Amoeblog

Hippies and Hooligans -- Great Madchester covers of 60s tunes

Posted by Eric Brightwell, June 3, 2014 04:57pm | Post a Comment
 
Although our music and our drugs stayed the same, Although our music and our interests are the same

1988 -- the Second Summer of Love. 1989 -- the end of South African apartheid and the cold war. Love was all around and if it wasn't enough to make one euphoric there was ecstasy and Madchester to the rescue. What were baggies but hip-hop-and-house-hip hippies-cum-hooligans-cum-hippies again? In case we needed further proof, the baggies made the connection more obvious with their updated covers of psychedelic and Situationist era tunes which at their worst sounded like karaoke versions spruced up with the funky drummer beat but at occasionally exceeded the popularity of the originals.




1988 - The Inspiral Carpets had formed in Oldham in 1983 and from the beginning were obviously smitten with 1960s garage punk and made no bones about it, releasing a cover of ? & the Mysterians' massive 1966 hit, "96 Tears," in 1988.

In 1989, Scottish band The Soup Dragons released a cover of a 1965 Rolling Stones song, "I'm Free." It was whilst watching the video to this song that one of my uncles (who'd experienced the first Summer of Love firsthand) who remarked "This is just the '60s."


In 1990, Scouse veterans The Farm covered Boyce & Hart's "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" (as "Stepping Stone") from 1966. 



That same year Candyflip (a duo from the members of which were from Stoke-on-Trent and Merseyside) covered The Beatles' 1967 hit, "Strawberry Fields Forever" and Manchester's Happy Mondays covered John Kongos's "He's Gonna Step On You Again" (as "Step On").



By 1991, the Madchester buzz was fading and the much-missed World of Twist -- who sort of bridged Madchester and the proto-Britpop Glam Revival and the Crimplene Scene --  covered The Rolling Stones' 1967 tune, "She's a Rainbow."

*****

SF DJ Dance Party Temptation Pays Tribute to Manchester's Rich Musical Legacy

Posted by Billyjam, December 18, 2010 11:23am | Post a Comment
"And God Created Manchester (Pt 1)" from Rock Family Trees

As the above excerpt from the the Rock Family Trees series about the history of the Manchester music scene (see Pt 2 and Pt 3) nicely outlines, and as most of us Smiths/Joy Division etc. fans already well know, Manchester, England has an incredibly rich musical legacy. It spans several decades with a seemingly never ending stream of talented bands and artists including (to name but a handful) New Morrissey, Manchester UnitedOrder, The Stone Roses, James, 808 State, The Durutti Column, The Happy Monday, The Inspiral Carpets, The Fall, Autechre, The Ting Tings, and Herman's Hermits.

Also well aware of this are the music loving folks who throw the ongoing Bay Area electro/80's/indie/goth themed Temptation party. So for tonight's (sure to be hella fun) Temptation party at Cat Club, the theme is Manchester and that's what the DJs will be spinning all night long. I caught up with Temptation DJ/promoter DJ Damon, who co-produces the Bay Area club night with Dangerous Dan and Skip, and who holds a special place in his heart for Manchester's rich musical history to ask him about tonight's party and Manchester music in general.

Continue reading...

MADCHESTER MUSIC MAVEN TONY WILSON DIES AT 57

Posted by Billyjam, August 10, 2007 03:22pm | Post a Comment

Manchester music maven Anthony Wilson, whose life was depicted in the movie 24 Hour Party People, died in hospital in England earlier today of a heart attack (Friday, August 10th), according to news reports from the BBC, Sky News, and NMEReportedly the former radio and TV broadcaster, record label boss and owner of the legendary Hacienda nightclub, who had been suffering from cancer, died at the Christie Hospital in Manchester. He was 57 and last year was diagnosed with kidney cancer and had been in hospital receiving treatment since with the life-prolonging drug Sutent.

Wilson founded the famous Hacienda and was one of five co-founders of Factory Records, which produced bands such as New Order and the Happy Mondays during a period in the 80s dubbed "Madchester." See the clip below in which Steve Coogan plays Wilson in the great 2002 movie 24 Hour Party People and is teased in this funny closing by the God character for not signing the Smiths. And below the 24 Hour Party People clip is an interview with the real Tony Wilson from British TV, in a show about the Factory and Joy Division. For a full tribute to Wilson, read the recommended obit in the UK paper theGuardian from 8/13.