here. For all you Los Angeles Italo-heads who think driving to OC is harder than crossing the Sahara -- it's only about 40 minutes from Downtown Los Angeles to Stanton. It's also served by several OCTA lines so quit making excuses.


For those unfamiliar with Fancy, he’s also written material for other artists, most notably, Grant Miller (who was introduced to Fancy by none other than Divine!), and produced notable Italo-disco hits for artists including Linda Jo Rizzo (formerly of Bobby Orlando's act, The Flirts), and Mozzart. Scoring his friends Siegfried & Roy's stage shows has exposed him to an audience who's nonetheless unaware of his identity but his greatest stuff is his solo work so here's a brief history...

Manfred Alois Segieth (or is it Manfred Aulhausen -- details about Eurodisco performers are often quite hazy) was born on July 7, 1946 in München, Germany. The son of a practically-minded craftsmen, he was enrolled in a Capuchin school where he trained to become a monk. However, a change of plans became necessary after the twelve-year-old heard schlager star Ted Harold’s “Moonlight” and subsequently picked up the guitar.

After high school, Manfred formed a Cliff Richard & the Shadows-influenced band, Mountain Shadows. At the same time, he began shopping around his own compositions which he occasionally recorded under the name "Tess Teiges," beginning in 1971.
 
1983 was the year that KISS took off their make-up, McDonald's introduced the McNugget, and I first started actively listening to music on my own after realizing that all of my classmates were obsessed with some fellow named Michael Jackson with whom I was wholly unfamiliar. If there was a "Year that Italo Broke," then 1983 was probably it too.



In 1983 Manfred adopted the suitably Italian alias, "Manfred Perilano" but more importantly, the nom de discque of "Fancy." After Fancy asked Todd Canedy to write a song for him, he recorded a demo of “Slice Me Nice” which he submitted to composer/producer Anthony Monn, who’d previously achieved world-wide successes with husky-voiced diva, Amanda Lear




Usually collaborating, Segieth and Monn embraced a brand of dance music which, thanks to its elevated sense of melody and songcraft, was as at home in and out of the dance clubs where it was most popular. Though largely unknown outside the dance scene in the Anglosphere, Fancy performed very well commercially and, along with his Eurodisco peers, he undeniably helped prepare the world for similar-sounding English musicians and producers, like Stock, Aitken & Waterman and Eurobeat acts like Dead or Alive, who achieved both club and mainstream success with a similar formula.


 
In 1984, Fancy scored a hat trick with the infectious “Chinese Eyes,”  “Get Lost Tonight” and “Slice Me Nice.” All three are absolute masterpieces of tuneful, melodramatic dance fluff that added an undeniable and irresistible Hi-NRG influence to the comparatively relaxed Italo-disco sound epitomized the previous year by Gazebo's “I Like Chopin.” There was also a strong visual element to Fancy, who seemed to shop at the same stores as ABC's Martin Fry but rock loads of make-up in the New Romantic style.


In 1985, Fancy released his first full-length album, Get Your Kicks (1985 Metronome), which included allthe previous year’s singles. He made his first appearance on French TV and performed his first shows in North America, mostly at gay clubs. His sophomore release, Contact (1986 Metronome), spawned “Bolero (Hold Me in Your Arms Again),” which was reportedly number one in Spain for nearly six months. 




That same year, Fancy extensively toured clubs in Germany, Sweden and North America. The video for another single off the album, “Lady of Ice,” featured the (as always) tarted up, shiny-clothed Fancy prancing on a laser grid dance floor in outer space and I challenge anyone reading this to come up with anythingmore '80s. "Lady of Ice" went gold in Scandinavia.

Fancy Get Your Kicks Fancy Contact Fancy Flames of Love

Fancy's third album, Flames of Love (1988 Metronome) featured both Monn/Fancy collaborations as wellas some of Fancy’s first solo compositions and its title track was huge in Poland. He closed out the decade that he seemed so indelibly tied to with All My Loving (1989 Metronome), whose title track was a hit in Europe. Like most of Fancy's Eurodisco peer, for most of the ‘90s he released little-or-no new music,instead mostly repackaging, remixing and revisiting his former glories, often clothed in the trappings of fleetingly popular styles like Eurodance, Hip-House and (more lastingly popular), Trance.
 
  Fancy Forever Magic

Fancy pursued the emerging Eurodance style with releases like Five (1990 Metronome) and with Steve D5 & Grandmaster Tess’s hip-house re-make of his “When Guardian Angels Cry,” called “When Guardian Angels… Rap,” featured on (1991 ZYX Music), which mixed some new material and with old. Attributed to “Fancy and Band,” Blue Planet Zikastar (1995 Koch International) saw Fancy moved into more straightforward pop territory and includes “Saramoti,” a piece Fancy composed for his friends Siegfried and Roy’s show, Master of the Impossible. Colours of Life (1996 G.I.B. Music & Distribution GmbH) and D.I.S.C.O. (1999 Disco Records) followed. In the 2000s, Fancy's musical output slowedconsiderably and his only new material was the release, Voices from Heaven (2004 ZYX Music) and Forever Magic (2008 Happy Vibes).

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Do not miss this opportunity to see Fancy live! And if you're an Italo/Euro-disco fan, follow Keep on Music on Facebook as they've thus far brought Fred Ventura, Gazebo, Gina T, Ken Laszlo, Lian Ross, Linda Jo Rizzo, and Tom Hooker & Miki Chieregato (Den Harrow) to Southern California and additionally thrown many other New Wave (in the Asian New Wave/Vietnamese New Wave sense of the term) events that you should stop sleeping on! See you there and...

Euro Disco star Lian Ross is coming to Orange County and Texas!

Posted by Eric Brightwell, September 4, 2013 01:34pm | Post a Comment


Lian Ross
, whose Euro disco hits include "Fantasy," "It's up to you," "Say you'll never," "Scratch my name," "You're my soul" and others, is performing two upcoming shows this month -- on 20 September at R3 Social Lounge in Stanton, Orange County and on 21 September at Red Velvet inHoustonTexas. Both events will be DJed by DJ BPM and hosted by TQ.

If you're at all familiar with the European pop scene then you probably suspect that Lian Ross is a stage name -- if so then you're correct. Ross was born Josephine Hiebel, on 8 December 1962 in Hamburg, Germany. Throughout her career, Ross's partmer both in music and marriage has been Luis Rodriguez-Salazar, himself distinguished by an impressive musical career.

Rodriguez was born in Fuente el Fresno, Ciudad Real, Spain in 1948, and as a young man played bass and guitar in Los Esclavos -- a Spanish group who played the clubs of Hamburg, the German city where Rodriguez would later make his home. His first single, "Rose von Valencia" b/w "Es kommt die nacht," was an Hispano-Teutonic ballad. More solo singles followed but it was as an arranger, co-producer, engineer and mixer (usually employing the pseudonym Bobby To) with artists like Modern Talking and C.C. Catch that Rodriguez would first truly make his mark.






Rodriguez's wife and collaborator first recorded as Josy, releasing "Do the rock" b/w "What'd you say" and "I know" b/w "Gimme more" (both 1981), and "Mama say" b/w "Stop and go" (1983) for Hamburg's Master Records.



Her last release on the label was 1984's "Magic" b/w "Who said you were the one" which also represented the couple's first collaboration with arranger Fauntleroy Skeete Davis aka "Leroy Skeete."






















In 1985 Hiebel adopted the stage name to Lian Ross and, continuing to work with Rodriguez-Salazar 
and Skeete, released "Say you'll never" and "Fantasy" b/w "Saturday night." In 1986 Ross released"It's up to you" and "Neverending love." In 1987 she released "Oh won't you tell me" b/w "Reach out" and a cover of Sylvester's "Do you wanna funk?" In 1988 she released "Say say say." In 1989 she released "Feel so good." During the same period, though uncredited, she contributed vocals to Loco Loco's "Hey Mr. DJ," Chicano's "Tengo tengo," and Don Luis y Compania's "Viva el amor." 

As was the case with many Euro disco recording artists of the 1980s, Ross/Hiebel spent most of the 1990s lending her vocals to a various dance projects including Bass of Spades, Boom Boom Club, Cherry, Dana Harris, Divina, Dreamscape, Exotica, Happy House, Hi-Q, Jay Jay, Jobel, Joelle, Shona, Stockholm Underground, Tears N' Joy, Teeko X, and 2 Funky.



During that decade, only 1994's "Keep this feeling" was credited to Lian Ross.





In 2005, again as Lian Ross, Hiebel released "I wanna" and "Never gonna lose." That year she also released a collection of hits -- The Best of and More was released in 2005. In 2009 she released "Young hearts run free."



In 2012, Ross and Alan Alvarez released their version of "Minnie The moocher" which was included on her debut album, 2013's I Got The Beat (Weiss Records). 




Tickets (limited to just 200) for the Stanton show are $30 in advance, $35 at the door (order here). More information about the Houston show soon.

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Shangri-La Sundays Presents Tim & Eric's Awesome Set

Posted by Eric Brightwell, February 24, 2011 02:12pm | Post a Comment


Time
: Sunday, March 6 at 7:00pm - March 7 at 12:30am. Make sure to mark that on your calendar and in your mobile phones and tricorders.


Location: R Bar LA 3331 8th St - WILSHIRE CENTERKOREATOWN.

CLICK HERE to see the Facebook event page and confirm that you're attending... then invite all of your friends.

*****

Free! 무료! Miễn phí! Бесплатно! Gratis! Kostenlos! 免費!

*****

Tim (DJ 2Tone) and Eric (DJ Poptone) DJing Asian/Vietnamese new wave, electro, eurodisco, freestyle, hi-NRG, Italo-disco, spacesynth and more. If you like '80s, beats, keytars, fun, synthetic fabrics, breaking, computers, booty-shaking, lasers, hairspray and drum machines you'll want to be there. 

"As always cocktail drinks served by are lovely and amazing Bartender Angela" -Tim

Afrika Bambaataa & The Soul Sonic Force



Ago

Albert One


Bad Boys Blue


Bobby Orlando


C.C. Catch


Company B


David Lyme


Den Harrow


Digital Emotion


F.R. David


Fancy


Freestyle Project


Fun Fun


Gazebo


George Lamond


Hashim


Gina T



 Jocelyn Enriquez


 Jonzun Crew


Joy



Kay Franzes


Ken Laszlo


Koto


Lil Suzy


Lime


Lisa Lisa & the Cult Jam


Lisette Melendez


M.C. Shy-D


Magazine 60


Magic Mike


Mantronix


Modern Talking


Nice & Wild


Nocera


Noel


Nolan Thomas


Pajama Party


Sabrina


Safire


Sandra


Savage


Seduction


Sequal


Shannon


Silent Circle


Stevie B


Sun La Shan


Sweet Sensation


TKA


The Cover Girls


The World Class Wreckin' Cru


Trans X


2 Hype Brothers And A Dog


Waterfront Home


Wish Key

also Angelina, Anthony, Arabian Prince, Avenue, B.O.S.E., Bad Boy Joe, Banana Band, Bass Dominator, Bass Junkie, Bazooka, Binary Ghost, Boys From The Bottom, Breakdown, Buffy, Cellophane, Charly Danone, Cheryl Hardy, Christal, Collage, Connie, Corina, Cosmic Touch, Cyber People, Cybotron, Cynthia, Daize, Danny Keith, De Johnny's, Debbie Deb, Dynamix II, Egyptian Lover, Energize, Eric, Exposé, Fake, Fantasy Life, Fascination, Felix, Frankie J, Freestyle, Funkatronic, Gigolo Tony, Hipnosis, Hot Cold, Impackt, Internal Affairs, Jaya, Jazaq, Jenny Burton, Jim Player, Josette, Judy Torres, Kelly Brown, Kidd Money, Klaas Bijland, L.A. Dream Team, Laserdance, Lian Ross, Linear, Lisa, Liscyn, Lonestarr, M.C. A.D.E., M:G DJ Spanish Fly, Maggotron Crushing Crew, Man Parrish, Mandarine, Marcus Gil, Megatrons, mindXpander, Mozzart, Nadia Cassini, Nayobe, Newcleus, Night Society, One Voice, Paul Sharada, Planet Patrol, Pluton & the Humanoids, Polaris, Protonic Storm, Proxyon, Purple Flash Orchestra, Quadrant Six, Reggie Griffin & Technofunk, Ringo, Rochelle, Rockell, Rodney Stepp, Rofo, Rygar, Sandee, Sarah Jean, Scala , Shah, Sorcery, Spanish F.L.Y., Squash Gang, Starr's Computer Band, Strafe, Strava Ganza, System Band, The Egyptian Lover, The Fast, The Future, The Mixtress, The New York Models, The S Factor, Timmy T, Tolga, Trinere, Tury Q, 12 Inches of Micmac, Twilight 22, Victoria Angeles, Vocoderion, Will to Power, Young & Restless, Yukihiro Takanawa and more!!!

Hope to see you then and there! 


Spacesynth (after a brief bit about Space Disco)

Posted by Eric Brightwell, April 14, 2008 04:00pm | Post a Comment

 

When you like a lot of the sci-fi movies from the mid-to-late 1970s, you frequently are treated to Rubellian utopias populated by horned-up hedonists, robots who are polished like (coke) mirrors and multi-racial aliens all getting together at the space disco/cantina/casino. As with almost all science fiction, it's more a reflection of the time of it's conception than any like future. This stuff was heavily indebted to the sexual revolution that preceeded it and was wholly clueless about the AIDS epidemic lying around the corner. In the tense, cold-war-fearing 80s, just a few years later, sci-fi frequently fell into two camps. On the one hand you have bands of marauders roaming the post-apocalyptic wastelands in churched-up dune buggies out to terrorize the few remaining civilized humans, who are attempting in a harsh world to preserve culture and science and maybe the knowledge of how to grow food. On the other you have gritty near-futures where market economics and technology have exploded into fearsome things, exploited by crusties who can access the internet through datajacks in their skulls. And they live in cities called Neo Tokyo and the like. But, for now, back to the 70s...

Space Disco was a briefly popular subgenre of disco which melded science-fiction-inspired style, themes and futuristic sounds (like laserguns) to your garden variety disco. It was exemplified by groups like Cerrone, Space and Sheila B. Devotion, although less stylistically single-minded artists like Sarah Brightman ("I Lost My Heart to a Starship Trooper") and Dee D. Jackson ("Automatic Lover") also dabbled in the style. In America, MECO scored a big hit with their discofied version of the theme from Star Wars.

Continue reading...

Vietnamese New Wave - Part I - German Euro-disco

Posted by Eric Brightwell, January 8, 2008 10:14pm | Post a Comment
Vietnamese New Wave

Are any of my readers out there Vietnamese? I was turned on to this amazing genre by "the Jewel of La Puente," the one and only (OK, one of thousands but still one of a kind) Ngoc Nuyen. I have asked the experts here at Amoeba Hollywood about "Vietnamese New Wave" (also referred to as Asian New Wave at times) groups and no one seems even remotely familiar with any of them, with the exception of Chris Matthews, to whom "Modern Talking" sounds familiar ...

First of all, when people talk about Vietnamese New Wave, they’re not talking about Vietnamese artists (although there is Thu Thuy, Lynda Trang Dai and supposedly a tieng viet cover of a Night Society song), but rather a movement that includes mostly German Euro-disco, Italo-disco and English synthpop artists who acquired, through means that no one seems to understand (although it definitely involves mixtapes) massive popularity amongst Vietnamese in Cali, Texas and Canada (and maybe elsewhere).

And whilst there’ve been at least four or five documentarians who’ve explored the still supposedly strange popularity of Morrissey amongst Mexicans and Mexican-Americans, to my knowledge no one has yet delved into the mysterious “Vietnamese New Wave” movement in which (in addition to OMD, Pet Shop Boys and Gazebo's "I Like Chopin") four German performers, with no radio play, no MTV exposure, no Amazon recommendations, no local performances came, against all odds, to achieve stardom in the Vietnamese immigrant population.

To start with, the term “new wave” as used in music means many different things to different people. History records that Sire records head Seymour Stein was the first to borrow the term from the 1950s and 60s film movements from Europe to describe the bands that played at CBGB like Blondie and the Talking Heads. Before long it seemingly became applied to any band formed after 1976 and was applied to such musically dissimilar artists as Spandau Ballet, Elvis Costello, Tom Petty, the Thompson Twins and definitely anyone with asymmetrical hair or '80s fashions regardless of their sound. By the late '80s, I don't remember anyone really using it anymore. "Alternative" had pretty much replaced it as the term for anything underground or bizarre (at least in Columbia, Missouri, where I was still living.) Anyway, in the context of Vietnamese New Wave, four performers loom large that are pretty much completely unknown by every non-Vietnamese I’ve talked to (except DJ Lance Rock, pictured below, with Vietnamese New Wave expert Ngoc-Thu Nguyen and some people who've never even heard of Modern Talking, including Amoeba blogger Chaz Reece).


Hi-NRG” was a term coined by the UK magazine Record Mirror which had a Hi-NRG chart and was used to describe songs with a staccato sequenced synthesizer as heard in Hazell Dean’s “Searching (I Got To Find a Man)” and Evelyn Thomas’s “High Energy.” This music, filtered through songs like Dead Or Alive’s “You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)” became known as Eurobeat to some, although I had never heard anyone arguing about the distinctions of these sounds until the age of the chatroom, many years later. There's arguements about what’s what and even Freestyle was frequently marketed as Hi-NRG in the US (as well as Latin Hip-Hop and who knows what else). Canadian band Lime was often considered Italo-disco. I’m not an expert but there is a common sound to the stars of Vietnamese New Wave, as I’m sure you’ll hear if you take the time to watch these awesome videos.

In my research I have found that they have a “New Wave Night” at the Shark Club in Costa Mesa on the first Friday of every month (in the Red Room) and it's specifically Vietnamese New Wave, so I’m going to have to check it out for further research and get back to you.


Bad Boys Blue

Bad Boys Blue was formed in Cologne, Germany in 1984 by producer Tony Hendrik and his lyricist wife Karin van Harren. The group itself was comprised of a Brit, an American and a Jamaican. They became most popular in Russia, South Africa and Ukraine.






C.C. Catch

C.C. Catch, born Caroline Catharina Müller in Oss, Netherlands, moved to Germany in the 1970s and eventually teamed up with writer Dieter Bohlen in 1985, who produced all of her hits (well, hits in Belgium, Germany, Switzerland and Yugoslavia) until they fell out in 1989.




Modern Talking

Modern Talking was formed in Berlin by Dieter Bohlen and Thomas Anders in 1984. They split in 1987 after achieving considerable popularity in Argentina, Austria, Finland, Iran, Scandinavia, South Africa and Switzerland. In the UK they were marketed toward fans of gay duos like Erasure, the Pet Shop Boys and trios Bronski Beat and Culture Club, despite their heterosexuality. In their videos and live performances they usually consciously appeared with a measured distance between them, fearing that their assumed gay image was holding them back. In 1985, Thomas Anders began wearing a necklace which spelled out his girlfriend’s name in gold letters.







Sandra

Sandra Cretu (born Sandra Ann Lauer in Saarbrücken, Germany) was in the disco group Arabesque and before she began performing solo as Sandra in 1984. After teaming up with her then boyfriend Michael Cretu, she became immensely popular in Germany, Israel, Lebanon and Switzerland. In America she is still mostly known, if known at all, as the female voice in “Sadeness,” the hit single of her by-then-husband’s group Enigma. She’s the one whispering “Sade, dit moi. Sade donne moi.”

 


Go here for Part II of Vietnamese New Wave!

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