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New "What's In My Bag?" Episode with Nails

Posted by Amoebite, October 5, 2017 02:15pm | Post a Comment

Nails What's In My Bag? at Amoeba Hollywood

Todd Jones, singer and guitarist for SoCal hardcore band Nails, recently stopped by Amoeba Hollywood to grab some some records and chat with us for a "What's In My Bag?" episode. As you might expect, his stack featured a healthy dose of punk and various types of metal, but it also included several unexpected picks, like Reign Of Terror by the Brooklyn noise-pop duo Sleigh Bells. "This sounds like people who are playing a joke on somebody," Jones said of the group's dense, aggressively poppy sound. "It was like I was in a nightmare." But somehow he felt compelled to seek them out. "I kept coming back to it," he admits."I kept listening to it, and that's when I realized 'I think I like Sleigh Bells,' and it's like the most fucking obnoxious music." Now that's an endorsement!

Southern California hardcore band Nails have attracted a serious cult following thanks to their uniquely heavy combination of death metal, grindcore, punk, and powerviolence. Formed in 2009, the Nails You Will Never Be One Of Usband consists of Todd Jones (Terror, Betrayed, Carry On, Snake Eyes, Internal Affairs), guitarist Leon del Muerte (Nausea), bassist John Gianelli, and drummer Taylor Young (Disgrace). The Obscene Humanity EP introduced the band to the world later that year. Unsilent Death followed a year later.

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Grant Hart: Yes, I Remember

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, October 3, 2017 06:59pm | Post a Comment

by Casey Dresser

Pap-boom-pap-boom-pap-boom, New Day Rising - the seminal, legendary, and absolutely classic Grant HartHüsker Dü post-hardcore masterpiece kicks off with a nice blast beat from Grant Hart before Bob Mould's swirling, fuzzy, and overdriven guitars and Greg Norton's precision dynamic bass take us where we are going for the next 40 minutes or so.

I immediately put this record on when I heard of Grant Hart's death on September 13th. It seemed like the right thing to do...

My friend Bret has a morbid fascination with people dying. Whenever someone even remotely famous dies, I get a text. They don't even have to have a Wikipedia page to warrant a "RIP" from ol' Bret ("Bill Smith, who was an extra on episode 4 of season 6 of House, passed away this morning. RIP."). I usually just ignore them; I don't care about most celebrities dying. It doesn't effect my life and I highly doubt they would be too bent out of shape if someone told them I had died. Grant was different though. Grant was still young, putting out relevant music, and surely had a lot more to give us. This one did effect my life and it made me sad.

Grant Hart was an extremely talented musician with a gift for melody and a tremendous aptitude for orchestration. He and Bob Mould met at Cheapo Records in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1979 and formed one of the greatest bands of the post-hardcore second (third?) wave punk scene that became a major name on the legendary mid-1980's SST roster. He wasn't just the drummer, he also wrote and sang about half the songs. He and Bob Mould were a Lennon-McCartney or a Jagger-Richards of the punk era - blazing new trails and writing some beautiful, innovative, and downright catchy songs along the way. They each wrote and sang their own songs and on their best albums it felt like each song was an attempt to one up the other guy. To top the previous song with a better one.

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Sin You Sinners: Joe Sarno's Civilized Sexploitation

Posted by The Bay Area Crew, March 9, 2015 05:18pm | Post a Comment

Sin In The Suburbsby Rebecca Burgan

In the wake of the new wave art house boom of the 1960s, sexploitation films and art films mimicked each other’s aesthetics to market to a wider audience. American auteur Joseph W. Sarno (1921-2010) produced a prolific catalog of softcore films in the '60s and '70s. Hoping that the hardcore genre was short-lived, Sarno found his niche in the arty sexploitation world, where dramatic lighting, complex sensitive characters, and female sexuality dominated. His technical skills and quick production time set him apart from other directors in the genre, whereas those with a comparable technique would have gone on to mainstream films. He directed his actors to express their anxieties and passions through realism, capturing gritty sexual emotion in its immediacy. He was a master of sexual cinematic verisimilitude.

Sarno’s films emphasize women’s relationships and women’s pleasure, whereas the men are more objectified as instruments to help achieve the female orgasm—a fairly fresh feminist notion at the time. Visual focus during orgasm was often directed at facial expressions rather than a tight zoom on some tight penetration. The sincerity of the sexual experience is revealed more intimately by the face. Gustav Machaty's 1933 Czechoslovakian art film, Ecstasy, starring Hedy Lamarr, was still pre-Code but was banned in America and in Germany by Hitler. Audiences watched Lamarr’s titillating nude body traipse through the woods and skinny dip in the lake, leading up to a moment of sexual ecstasy revealed only through a close-up on her pained face. The director employed an inspired technique of realism to achieve the right expressions from her—poking her rump off screen with a safety pin. The film was banned because of her scandalously debauched motivation for pleasure: cheating on her gross old husband. The censors decreed, you had to be married to revel in such pleasure and make faces like that. More intimate and revealing than a nude bathing scene, the close-up disturbed the Production Code censors in America, who considered even a safer, morally balanced edit of the film to be too indecent for audiences. The film was basically buried, and Lamarr was only allowed to work again if she cleaned up her act.

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Early L.A. Punk and Hardcore Scenes Explored in Edward Colver Photo Exhibit

Posted by Billy Gil, September 3, 2014 04:25pm | Post a Comment

lethal amounts edward colverCheck out pictures of punk and hardcore greats like The Germs, Black Flag and Dead Kennedys at IDLE WORSHIP: The Photography of Edward Colver at Lethal Amounts in Downtown L.A. from Sept. 20 through Nov. 22. Opening night is at 8 p.m. Sept. 20. Amoeba is proud to be a sponsor of this event.

Photographer Edward Colver captured emerging subcultures of the late ’70s and early ’80s in L.A., documenting every show he attended from 1978 to 1984 and photographing luminaries from movements such as hardcore, death rock, thrash, new wave, industrial, skate punk and more. His photos cover the aforementioned artists plus such bands as Christian Death, The Cramps, Circle Jerks, Youth Brigade, The Mentors, Lydia Lunch, Fear, Nick Cave, Siouxsie & the Banshees, PIL, Motorhead and more. His work has been shown at galleries and museums around the globe to the point that Colver is considered one of the premier punk photographers.

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'Punk the Capital' Film Seeks to Chronicle D.C. Hardcore Scene

Posted by Billy Gil, May 21, 2014 03:10pm | Post a Comment

punk the capital

A new documentary currently in production seeks to explore the fertile punk and hardcore scene of Washington, D.C. in the late 1970s and ’80s.

Filmmakers Paul Bishow and James Schneider are seeking funding for their documentary Punk the Capital, Straight from Washington D.C. via Kickstarter. The film is more than 10 years in the making and will explore how the hardcore movement began and why it has such staying power, focusing on the period from 1976 to 1985.

ian mackaye
Ian MacKaye

The filmmakers say they conducted more than 100 interviews with key figures in the hardcore movement, collecting more than 200 hours of archival footage along with flyers, pictures, zines and more paraphernalia from the time. The film includes interviews with and footage of such hardcore luminaries as Alec and Ian MacKaye (the latter from Minor Threat, Fugazi, The Evens, The Teen Idles and Embrace), Henry Rollins (Black Flag), Jeff Nelson (Minor Threat), Jello Biafra (Dead Kennedys), Tesco Vee (The Meatmen, Touch & Go), Cynthia Connolly (photographer, Dischord), Joe Keithley (D.O.A.), Sharon Cheslow (Chalk Circle) and more.

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